Know someone interested in an aviation scholarship? Here are two groups accepting scholarship applicants:

• Alaska Air Carriers Association: http://bit.ly/2gmmlYs

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• Alaska Airmen Association: http://bit.ly/2gLXIkI

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Join Professor Hensley for spring classes at UAA, where students will explore Alaska and its future, and more.

ALASKA’S FUTURE …EXPLORING THE REALITIES – Alaska Policy Frontiers

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This course will focus on Alaska and its future. It will address major historical eras that shaped Alaska. These eras will provide a backdrop to understand and meet the challenges of creating policies and practical actions which will shape a livable and dynamic Alaska for future generations.

Exploring Native Corporations – Traditional Values & the Modern Alaska Native Corporation

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 This short course will explore the use of the modern corporation and its application to traditional societies in Alaska.  Students will have an opportunity to discuss the corporation in the context of cultures that had little or no experience with business corporations.

For more information, please contact Student Advising @ (907) 786-4100 or email sac@uaa.alaska.edu.

Doyon Foundation will closed on Wednesday, November 23 at 12:00 PM through Friday, November 25, 2016 in observance of the Thanksgiving Holiday. We apologize for any inconvenience and hope you have a safe and warm holiday weekend!

The deadline is coming up fast! November 30th is the application deadline for Plumbers and Pipefitters Local Union 375 Training Center December interview. Click here for more information on our 5-year apprenticeship http://www.ualocal375.org/Apprenticeship.html

Chert

Chert is an Alaska Native language keyboard for iPhone.

Specifically, it’s a third-party keyboard which includes all the Alaska Native language characters which don’t exist in English. Chert makes it possible to type in any Alaska Native language on your iPhone. It means you can text niġisuktuŋa, Paaluk ax̱ jeewú, or ch’iṯh’ąįy as easily as you can send little blue heart emojis.

You can get Chert by clicking here or by searching for “Chert” on the App Store. (You lucky few first downloaders may need to search “Chert Alaska Native,” until Apple bumps the app up in its search results.) It’s free.

We’re excited and proud, and we got a lot of help. Thanks again to the language experts – many of you! – who helped us make the app as good as it could be, and provided other valuable suggestions. We’re so grateful.

Sivunmun atautchikun!

(Onwards together!)

Grant Magdanz grantmagdanz@gmail.com

& Reid Magdanz reidmagdanz@gmail.com

*We’d like to release an Android version too. But first Grant or I will have to learn Java. If you happen to know an Android coder interested in tackling this, let us know.

The Nenana Native Association and Toghotthele Corporation hosted their annual Fish Camp July 18 – 29, 2016. The camp, organized by Janet Allen, Jeri Knabe and Amanda Salmon, and staffed by Kelly Ann Burke, Tracy Snow and Lynn Puryear, was open to all. Children and families from neighboring communities and many from the “non-Native” community attended the camp. Doyon Foundation’s Our Language grant and Doyon, Limited’s Daaga’ Awards were among the funders for this year’s Fish Camp, which promotes Lower Tanana Athabascan values of knowledge and respect for culture and heritage.

Lower Tanana language was a cornerstone of this year’s camp, and the children learned the names for parts of the human body, greetings, familial names, and how to identify many different animals in the language. They also had a great time singing songs in their ancestral language loudly and with confidence.

Parents have reported that their children have retained the knowledge from the camp – and are now sharing with the community. Carol Thomas shared, “I really enjoyed talking with my granddaughter about what she had learned during each day.” Lilly O’Brien, parent of two attendees, said, “I think my girls learned this year – they learn more and more every year.”

“I am confident that if you asked my kids if they would rather spend two weeks at fish camp – or two weeks at Disneyland – that they would choose Fish Camp.” – Tracy Snow

Camp attendees also went berry picking, took boat rides, learned camping and safety skills, and made many crafts. All attendees – kids, staff, elders and parents – truly enjoyed all aspects of Fish Camp. The kids enjoyed the games, the field trips and the food. The adults enjoyed talking with the kids about what they had learned. Adults also took pride in the fact that their children are now singing at cultural events and encouraging others to do so.

Attendees talked about goals for next year, including having kids stay at camp during bad weather to get a feel for what fish camp is “really” like during less-than-favorable conditions. They would also like to put additional focus on camping skills, such as setting up camp, collecting wood, tanning hides or collecting the birch bark for baskets. Parents would like their children learning skills from the beginning (collecting materials) to the end (finished product).

Each year families enjoy coming together at “Toghotthele,” which means “mountain that parallels the river,” to learn the language, music, and ways of the ancestors. Tracy Snow, staff and parent of four attendees, shared, “I am proud that my kids can sing and dance and speak at cultural events, and that they enthusiastically ask others to participate too.”

For more information on the Our Language grants or Doyon Foundation’s language revitalization program, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact Allan Hayton at haytona@doyon.com or 907.459.2162.

There’s still time to finish those applications! The application deadline for #ChampionsForChange is now FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18TH!

Apply at http://bit.ly/2017CFC before the deadline and you could become one of the next Champions for Change!