December 2016


January 2016

Gwich’in

        Ch’anjaa Zhrii – January

        Agwal’ee – I am learning.

        Shiginjik k’yaa agwal’ee. – I am learning my language.

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.


Deg Xinag

        Giyema – Mask

        Ivi’a niłtiy giyema iłtse. – Grandpa is making a crane mask.

Translation provided by George Demientieff Holly.

February 2016

Gwich’in

        Veegwaadhat – February

        Gwilii – It is becoming

        Chiitaii gwiindhaa gwilii. – It is becoming warm outside.

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.


Deg Xinag

        Yixgitsiy – Grandfather of us all, Raven

        Yixgitsiy qay xidixi qunt’ox. – Raven is flying over the village.

Translation provided by George Demientieff Holly.

March 2016

Gwich’in

        Ch’izhin Zhrii. – March

        Ch’iitsiidlii. – Fiddle

        Tanan gwa’an ch’iitsiidlii ch’agahłii ts’a’ ch’agaadzaa. – They are playing fiddle music and dancing around Fairbanks.

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.


Deg Xinag

        Q’uliq’ay – Hawk

        Q’uliq’ay no’o xelanh. – There’s the Hawk Moon.

Translation provided by George Demientieff Holly.

April 2016

Gwich’in

        Ch’ikee Zhrii. – April

        K’ih. – Tracks

        Zhah zhit zhoh k’ih nał’in. – I see wolf tracks in the snow.

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.

May 2016

Gwich’in

        Gwiluu Zhrii. – May (literal translation “hard crusted snow”)

        K’Gwideedrii. – Spider

        Gwideedrii divyaa ditł’uu. – The spider is weaving its web.

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.

June 2016

Gwich’in

        Vanan Ch’iighoo. – June (literal translation “all birds laying eggs”)

        Nahsii. – Growing

        Gwanzhih kwaii nahshii. – The plants are growing.

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.

July 2016

Gwich’in

        Łuk Choo Zhrii. – July (literal translation “king salmon month”)

        Gwiindhaa. – Hot

        Shin goo’aii, ts’a’ chiitaii gwiindhaa. – It is summer, and it is hot outside.

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.

August 2016

Gwich’in

        Di’ilii. – August (literal translation “when caribou cleans the velvet off its antlers”)

        Neenahot’ii. – Butterfly

        Neenahot’ii ndaa diich’yaa. – The butterfly is beautiful.

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.

September 2016

Gwich’in

        Dinjik Zhrii. – September (literal translation “moose month”)

        Luk. – Fish

        Łuk keeshi’in. – I am fishing.

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.

October 2016

Gwich’in

        Vadzaih Zhrii. – October (literal translation “caribou month”)

        Nilii Gaih. – Dry Meat

        Nilii gaih eenjit shizhit gwiłts’ik. – I am hungry for dry meat.

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.

November 2016

Gwich’in

        Divii Zhrii. – November (literal translation “sheep month”)

        Dinjii gwitee tr’irilii. – We are voting (or putting people among leadership).

Translation provided by Allan Hayton.

December 2016

Gwich’in

        Ch’atsal. – December (literal translation “low on food”)

        Tsinehdan. – Peace

        Nan kak tsinehdan gooli’. – Let there be peace on Earth. Translation provided by Allan Hayton.

Doyon Foundation will close at 12:00 PM on Friday, December 30, 2016 in observance of New Year’s Day and will remain closed through Monday, January 2, 2017. The Foundation will reopen on Tuesday, January 3rd.

We hope you have a safe and warm holiday weekend!

 

The Cobell Scholarship application is now open!

Summer 2017 and Academic Year 2017-2018 opportunities available.

Visit www.cobellscholar.org to start your application.

Deadline: March 31, 2017

Full Circle scholarship applications are accepted from students beginning January 1 and ending May 31 of each year. The American Indian College Fund determines student eligibility and awards the scholarships. Award and denial notices will be mailed out to all applicants by August each year to the address listed on the application.

Click HERE for more information or to apply.

For more information about the American Indian College Fund scholarships please contact a member of the Student Success Services team at 800-776-3863.

See a link for The Alaska Native Language Digest below.

Alaska Language Revitalization Digest Vol 1 No 6 12.9.16.pdf

The Indigenous Teacher Education Program (ITEP) at the University of Arizona College of Education is seeking Indigenous preservice teachers committed to Indigenous education. Students accepted into the program will receive loan-for-service aid for tuition, stipend and technology; participate in the American Indian Language Development Institute, and work in schools serving Indigenous students.

Application Timeline:

• Pre-Application Advising: Oct. 28 – Dec. 21, 2017
• Application Submission: Jan. 10 – Feb. 10, 2017
• Start date of ITEP: June 5, 2017

Accepted students must have earned an Associate’s degree and AGEC-A with UA Elementary Education Program Prerequisites by: August 21, 2017.

For information: Sara Knepper, ITEP Academic Advisor
sme@email.arizona.edu | (520) 621-7865

https://www.coe.arizona.edu/itep

The Doyon Foundation fall student dinner was a success! Nearly 30 students, alumni, staff, special guests including Al Ketzler, Sr. and Foundation board member Joshua Peter, and other guests attended the event on October 25 at the Doyon Industrial Facility in Fairbanks.

Dinner guests enjoyed homemade bread rolls and moose soup, as well as an array of tempting desserts. Several guests went home with door prizes including a movie gift basket, fleece blanket and $25 Barnes and Noble gift card, a holiday popcorn tin, Halloween candy set, Regal Cinemas package for two, Hydz t-shirts and ViVi jewelry sets.

A special thank you to student Suki Merica for donating cupcakes, alumna Janis Carney for donating the ViVi jewelry sets, and Tanana Chiefs Conference education coordinator Blanch Murphy for donating the Hydz t-shirts.

See event photos on Facebook, and watch the Foundation website and Facebook for details on upcoming events!

capture

Apply for 2017-18 Scholarships at UAA

The deadline to submit a UAA Scholarship Application is February 15 prior to the academic year for which you are seeking scholarships. There are some scholarships that accept applications all year long, so please consider applying even if the deadline has passed.

Click HERE for more information or to apply.

logo

AEEF, along with the generosity of individual and corporate donors, currently funds the AEEF Scholarship Program. AEEF administers scholarships on behalf of engineering societies and committees including the Alaska Society of Professional Engineers (ASPE), American Society of Civil Engineers, Mat-Su Branch, and Anchorage E-Week. The goal of AEEF is to consistently provide scholarships to support higher education in college engineering and math/sciences programs.

AEEF funds scholarships for high school seniors who wish to pursue a degree in engineering from an ABET accredited engineering program. Scholarships are funded by the local engineering societies and awarded statewide and at the regional level in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and the Mat-Su Borough. Currently, AEEF awards approximately $30,000 annually statewide. The amount of individual awards varies from approximately $500 to over $4,000. By submitting one application, you will be considered for multiple scholarships:

2017 AEEF Scholarship Application
AEEF ASPE UAA Scholarship

To be considered for an award, the 2017 application must be used.

Submission Deadline: January 20, 2017

Click HERE for more information.

Winners will be announced during Engineers’ Week, February 19-25, 2017.

capture

APICC  coordinates the application process and administers the BP Process Technology Scholarship Program in partnership with BP Alaska.

The BP Process Technology Scholarship supports training for students who are interested in a career in Process Technology. An A.A.S degree in Process Technology prepares you for employment as an operations technician in the process industry. The program appeals to people who enjoy the challenges of using advanced computer technology and instrumentation to operate a variety of equipment systems and industrial processes. Process technology is defined as the study and application of the scientific principles associated with the operation and maintenance of the chemical processing industry.

Degree programs are offered through the University of Alaska Anchorage Kenai Peninsula College (KPC) in Soldotna, the KPC Anchorage Extension Site, and the University of Alaska Fairbanks Community and Technical College. Scholarships are available to students attending the PTEC program either full-time or part-time at any of the three University of Alaska campus locations.

Click HERE for more information or to apply.  Applications for the 2017-18 school year are due January 13, 2017.