December 2015


There is still time to make an impact in the lives of the individuals Doyon Foundation serves through scholarships and language revitalization!  Please consider making  a tax-deductible year-end gift to the Foundation by December 31st.

Click here to give online or you can fill out a donor form and mail a check to:

Doyon Foundation
615 Bidwell Avenue, Suite 101
Fairbanks, Alaska, 99701

We wish you the happiest of New Years!  Thank you for your continued support.

-Doyon Foundation

January 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Deech’ara’aii = Potlatch
Juk khaa deech’ara’aii gwiheelyaa. = Tonight there will be a potlatch.

1s Hihłyaa      -I will be          1p Tr’iheelyaa      -We will be

2s Heenlyaa     -You will be        2p Hohłyaa          -You (all) will be

3s Heelyaa      -He/she will be     3p Giheelyaa        -They will be

G –Gwiheelyaa -there will be

Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

February 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Łyaa = Truly
It’ee łyaa t’iinyaa o’. = You are speaking the truth.

1s T’ihnyaa       I am saying            1p T’arahnyaa   We are saying

2s T’iinyaa      You are saying         2p T’ohnyaa     You (all) are saying

3s T’inyaa       He/she is saying       3p T’iginyaa    They are saying

Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

March 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Ch’andzaa = You dance
Shaa ch’andzaa! = Dance with me!

1s Ch’aldzaa     I am dancing              1p Ch’araadzaa  We are dancing

2s Ch’andzaa     You are dancing      2p Ch’oodzaa          You(all) are dancing

3s Ch’aadzaa     He/she is dancing         3p Ch’agaadzaa  They are dancing


Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

April 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Tthał = Caribou fence
Niizhit dai’ tthał haa vadzaih naraazhrii. = Long ago we hunted caribou with fence.

1s Nalzhrii = I am hunting                  1p Naraazhrii = We are hunting

2s Nanzhrii = You are hunting     2p Noozhrii = You (all) are hunting

3s Naazhrii = He/she is hunting   3p Nagaazhrii = They are hunting


Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

May 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Vikeech’ałch’yaa = I am cooking.
Vadzaih nilii vikeech’ałch’yaa. = I am cooking caribou meat.

1s Vikeech’ałch’yaa     = I am cooking              1p Vikeech’arahch’yaa   = We are cooking

2s Vikeech’ąhch’yaa     = You are cooking  2p Vikeech’ohch’yaa     = You (all) are cooking

3s Vikeech’ahch’yaa       = He/she is cooking       3p Vikeech’agahch’yaa   = They are cooking


Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

June 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Neech’aga’aa = They are eating.
Tribal Hall hee neech’aga’aa. = They are eating at the Tribal Hall.

1s neech’ih’aa   = I am eating                       1p neech’ara’aa = We are eating

2s neech’in’aa   = You are eating          2p neech’oh’aa = You (all) are eating

3s neech’a’aa    = He/she is eating                 3p neech’aga’aa = They are eating


Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

July 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Łat = Smoke
Gwanlįį = There is

Chiitaii łat gwanlįį. = There is a lot of smoke outside.

    1s Ihłįį     = I am                     1p Tr’inlįį = We are

    2s Inlįį     = You are                  2p Ohłįį = You (all) are

    3s Nilįį     = He/she is                3p Ginlįį = They are

   
Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

August 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Shroonch’yaa = Fun

Gwahtsii = Somebody makes

Juk drin shroonch’yaa gwahtsii. = Have a fun time today.

    1s Ałtsii   = I make            1p Tr’ahtsii    = We make

    2s Ąhtsii   = You make          2p Ohtsii       = You all make

    3s Ahtsii   = He/she makes      3p Gahtsii      = They make


Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

September 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Angal = You run
Vadzaih naantł’ii taii angal. = You run after the caribou herd.

    1s Algal    = I run                     1p Tr’aagal = We Run

    2s Angal    = You run          2p Oogal    = You all run

    3s Aagal    = He/She runs     3p Gaagal   = They run

   
Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

October 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Neeyaakee = Sunrise
Juk van neeyaakee gwiizhik hakeesha’aii. = I woke this morning while the sun was rising.

    1s hakeesha’aii     I awaken        1p hakeeree’aii     We awaken

    2s hakeena’aii      You awaken      2p hakeekhwa’aii    You all awaken

    3s hakee’aii        He/She awaken   3p hakeegee’aii     They awaken

   
Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

November 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Ch’anjaa = Elder
Ch’anjaa naii googinjik k’yaa gwiinzii gaagiindaii. = The elders know their language really well.

    1s Gaashandaii  I know          1p Gaagwiindaii     We know

    2s Gaanandaii   You know        2p Gaakhwandaii     You all know

    3s Gaandaii     He/She knows    3p Gaagiindaii      They know


Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

December 2015

Translations in Gwich’in
Oozhii = Present
Shahan Drin Tsal eenjit oozhii shintł’eeyin’aii. = My mom gave me a present for Christmas.

    Oozhii shintł’in’aii.           You give a present to me.

    Oozhii shintł’eeyin’aii.        She/He gave a present to me.

    Oozhii shintł’eegiiyin’aii.     They gave a present to me.

    Oozhii nantł’ii’aii.            I give a present to you.

    Oozhii nantł’eeyin’aii.         He/She gave a present to you.

    Oozhii nantł’eegiiyin’aii.      They give a present to you.

    Oozhii vintł’in’aii.            You give a present to him/her.

    Oozhii vintł’eeyin’aii.         He/She gave a present to him/her.

    Oozhii vintł’eegiiyin’aii.      They gave a present to him/her.

  Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

The Jackson Laboratory is now accepting applications for its 2016 Summer Student Program. All application materials, including recommendation letters, are due by February 2, 2016.

The Summer Student Program (SSP) is a ten-week research internship in genetics and genomics open to US high school and undergraduate students. Internships are offered at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, and at the Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine in Farmington, Connecticut. SSP interns are provided a weekly stipend and other benefits including full room and board and round trip travel from home to the Laboratory.

Participants will conduct independent research as part of a lab team seeking to advance our understanding of the causes and treatment of disease. Students may select from a range of projects including bioinformatics, computational biology, genomics, development, neurobiology, reproductive biology, metabolism, immunology, aging, cancer, and many more.

Click here for a full program description and here for eligibility information. Students must apply online and all supplemental materials must be received by the February 2, 2016 deadline.

The Jackson Laboratory is an independent, nonprofit biomedical research institution, dedicated to contributing to a future of better health care based on the unique genetic makeup of each individual. Click here to learn more.

The RSVP deadline for the January 2 Where Are Your Keys (WAYK) language-learning workshop has been extended through Thursday, December 31. Learn more and RSVP now!

Doyon Foundation will host two free language-learning workshops in Fairbanks in January. The workshops are based on the WAYK technique, which is one of the most rapid and effective tools for learning language.

Workshops, which will be held at the Doyon Industrial Facility in the Doyon, Limited meeting room at 701 Bidwell Ave. in Fairbanks, include:

  • January 2, 2016: No Pressure WAYK Refresher, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Class will be focused on the Gwich’in language but open to all. RSVP by December 31.
  • January 16, 2016: No Pressure WAYK Refresher, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Class will be focused on the Lower Tanana language but open to all. RSVP by January 11.

Based on the belief that “By learning, you will teach. By teaching you will learn,” WAYK is appropriate for anyone interested in learning or teaching their Native language, whether a first-time learner or a fluent speaker.

In addition to the one-day workshops, a week of daily sessions will be available after each refresher. In these daily sessions, instructors will give in-depth, hands-on assistance to learners and speakers covering WAYK techniques. It is not required to attend the refresher to attend the daily sessions. See the daily session schedule on the RSVP form.

For more information or to RSVP for the workshops, visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact stickmans@doyon.com or 907.459.2048. To learn more about the Where Are Your Keys language learning and teaching method, visit www.whereareyourkeys.org.

“With your help, anything is possible,” said Joseph Bifelt to the Doyon Foundation donors during his speech at the Foundation’s 2015 scholarship award ceremony.

Joe Bifelt and Jessica Black

Jessica Black, left, and Joe Bifelt, right, at the 2015 Doyon Foundation scholarship award ceremony

Bifelt, a Doyon Foundation competitive scholarship recipient, is a student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where he is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in secondary education.

“Growing up in the village, I witnessed many teachers come and go. They did not necessarily understand our culture and who we were. I feel that I would be able to relate very well to the rural Alaskan students and have the ability to help them build brighter futures both for themselves and their community,” Bifelt said.

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Support students when you Pick. Click. Give to Doyon Foundation!

Alaskans have the opportunity to help make “anything possible” for students like Bifelt by supporting Doyon Foundation through the Pick. Click. Give. program. The 2016 Pick. Click. Give. campaign kicked off January 1, and Alaskans are encouraged to support student scholarships by donating a portion of their PFD to Doyon Foundation when completing the 2016 PFD application.

In 2015, a total of 75 Alaskans contributed $5,375 to Doyon Foundation through Pick. Click. Give. With the support of donors like these, the Foundation is able to provide scholarships and offer cultural opportunities to Alaska Native students who are pursuing their educational, career and life goals. During the 2014 – 2015 academic year, the Foundation awarded a total of 565 scholarships totaling $465,237.

For more information on Doyon Foundation and opportunities to support students, visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact 907-459-2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

Doyon Foundation will be closed December 24-25, 2015.  Our office will re-open Monday, December 28th.  We wish you a safe and happy Holiday Season.

Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) is excited to offer internship opportunities in our digital fabrication resource center (Fab Lab).   Created in partnership with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the Fab Lab is a state of the art educational space that challenges youth to connect to their full science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) potential.  The variety of tools and techniques available merge the latest technology with architecture and construction.  The goal is to use cutting edge tools and techniques and apply them to cultural ideals to expand students’ creative thought processes.  In the Fab Lab Alaska’s future leaders in engineering, design, artistry and innovation are able to further develop their skill set.   Samples of the computer numerical controlled (CNC) machines available in our Fab Lab include:

  • laser-powered cutter and etcher that works with wood, acrylic and other materials
  • A vinyl cutter used for graphics and masking applications
  • a mini desktop milling machine that plots copper and other materials to make antennae, circuit boards and more
  • large robotic router system
  • an industrial embroidery machine
  • 3D printers capable of producing fully assembled objects with moving parts

CITC recruits highly motivated full or part-time college students currently enrolled in or recently graduated from an undergraduate/graduate degree program or technical training school.  Please visit https://external-citci.icims.com/jobs/intro?hashed=-435803938 for available internship positions, a full job description, and a CITC internship application. For question regarding this opportunity, please contact Nikki Graham at ngraham@citci.org.

Anyone interested in applying to teach in Rampart, Alaska can contact the Yukon Flats School District office at 662-2515 or check the Alaska Teacher Placement website at www.alaskateacher.org.

Doyon Foundation will host two free language-learning workshops in Fairbanks in January. The workshops are based on the Where Are Your Keys (WAYK) technique, which is one of the most rapid and effective tools for learning language. View the flyer or RSVP to attend.

Workshops, which will be held at the Doyon Industrial Facility in the Doyon, Limited meeting room at 701 Bidwell Ave. in Fairbanks, include:

  • January 2, 2016: No Pressure WAYK Refresher, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Class will be focused on the Gwich’in language but open to all. RSVP by December 28.
  • January 16, 2016: No Pressure WAYK Refresher, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Class will be focused on the Lower Tanana language but open to all. RSVP by January 11.

Based on the belief that “By learning, you will teach. By teaching you will learn,” WAYK is appropriate for anyone interested in learning or teaching their Native language, whether a first-time learner or a fluent speaker.

In addition to the one-day workshops, daily sessions will be available after each refresher. In these daily sessions, instructors will give in-depth, hands-on assistance to learners and speakers covering WAYK techniques. It is not required to attend the refresher to attend the daily sessions. See the daily session schedule on the RSVP form.

The 10 ancestral languages of the Doyon region are all severely to critically endangered, and will be lost within the span of a few generations if no action is taken. The workshops are offered as part of the Foundation’s language revitalization program, which is working to ensure that current and future generations of Athabascan people have the opportunity to hear, to learn, and to speak the languages of their ancestors.

For more information or to RSVP for the workshops, visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact stickmans@doyon.com or 907.459.2048. To learn more about the Where Are Your Keys language learning and teaching method, visit www.whereareyourkeys.org.

 

AKNS Classes! Spring 2016! Register today!

PADM 671 Alaska Policy Frontiers with Professor Willie Hensley

This course will focus on Alaska and its future. It will address major historical eras that shaped Alaska. This will provide a backdrop for understanding and meeting challenges of creating policies and practical actions that will shape a livable and dynamic Alaska for future generations.

Willy Hensley served for 10 years in the Alaska Legislature; 4 years in the House and 6 years in the Senate.  He was a founder of NANA Regional Corporation, director for 20 years and finally president.  While at NANA, he directed its involvement in the oilfield services area, most specifically in the environmental services and drilling ventures.  He was active in the development of the world’s largest lead and zinc mine, Red Dog.  Hensley helped form the Alaska Federation of Natives, serving as Executive Director, President and Co-Chairman. Hensley is currently Chair of the Board of Trustees of the First Alaskans Institute and Vice Chair of the Board of Trustees of Charter College.  Hensley is the author of Fifty Miles from Tomorrow: A Memoir of Alaska and the Real People, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

For More Information, please contact Janet Burton @ (907) 786-4171 or Email : anjeb@uaa.alaska.edu

APF Syllabus Spring 2016.pdf

Flyer- Alaska Policy Frontiers 2016- Spring.docx

This program enables new graduates with an interest in public health to work in a variety of public health settings. More information below and at http://www.cdc.gov/phap./

The mission of the CDC’s Public Health Associate Program (PHAP) is to train and provide experiential learning to early career professionals who contribute to the public health workforce. Managed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support, PHAP enables entry-level public health professionals to gain hands-on, real-life experience in the day-to-day operations of public health programs. The CDC works with a pool of young professionals and places them with a health department or Tribal organization that will create a mutually beneficially learning and work environment.  PHAPs are assigned to a host site for a full two years.

There were nine applications from Tribes or Tribal organizations in the last round to host a PHAP – and all nine were successfully matched with a CDC PHAP.  NIHB and the CDC would like to see an increase in both the number of Tribes/Tribal organizations that are hosting PHAPs, and the number of American Indian and Alaska Native young professionals that serve as PHAPs.  The CDC is now accepting applications for both.

Host site applications are open January 4-22, 2016

AND

PHAP candidate applications are open from January 4-8, 2016 (note that this is only five days)

Do you know a student that would like to receive practical experience with IHS Extern Program opportunities? The IHS Extern Program application cycle opened December 1, 2015 and the deadline for applications is Friday, January 15, 2016.

Like most professions, those in the medical field not only learn by studying, but by doing. As a participant in the IHS Extern Program, health professions students can gain a wealth of valuable clinical hours and on-the-job insight while working alongside a team of practicing clinicians.

This practical, pre-professional experience helps to ease the transition into clinical practice and is a great way to establish relationships with future colleagues and networks when pursuing an Indian health career. An IHS externship is the perfect opportunity to hone your skills while familiarizing students with American Indian and Alaska Native communities. It’s the type of experience no classroom can provide and it will be invaluable in their Indian health journey.

All externs are employed for 30 to 120 workdays per calendar year during non-academic periods. Externs receive a salary based on experience and years of academic training that is comparable to industry standards. IHS will waive the salary if the externship fulfills a required academic field placement or an internship, in which case it will instead pay all required tuition, fees and a regular monthly stipend (scholarship students only). The program also covers the cost of one round-trip ticket to the externship site.

Eligibility and Priority for Selection

To apply for an IHS Externship, you must be:

Funding for the IHS Extern Program is limited and selections are based on the needs of Indian health facilities. Selection is based on the following:

  • Health professions scholarship recipients.
  • Health professions students (non-recipients) who are American Indian or Alaska Native.
  • Non-American Indian/Alaska Native health professions students (non-recipients).
  • Preparatory or pre-graduate scholarship recipients.

How to Apply

All applicants, including those considering the USPHS Commissioned Corps’ JRCOSTEP program, must apply through USAJOBS. Applicants should search “student extern” jobs or use the job series and grade “GS-0699.”

The IHS Division of Oral Health offers two-week Dental Externships from April 1 – September 3. To learn more, visit www.ihs.gov/dentistry/index.cfm/dentalexternships/.

 Program Materials and Contact

For detailed information, please see the IHS Extern Program page. Please help to spread the word and encourage any eligible health professions students that you know to apply.

College Horizons, Inc. is a non-profit organization that supports the higher education of Native American students by providing college and graduate admissions workshops to American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students/participants from across the nation.  Two programs are offered in the summer:  College Horizons services current 10th-11th grade high school students and Graduate Horizons services college students and college graduates.  For more information on College Horizons, the high school program, please visit: www.collegehorizons.org.

Graduate Horizons is a four-day workshop for Native college students, college graduates, and master’s students in preparing for graduate school (master’s, Ph.D. or professional school).  Graduate Horizons partners with 45 university graduate/professional degree programs where admission officers, professors and deans mentor and advise students on the admissions process, professional/career development, and the various fields of study, research, and graduate programs available.  Participants of the program complete graduate ready personal statements/statements of purpose; resumes/cvʼs; applications; receive test-taking strategies (on the GRE, GMAT, LSAT, MCAT) by the Princeton Review Foundation; understand the financial aid process for graduate school and learn about graduate scholarship/fellowship opportunities; and they attend seminars on the various aspects of the admissions process (selecting faculty/professional recommenders, determining the right fit/match in a degree program, role of direct/relevant work experience, etc).

 

For more information on how to apply, click here.

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