Doyon Foundation student Nicole Smith, daughter of Nancy and John Smith, and granddaughter of Elsie Smith, and Anita and Michael Bolton, aspires to become a marketing manager in a large corporation or to start her own business. From Dexter, New York, Nicole will begin at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Oswego in the fall and study marketing.Nicole Smith

Along with looking for internships, “my plan is to cheer at Oswego State. I have cheered since I was 9 years old. I have always loved the sport and cannot wait to continue my career in college,” says Nicole, who was also on a lacrosse team throughout high school.

Nicole says her biggest challenge to overcome has been transitioning into college life, especially “leaving the only home I have ever known. Leaving my family will certainly not be easy, but I know we can do it.”

Fostering a close relationship with her father, a firefighter, Nicole volunteered at the fire department in her community as a junior firefighter. She had the opportunity to go on calls, help get equipment and learn more by attending a weekly training class.

“My father, also enrolled in the Nenana tribe, is a firefighter and that always inspired me to help people like he does and to be just like him,” Nicole says.

Eager to start her college career, Nicole says, “Doyon Foundation has been so helpful as they have been there by giving me the opportunity to apply for scholarships to help me as I advance to higher education; they are great supporters.”

To supplement her scholarship, Nicole also plans to enroll in a work-study program to help pay for her tuition.

Her advice to current and future students is to “never give up. I just graduated high school and this is my time to shine. Show the world, your school, your family what you can do. If you choose to attend college, do your best and never give up.”

Nicole plans to join clubs at college, and encourages others to “always push for the stars whether it’s school, work, clubs, sports or just simply meeting new people! Push as hard as you can with everything you do. Go for your dreams!”

Doyon Foundation Language Revitalization Program Director Allan Hayton recently gave a plenary talk on Language Revitalization & The Arts at the Institute on Collaborative Language Research (CoLang), an international conference that took place at the University of Alaska Fairbanks June 20 – July 24, 2016.

CoLang is a biennial gathering designed to provide an opportunity for community language activists and linguists to receive training in community-based language documentation and revitalization. The conference consisted of two weeks of intensive language revitalization workshops and presentations, followed by a three-week linguistics field methods practicum in endangered languages.

In his June 28 presentation, available online here, Hayton shared his experiences collaborating on endangered language theatre projects, including a Perseverance Theatre production of Macbeth in the Tlingit language that was presented at the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian, a Gwich’in adaptation of King Lear (Lear Khehkwaii), and A Midsummer Night’s Dream featuring Tlingit, Yup’ik and Gwich’in languages (both productions with Fairbanks Shakespeare Theatre).

The focus of Hayton’s talk was how the theatre can create a space for endangered languages to come to life, and how the arts can engage the imagination in the language classroom for educators and learners. A future production Hayton is currently dreaming up is a Romeo & Juliet in Gwich’in and Inupiaq languages.

In addition to the many wonderful workshops and presentations at CoLang, Hayton was especially interested in participating in the three-week practicum in linguistic field methods that closed out the conference. Participants could choose from among Hän (Athabascan), Unangam Tunuu (Aleut), or Miyako (Ryukyuan) practica. These practica provided excellent opportunities to sharpen documentation skills, engage with speakers, and make connections with others teaching and revitalizing these endangered languages.

Professor Dr. Willem De Reuse taught the Hän Athabascan practicum, with invaluable assistance from speakers Ruth Ridley, Ethel Beck, Adeline Juneby and Percy Henry. There were also young teachers and learners participating, including Shyanne Beatty from Eagle, and Georgette McLeod, Mary Henry, Angie Joseph-Rear, Melissa Hawkins and Erika Scheffen from Dawson, Yukon Territory. Graduate and undergraduate linguists from several different universities rounded out the class.

Hän is a very close sister language to Gwich’in, Hayton noted. “If you laid the two languages side by side, you would see many similarities,” he said. “But you cannot assume the rules for one language would automatically apply to the other. Each language in the world is unique, and the rules are implicitly decided among the speakers, changing fluidly over time.”

For example, he said, notice the similarities and differences in the translations below:

  • English: The moose walked towards the lake.
  • Hän: Jë̀jùu män ts’ą̈̀’ ä̀haww.
  • Gwich’in: Dinjik van ts’à’ ah’àl.

“It was a great experience in the classroom with the speakers, and everyone learned a great deal that will help in upcoming projects involving Hän, as well as other languages of the Doyon region,” Hayton said.

CoLang 2016 was an inspiring gathering of many different people from around the world, all focused on the work of documenting and revitalizing endangered languages, Hayton said. Endangered language communities face similar challenges, and this gathering allowed attendees to share their ideas, inspirations, solutions and hope with one another.

Hayton said he will take what he learned from his fellows at CoLang, and apply those lessons to work for languages in the Doyon region. “Adak’ohtii, ts’a’ diiginjk k’yaa kwaii eenjit tth’aii nihk’it gwiinzii gwitr’it t’agwahah’yaa yuu,” he said. “Take care, and keep up the good work on behalf of our languages.”

CoLang 2018 will be held at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

Doyon Foundation student Christina Edwin is the daughter of Christine Edwin and Greg Hoffman, and the granddaughter of Flora McCoy and Steve Feltch, and Virginia Wells and Donald Hoffman. From Anchorage, Alaska, Christina expects to graduate in May 2018 with a bachelor’s degree in rural development and a minor in Alaska Native languages from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF).Christina Edwin

In the fall Christina will start her junior year at UAF, where she will focus on maintaining a high GPA and return to her role as president of the Native Student Union. “We are a Native student lead club on campus. I look forward to organizing our annual events and amping up our team to build our leadership,” she says.

Christina, who has always dreamt of doing research around community health, will also be working as an undergraduate fellow on a research project partnering with tribes in the Interior on sustainable, traditional and customary hunting, fishing and gathering practices.

Doyon Foundation has “been a great financial support,” Christina says, which has allowed her to continue building her leadership capacity through multiple roles within the UAF Native community and the Alaska Native community at large.

Outside of the classroom Christina enjoys dancing and is a member of the UAF Inu-Yupiaq dancers. She also prioritizes healthy eating, “so I spend mornings and evenings cooking to energize my body and spirit.” She encourages students to take time to do what they love and to set goals for themselves.

However going to school outside of Anchorage has its challenges as well. “I would say one of the most enduring parts of my college career is being away from my family in Anchorage,” Christina says. She spends her breaks reconnecting with family in Anchorage, especially her mom who she says is “the motivation for my success for all that I do.”

Nothing is stopping this junior, who spends most of her time outside of classes and homework organizing educational events as well as nurturing her culture and community’s well-being. “Place yourself amongst people who are go-getters and will support and uplift you in both times of failure and success. Don’t settle for less,” says Christina. “Most of all, remember where you come from and continue to nurture those roots.”

Allan Hayton, Doyon Foundation’s language revitalization program director, had the honor of speaking at the invitation-only TEDxFairbanks 2016, which took place in Fairbanks in February. The video of his presentation is now available online – watch it here!TEDx YouTube.jpeg

“Despite years of experience in front of audiences as an actor and storyteller, this TEDx talk was an intimidating and nerve-wracking challenge. I am grateful for the supportive and encouraging circle of friends in the Morris Thompson Cultural Center that day,” Hayton said.

TED is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks. In his talk, titled Intimate Space: Athabascan Language, Land, Culture, Hayton discussed how the Athabascan languages of Alaska have developed over centuries in intimate conversation with the natural world.

“Most of all I wanted to convey the story of our ancestral languages, and hopefully inspire others to become involved in learning and teaching them,” Hayton said.

For more information on Doyon Foundation and the language revitalization program, visit www.doyonfoundation.com. Find the video of Hayton’s TEDx talk on YouTube.

 

Science Post Graduate Scholarship Fund (S.T.E.M. Loan for Service)

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for the AY 2016-2017

Science Post Graduate Scholarship Fund (STEM Loan for Service) is a graduate level educational loan awarded to United States Federally-recognized American Indian and Alaska Native community members (students) pursuing graduate or professional level education. To be considered, applicants must possess a minimum 3.0 GPA and be pursuing a master, doctorate or professional degree in the STEM fields, be full-time student at an accredited graduate or professional school in the United States. STEM Loan for Service recipients must agree to relocate, if necessary, to obtain acceptable employment for the service payback agreement.

The specific purpose of the Science Post Graduate Scholarship Fund (SPGSF) program is to provide financial assistance to eligible American Indian and Alaska Native graduate and professional degree candidates to promote Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) research in and opportunities for careers with Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) and BIE funded organizations on and off reservation and tribal governments. Future employment with other federal and state agencies and private entities may be eligible if the organization’s primary mission is assistance and support to tribal communities or individuals.

Advanced education is the STEM fields is in greater demand than ever before, particularly in Indian communities. Many tribal lands are situated on lands with greater natural resources potential that requirement individuals with education, skills and expertise to sustainably develop resources. Indian students in STEM fields often recognize the importance of reinvesting their knowledge back into their home communities, bringing skills back to home tribes or other tribal communities. There is a high deficiency in STEM fields and urgency for research to understand why. A portion of the SPGSF will be directed towards graduate level (Masters and Doctoral) research to understand the barriers that discourage Indian students participation in these fields and expanding STEM opportunities at Tribal Colleges and Universities.

The SPGSF is a loan for service program to be served on a 1 per 1 basis, i.e., one year of funding per one year of service. The maximum amount of an award will be up to $30,000 per year. Actual award amounts and the number of awards will be determined based on the number of funded students at each academic level (master’s, professional and doctoral).

Note: All applicants are required to submit a Tribal Eligibility Certificate (TEC) and Financial Needs Form (FNF) which is always available at http://www.aigcs.org where you may also review the AIGC Online Application Instructions.

Click here for more information.

Apply by Thursday, August 4

Doyon Foundation is recruiting Alaska Native high school graduates or GED recipients to apply for a scholarship to attend the 13-week intensive Law Enforcement Academy training program, to be held August 15 – November 11 at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Community and Technical College. Completed applications must be received by Thursday, August 4. Download the application packet here.

Completion of the training program will qualify you for employment in the security division of Doyon Universal Services (DUS). We have partnered with DUS, which has offered to pay the fees for items required in the application, including criminal history, drug test, driving record history and fingerprints.

The $7,500 scholarship to attend the training is generously provided by the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company Alaska Native Program.

If you or someone you know are interested in a career in law enforcement, please review the eligibility requirements and learn about the application process in the application packet available on our website. Remember that completed applications must be received by Thursday, August 4.

For more information or to request a hard-copy application packet, please call the Foundation at 907.459.2048 or 1.888.478.4755 ext. 2048.

GOTNV is sending out call for volunteers!

 

WEIO Registration Booth

July 20-July 23 from 10am-2pm and 6pm-10pm

Two-hour time slots, with two (2) people to sign for each shift

Volunteer duties: register voters, promote picnic, promote voting!

 

Summer Slam Series Picnic and Free Throw Contest

July 22 at Kiwanis Park

Set up time: 10am – 2pm

Picnic: 2pm – 5pm

Clean up time: 5pm – 6pm

 

Volunteer duties:

  • Set up crew: 10 volunteers
  • Food Servers: 10 volunteers
  • On the Grill: 2-5 volunteers
  • Free Throw volunteers: 2-5 volunteers
  • Clean up Crew: 10 volunteers
  • T-shirt and prize distribution: 4 volunteers
  • Registration Table: 4 volunteers

To volunteer email Johnny Stickman, GOTNV Intern at Doyon, Limited at stickmanj@doyon.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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