August 2017


The Inspire Leadership Academy is excited to announce an Academy in Anchorage! The dates for the academy will be:

October 13, 14, 15
December 1, 2, 3
January 19, 20, 21
March 9, 10, 11
April 27, 28, 29

The cost is $2,700 and they are looking for 20 participants to fill the seats in order to be able to conduct the academy. You can find more information on the academy and registration information at www.inspireleadershipacademy.com or call Tracy Snow, Owner and lead facilitator, at (907) 322-9644 if you have questions.

Do you want to work in a program that is dedicated to providing effective language assistance to limited English proficient Alaska Native voters?

Would it make you feel good knowing that the work you do provides limited English proficient Alaska Native voters with the information and materials they need to participate in the election process?

Can you fluently speak, read, and write both the English and General Central Yup’ik, or Gwich’in Athabascan, or either Seward Peninsula Inupiaq or Northern Iñupiaq languages?

If you answered yes to the above questions, there is a great job waiting for you at the Division of Elections.

Click here for more information.

Complete survey by early bird deadline on September 29 for a chance to win $100 Visa gift card!

Doyon Foundation’s mission is “to provide educational, career and cultural opportunities to enhance the identity and quality of life for Doyon shareholders.” In support of this mission, we are conducting an education survey to better understand the needs of our students as they work toward their educational goals and prepare for their future careers. Take the survey here.

Microsoft Surface Pro 1 Tablet

Survey respondents will be entered to win prizes including this Microsoft Surface Pro 1 Tablet!

This survey is open to past and current scholarship recipients, as well as all individuals who are eligible for a Foundation scholarship, which includes original Doyon, Limited shareholders and children of original shareholders. You can find Doyon Foundation’s scholarship eligibility criteria here.

Complete the survey by the early bird deadline on Friday, September 29 for a chance to win a $100 Visa gift card! Early bird respondents will also be entered in the random drawing to win prizes after the survey deadline on Friday, October 13.

Everyone who completes the survey by the Friday, October 13 deadline will be entered in a random drawing for a chance to win:

  • A used Microsoft Surface Pro 1 Tablet generously donated by student Jordan Craddick
  • A People of the Water Pendleton Woolen Mills blanket from our Athabaskan Heritage Collection™ Spirit Keeper Series™
  • One $100 Visa gift card
  • One of four $50 Visa gift cards

Thank you for helping us better understand the needs of our students, and how we can better serve you!

Take the survey here.

 

Doyon Foundation will host our 2017 Scholarship Award Ceremony on Friday, September 8 at 2 p.m. The event, which celebrates our 302 fall scholarship recipients, will take place in the Doyon Facilities classroom, located at 701 Bidwell Ave. in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Nursing student in photo booth

The scholarship award ceremony will feature our always popular photo booth!

This fall, the Foundation will award a total of $395,300 in scholarships. The fall 2017 awards include 37 competitive scholarships, 73 basic part-time scholarships, and 192 basic full-time scholarships. Congratulations to all of this fall’s recipients!

In addition to presenting the scholarship recipients, the ceremony will also feature an opening prayer by Allan Hayton, our language revitalization program director; a welcome from Doris Miller, our executive director; and words from our alumni speaker and student speaker! The event will culminate with light refreshments and our always-popular photo booth.

Tanya - alumni speakerWe are excited to announce this year’s alumni speaker is Tanya Kaquatosh of Hughes, Alaska. Tanya is the daughter of Barbara Beatus and the late Norman Beatus of Hughes.  Her maternal grandparents are Johnson Moses and the late Bertha Moses of Allakaket and her paternal grandparents are Henry and Sophie Beatus of Hughes. Tanya holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Stanford and a MBA from Arizona State University.  She has also completed the Doyon Leadership Training in 2014. Tanya has worked as the director of regulatory affairs at Doyon Utilities since 2015; previous to that she was a financial specialist in the finance department for 3 years. Tanya was also the executive assistant to the president/CEO of Doyon, Limited for over 4 years. Tanya resides in Fairbanks with her husband, Steve, and their daughters, Skye and Kaytona.

Julian - student speakerJoining Tanya is our student speaker, Julian Thibedeau. Julian is a freshman at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where he is in the Rural Human Services Program.

Students, family, friends, teachers, donors and other supporters are invited and encouraged to attend. We hope to see you there!

As of the 2017 PFD application deadline, 61 donors pledged $3,850 to support Doyon Foundation scholarships. While we are very grateful for those donations, we are left far short of our $5,000 Pick. Click. Give. goal.

2017 grad yearbook collage

Your Pick. Click. Give. support allows us to help students like these – our Class of 2017 – reach their education, career and life goals. 

Luckily there is still time to get there! You can add or change a Pick. Click. Give. contribution through Thursday, August 31! Simply visit pfd.alaska.gov and click the “add or change a Pick. Click. Give. donation” link.

 

With your help, we are able to provide scholarships and offer cultural opportunities to Alaska Native students pursuing their educational, career and life goals. Last year, we awarded a total of 578 scholarships totaling $684,633.

 

These scholarships go to support the educational efforts of students like Aubrielle Champagne, who overcame incredible health challenges to achieve her dreams. And Melody Hoffman, a mother and nursing student who encourages other parents that “it is possible to raise our kids and get a degree.” And Noah Lovell, who takes time out from his studies to share about his culture, community and choosing a major.

 

Remember – you have until August 31 to help us reach our $5,000 Pick. Click. Give. goal! Thank you for your support!

 

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US Arctic Youth Ambassador Program is pleased to announce that they are recruiting for the 2017-2019 Cohort of US Arctic Youth Ambassadors!

The Arctic Youth Ambassadors collectively represent a diversity of Alaskan youth, including consideration for: geographic regions, cultural backgrounds and affiliations, gender, interests, skills and experiences, and organization connections. More about the program can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/arcticyouthambassadors/

and here: http://akgeo.org/youth-programs/arctic-youth-ambassadors/

There are three components to the application. Applications must include the following to be considered:

1. Recommendation from the nominator: https://goo.gl/forms/lR7RNcTX3GgZfz1D2

2. Commitment from a mentor: https://goo.gl/forms/jO9FRIwcYVtOFQF42

3. Student application: https://goo.gl/forms/nWMSSihMCvaZnToP2

A nominator should know the student very well and be able to speak to the student’s leadership abilities, strengths, and space for development and growth.

The mentor should be an individual that could be able to :

· Support the student in preparation for public speaking event;

· Help the student prepare and pack for conference/programs;

· Help the student host an exchange with their community;

· Help the student share their experiences with their school or community (e.g. through articles in the press, presentations at community events);

· Engaging the student in leadership opportunities in their local communities;

· Transporting students to and from airport.

It is possible for the nominator and mentor to be the same individual. If this is the case, they must fill out both forms.

The Online links above will also be available here: http://akgeo.org/youth-programs/arctic-youth-ambassadors/

An online application is preferred. A paper application is also attached to this email.

Criteria for eligible students:

· Must be an Alaskan Resident.

· Must be within the ages of 17-20

· Will have committed support of a mentor (may be a teacher, coach, counselor, relative, community leader, or other adult mentor)

· Show a high level of maturity, high potential in leadership, and would be successful working with peers from a wide diversity of backgrounds

· Demonstrate an interest in issues relevant to the changing arctic—these issues range from ecology, wildlife, and traditional knowledge to sustainable economic development, national and international policy, and health and wellbeing of arctic communities.

· Are willing and able to travel (with in-state travel expenses covered by the program and some flexibility to accommodate school schedules)

· Students who may not have had these types of opportunities in the past but would contribute and gain a great deal.

· A note about US Passports: Participating in the program may require a valid US Passport for International Travel, of which the participant is responsible for procuring.

The application process will open August 15th and close September 15th, 11:59pm Alaska Time. A review will begin September 15th 2017, and a Final Review will be completed in October 2017. Early applications are highly encouraged. If you have any questions or inquiries, please direct them to US Arctic Youth Ambassador Program Youth Programs Fellow:

Maka Monture

US Arctic Youth Ambassador Program

Anchorage, AK

Mmonture

Phone: 907-771-8490

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The U.S. Arctic Youth Ambassador Program was created by the Alaska Region of the U.S. FIsh and WIldlife Service, the Department of State, and nonprofit partner Alaska Geographic in 2015 under the auspices of the U.S. Chairmanship of the Arctic COuncil. The partnership continues during the 2017-2019 U.S. Chairmanship of the Arctic Council’s Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna Working Group.

2017 USAYA NominationApplication Form .docx

AYA_Email Announcement.pdf

Doyon Foundation is currently seeking candidates for three open seats on its board of directors. The deadline to apply is Monday, October 16 at 5 p.m. The open positions are for three-year terms expiring in 2020. 

Qualifications

Candidates seeking election to the Doyon Foundation board must be:

  • A Doyon shareholder
  • 18 years of age or older
  • Knowledgeable about private foundation management and higher education
  • Familiar with the Foundation’s vision, goals, mission and purpose
  • Committed to carrying out the duties of a board member, which include:
    • Attending quarterly board meetings
    • Serving on two board committees
    • Completing work outside of meetings
    • Representing the Foundation at various events
    • Speaking on behalf of the Foundation at events, if asked

Doyon Foundation is specifically interested in candidates with experience with nonprofit boards, fundraising, financial management, endowment fund investing, culture and language revitalization, and Alaska Native education.

Important Notice

Please note that, under federal laws governing private foundations, family members of Doyon Foundation board members are NOT eligible to receive a Doyon Foundation basic or competitive scholarship during their term on the board. Family members are defined as the board members’ spouse, ancestors, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and the spouses of children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Current Doyon Foundation scholarship recipients are also not eligible to serve on the board.

Responsibilities/Job Description

The duties of a Doyon Foundation board member include:

  • Contribute skills that help the Foundation make progress on planning.
  • Consistently work toward and produce results related to the Foundation’s strategic focus areas, which include providing consistent measurable results, diversifying and growing revenue streams, increasing shareholder educational opportunities, enhancing operations, and revitalizing languages and traditional Native values.
  • Define and oversee the mission of the Foundation and keep it relevant to the needs of Doyon shareholders and their descendants.
  • Approve programs/services and monitor their effectiveness.
  • Provide strategic guidance to the Foundation and its executive director.
  • Ensure financial solvency and help raise resources.
  • Select, support and evaluate the executive director.
  • Ensure continuous board improvement.
  • Attend quarterly meetings in Fairbanks, Alaska, as well as any special meetings called.
  • Serve on two board committees and possibly chair one committee, which include finance/investment, development/fundraising, language revitalization/culture, and governance.
  • Participate in at least one board training event each year.
  • Demonstrate willingness to take on other duties and assignments, as needed.
  • Represent and, if asked, speak on behalf of Doyon Foundation at various events.

Application Instructions/Deadline

Applications are accepted using this online form. The form does not take long to fill out and candidates are able to upload resumes and/or other materials.

Candidates may also download and print the 2017 board candidate application to complete and mail to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Avenue, Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99701. Mailing instructions are provided on the form.

Please note that candidates are required to submit an updated resume along with their completed application.

It is highly recommended that candidates familiarize themselves with the Foundation and its work by reviewing the Foundation’s website, blog and Facebook page prior to submitting an application.

The deadline to apply is Monday, October 16 at 5 p.m.

For more information, please visit doyonfoundation.com or contact Doris Miller, Doyon Foundation executive director, at 907.459.2048 or millerd@doyon.com.

Fairbanks residents interested in learning to speak the Gwich’in language, here is a great opportunity at UAF. The class is in-person immersion based, Monday-Friday from 4-5pm. It’s scheduled at that time so that local organizations with an interest in supporting their employees to learn an Alaska Native language might consider either tuition and/or work time to support their employees to attend for the last hour of work each day.

This is part of a larger vision to produce fluent second language speakers, some of whom we hope will decide to continue on to become certified teachers that could teach in a future Preschool through 12th grade (P-12) language immersion school.

Alaska Native Languages F141X F01 — Beginning Athabascan
Instructor: Peter, H
Credits: 5

Introduction to an Alaska Athabascan language. Class will deal with one of the eleven Athabascan languages spoken in Alaska. Literacy and grammatical analysis for speakers. For non-speakers, a framework for learning to speak, read and write the language.

CRN: 74566
Dates: 08/28/2017 – 12/16/2017
Time: 4:00pm- 5:00pm Days: MTWRF
Campus: Fairbanks Campus
Building: Brooks
Room: 104A

Doyon Foundation is seeking applicants for our open administrative assistant position. If you are interested in being part of a small, dedicated team working to support students and revitalize Native language, this could be the job for you!

Our administrative assistant works closely with the Foundation executive director, handles administrative duties and provides board support that enables our office to operate efficiently. This position also works with the Foundation team to support our language revitalization program, scholarship programs, community relations and fund development.

This is a full-time position based at the Foundation office in Fairbanks.

If you or someone you know are interested in this position, please visit the Doyon, Limited employment webpage to learn more. To apply, create a Talent Bank profile on the Doyon website and then complete the online application. Applications will be accepted through Wednesday, August 23.

A conversation with Irene Solomon Arnold and Allan Hayton

IMAG2016This language champion profile features an interview with Irene Solomon Arnold (IA) and Doyon Foundation’s Language Revitalization Program Director Allan Hayton (AH).

Irene was born and raised in Tanacross, Alaska. Her mother’s side of the family is from Diihthaad. Her name was Stella Luke Solomon. Her father’s side of the family was from Saages Cheeg” (Ketchumstock). His name was Silas Solomon. Her maternal grandparents were Harry and Jennie Luke. Her paternal grandparents were Peter and Annie Solomon.

In 1992 Irene began teaching the Tanacross language in Tok, Alaska, for the Alaska Gateway School District. She completed an Associate of Applied Science in Native Language Education with the Yukon Native Language Centre at Yukon College in Whitehorse, in conjunction with the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She has been a lifelong advocate for language and cultural education for younger generations.

Tanacross is the ancestral language of the Mansfield-Ketchumstuk and Healy Lake-Joseph Village bands of Athabascan people, whose homelands extend from the Goodpaster River to the west, the Alaska Range to the south, the Fortymile and Tok Rivers to the east, and the Yukon Uplands to the north. The language is spoken in the villages of Tanacross, Dot Lake and Healy Lake and is one of nine endangered Athabascan Dene languages in the Doyon region. Efforts are underway to continue speaking, teaching and learning the language.

AH: Thank you for agreeing to be a part of Foundation’s Language Champion series. This series highlights people across Doyon region and their work in language revitalization. Doyon region has 10 languages. We are one of the only ANCSA corporations with this many languages, but I think it’s a blessing. Really, they are like riches right?

IA: Right.

AH: Riches of the land, and of the people.

IA: And we are fortunate enough to have a fluent speaker or speakers in each of these languages. That is so good to see because when I got started in the 80s, we had no idea it was going to come to this.

AH: I feel the same. When I was growing up, I didn’t expect in my own lifetime that the Gwich’in language might not continue.

IA: When I began I didn’t think I was going into the language field. When the boarding schools made me quit speaking our language, I just eradicated it from my mind.

I came back in ’66, and I really began to take interest. I wanted to know what all the grandmas and grandpas were saying. My grandmother and all of them were speaking this rapid language. I would just be blown away. I realized they’re telling interesting stories. I didn’t expect to learn it. I just wanted to hear the stories.

So there began my teaching and I didn’t know it. Grandma would say words and she would look at me, and I know then I am supposed to repeat it. I had a southern accent, a really deep Georgia accent, so that’s what made them laugh more. Except for my dad and uncle Andrew Isaac, and grandma. They didn’t laugh. They probably did, but they wouldn’t let me see it.

It went on for years. I’d ask grandma, “What they say? What they say?” And then one day, she said, I asked her, “What was that?” She said, “I can’t tell you, you have to learn it.”

In my mind I already knew how to say the words because subconsciously I was paying attention. When it was time for me to pronounce the words, it was already there. Then the more I worked at it, and listened to tapes from those old stories, and then languages and then the memory came back slowly, and the correct way to pronounce words, until finally I could sit and talk with grandma and them.

If I said something wrong, my grandma would repeat it. She wouldn’t say, “Not that way,” she would simply repeat it. Without prior instruction, she knew how to teach language. 

Listen to audio clip of Irene’s response:

AH: That’s good that you had a teacher like that.

IA: Yes, she had patience.

AH: What was that experience like when the language started coming back to you?

IA: It was like a dream. I would listen to tapes of the old folks talking, and memories would come back of where I was when I heard that story. I started comparing the different ways people spoke the language. My grandmother would tell me old words, and she made me aware that there are different dialects.

I got interested in the meaning of different words. When we were doing the Tanacross Learners’ Dictionary (Dihthaad Xt’een Aandeg’  The Mansfield People’s Language, which Irene authored with Gary Holton and Richard Thoman), I would take other dictionaries like Gwich’in and I’d find the word. I would compare them and come up with the correct word for our language.

When I started, I was working as a youth counselor, and they asked me if I would teach our language. I told them, “I don’t know how to teach.” They said, “Yes you do, you know how to counsel and do talking circle, do it that way.” And so that’s where it started, my language work.

I went to Tok UAF (University of Alaska Fairbanks) campus, and asked if there were any courses that would teach me how to be a language teacher. Because I knew there had to be something else. My students could not advance after a certain point. Eventually I found the Native language teaching at Yukon College. Avis Northway, too, she is the first recipient of the Native language certificate from Yukon College. I would use Avis a lot in my language class. And she became almost fluent in Tanacross language, and me in her language.

Together we learned you need to have one room where you dedicate it to your language class, because you put all this on your wall. All different pictures of different seasons. Just basic stuff, just put it up there, let them see it every day.

We realized children are more visual learners. We would take them outdoors, even when it’s cold, we’d take them outdoors and show them what we’re talking about. So I stayed with Tok School for three years but there was no support.

AH: When you came back in 1966 and began to hear the language again, re-familiarizing your tongue and beginning to speak, do you feel like you began to understand the way of life and belief more?

IA: Yes. In the language, I feel more as an elder, I feel more grounded, more part of a unique system now that I can think in our language. That was a breakthrough, when you start thinking in your language. That opened up a whole new world.

AH: There is research that shows children benefit from having their language in terms of their wellbeing, and health. It’s a support for all learning, to have that grounding in the language.

IA: Especially nowadays the things they are learning on TV has nothing to do with village life. And yet our young people are so involved with that television and the technological world now. It’s so different from our way of life. No wonder they’re searching, and they don’t even know they’re searching.

I think our language really needs to be in the school. At this point in time it should be well established in our school, and it’s not. I don’t know what it is, or why it’s not, because we have all the material.

So that’s my dream for our language is to get it in the school, established in the local school. And if it’s taught like that on a daily basis, it will be a big success in our schools.

Listen to audio clip of Irene’s response:

AH: Do you have a chance in your daily life to talk in your language?

IA: No, Tanacross has, let’s see, they have, there’s Mildred, fluent speakers, Nellie Probert, Mildred Jonathan, probably Jerry Isaac, probably half dozen people who can speak fluently. But there’s others too who speak and understand but they’re not fluent.

AH: It’s that way for Gwich’in too. There are younger people that can understand it, but they respond in English.

IA: You have more speakers than any language, it seems like. Because everywhere you see, you meet a Gwich’in, they speak to each other in their language.

AH: It is changing. I’m 48 now, and not getting younger.

IA: My goodness, I knew you when you were just that tall, and your mom. She used to do so much with you guys, and took you to a lot of places.

AH: Yeah, I miss her all the time.

IA: She always spoke your language with you.

AH: When I was starting to teach at the university, I would call her and ask “Amaa, jii nats’a’ts’a’ deegwiheenjyaa?”, “How do we say this?” I think about our departed loved ones, now they’re gone but I think they’re somewhere sharing stories again and reunited.

IA: Sitting by a river somewhere.

For a complete audio or written transcript of this interview, please contact the Foundation at foundation@doyon.com or 907.459.2048.

As Doyon Foundation continues to grow our language revitalization efforts in the Doyon region, we are noticing a group of people who are committed and dedicating their own time to learning and perpetuating their ancestral language. We are pleased to share some of these “Language Champion” profiles with you. If you know a language champion, please nominate him or her by contacting our language program director at haytona@doyon.com. Language champions may also complete our profile questionnaire here. You may learn more about our language revitalization program on our website.

Supported by Doyon Foundation, Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh (“Our Language Nest”) is an immersion program that teaches children to become fluent speakers of Gwich’in while helping preserve one of the world’s most threatened Indigenous languages.

Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh meets Saturdays at various sites in and around Fairbanks so that parents and children may speak Gwich’in, sing songs, share lessons and create learning activities. Virtually all activities are in Gwich’in, and the activity is free of charge.

“The group is open to everyone, but especially parents with young children,” says Allan Hayton, the Foundation’s language revitalization program director. “The goal is to teach Gwich’in to children by talking to them in the language.”

Gatherings typically attract a half-dozen or so parents and as many as 10 children. There is no fee to attend and parents also rely on the group to learn Gwich’in.

A “no-English” policy is typical of language nest immersion programs in Alaska and throughout the world. Adopting the metaphor of a nest as a safe place to learn, Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh is an early childhood education project that brings together Elders who are fluent speakers and parents and children, who typically speak English only.

Hayton began working with parents in 2015 to start Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh; today he’s among the group’s leaders, which includes parents and other community members. Partners include University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Rural Student Services and Denakkanaaga, the Fairbanks-based nonprofit organization for Native Elders. Over the years, the group has met outdoors, at parents’ homes, at Denakkanaaga and the UAF campus.

“No two Language Nest meetings are the same,” says Charlene Stern, a mother who has been involved since the group’s very first meeting. By the time her son was born, Charlene says she realized she wanted him to hear Gwich’in daily, at home. Charlene’s first language is English; her mother and siblings are fluent Gwich’in speakers.

Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh differs from teaching that introduces vocabulary in a new language by having students memorize isolated words or phrases. Some meetings involve getting together to share a meal and practice Gwich’in table phrases. Other gatherings focus on games and songs or venturing outdoors. This in-context approach teaches Gwich’in by offering everyday, appealing situations that “feed” the language into ears of young children. Two primary teachers who are fluent speakers are on hand at Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh gatherings. Parents who are second-language learners also are welcome to lead activities and lessons.

Worldwide language nest projects trace their start to 1982 and successful efforts to revive the Maori language in New Zealand. In Alaska, the nine ancestral languages of the Doyon region were the first languages spoken by the people as recently as 100 years ago. Revitalization programs like Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh can add to the number of fluent speakers and lessen the risk that the language will be lost.

“For me, one of the most important things about the Language Nest is that it creates a space where our children positively engage with our culture and language,” Charlene says. Alaska Native children typically are a minority in urban public schools, and she says Native children often experience discrimination that fosters feelings of inferiority. “Language Nest helps equip our children with stronger identities so that they become more resilient individuals and tribal members.”

Language nests such as Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh adhere to evidence-based strategies in early childhood education. For instance, research shows that up to about age 7, children acquire a second language – or third or fourth – as naturally as they learn a first language.

Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh is one of several Foundation-supported programs to revitalize Indigenous languages in the Doyon region. Efforts include the Native Word of the Month and Doyon Languages Online, the grant-funded project that is developing online lessons for five of the Doyon languages: Holikachuk, Denaakk’e, Benhti Kenaga’, Hän and Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa. Plans eventually call for online lessons in all Doyon region languages.

Charlene is among the Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh parents from families who encouraged English as a step to success in the Western world. “Today we know that speaking more than one language carries many benefits,” she says. “And we know that culture and language revitalization is critical to personal identity and collective well-being.”

She’s looking forward to a time when more families take part in Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh or similar community-driven efforts.

“We participate because it’s something that’s important to us, our children, and generations yet to come,” she says. “We can’t look to organizations, school districts or government grants to singlehandedly revitalize the Gwich’in language. I believe it’s up to us.”

For more information on Diiginjik K’yaa Ch’at’oh and how to get involved in the Language Nest, please contact Allan Hayton at 907.459.2162 or haytona@doyon.com.

“Xisrigidisddhinh … so grateful. I absolutely loved spending time with Elders and learners speaking Deg Xinag. It was invaluable to me.” –LaVerne Demientieff, PhD, Doyon Foundation Board Member

Language speakers, teachers, learners and those interested in revitalizing Deg Xinag and Holikachuk languages gathered in Holy Cross June 4 – 7. The gathering, sponsored by Doyon Foundation with support from the Administration for Native Americans, began with dinner at the Holy Cross School on Sunday evening, and continued Monday through Wednesday, overlapping with the 2017 Denakkanaaga Elders and Youth Conference.

Elders gather in the Holy Cross school library to share language and stories

Elders gather in the Holy Cross school library to share language and stories.

Deg Xinag is the traditional language of Deg Hit’an Athabaskans in four villages on the Lower Yukon River: Shageluk, Anvik, Holy Cross and Grayling. Holikachuk is the traditional language of the former village of the same name on the Innoko River. In 1962, residents of Holikachuk relocated to Grayling on the Lower Yukon River.

Deg Xinag and Holikachuk languages are among the most endangered in the Doyon region. The remaining speakers of each can all be known by first name only, and most were present at the gathering in Holy Cross.

The gathering brought together Elders, speakers, teachers, learners and other stakeholders to create momentum for current and future language revitalization initiatives in the Doyon region. Elders and speakers in attendance included Edna Deacon, Mary Deacon, Jim Dementi, Daisy Demientieff and Elizabeth Keating, along with University of Alaska Southeast linguist Alice Taff, and teachers and learners Donna MacAlpine, Jeanette Dementi, LaVerne Demientieff, Sonta Hamilton Roach and Kyle Worl. Doyon Languages Online content creators Susan Paskvan and Bev Kokrine, and Doyon Foundation board member and language revitalization committee chair Paul Mountain were also in attendance.

Participants playing the table top language learning game led by Susan Paskvan

Participants playing the table top language learning game led by Susan Paskvan.

Elder Elizabeth Keating, who grew up in the village of Holikachuk before it was relocated to present day Grayling, and who spoke Holikachuk fluently until her teenage years, shared eloquent words about her time at the gathering. “It was a powerful and sometimes emotional experience for me,” she said. “First time in a long time that I’ve been involved where everyone was speaking my language. It dredged up memories and emotions in a wholesome way. I am more dedicated than ever to revitalizing the language.” The process of delving into ancestral language can be a profound and life-changing endeavor for those with a passion to learn, as evidenced by Elizabeth’s and others’ comments during the gathering.

The goal of the gathering was to create a call to action, develop practical steps toward long-range goals, and share inspiration and hope around language revitalization. The event created a space for learners to ask Elders questions about the language, and for Elders to share their knowledge and experience with learners. For many, language provides a source of connection with departed loved ones, with the culture, with one another, and with the land. Edna Deacon shared that when she has difficulty recalling a word or phrase, she will silently ask her late father, and in time it will come to her as though he were “whispering in her ear.”

The focus on Indigenous language over several days was particularly meaningful in this community, former home to the Holy Cross Mission Orphanage where oppression of Alaska Native language and culture was a common practice and whose repercussions are still felt very strongly generations later. Read more in the article “The Last Orphans of Holy Cross” by Mary Annette Pember.

Holy Cross village from the cross on the hill

Holy Cross village from the cross on the hill.

LaVerne Demientieff, Ph.D., a professor in social work at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a Doyon Foundation board member, has drawn connections between language learning and healing from trauma. “When people experience trauma it can be hard to regulate our nervous system, feel safe, trust, connect with others, build relationships, etc. It is always a work in progress to ‘feel normal,’ or what we perceive ‘normal’ to be. This directly relates to language in my understanding and experience and it is why there should be love, safety and strengths that are included in language revitalization efforts.”  

A wonderful outcome of the gathering in Holy Cross was the formation of a language-learning group that will continue to meet regularly. Demientieff, who is also a Foundation language committee member, shared her commitment to moving forward. “My personal goals are to listen daily to language via audio and maybe take a linguistics class or two. I am open to writing about language, working on language activities, like documentation, preservation of older materials, working with community and being a part of Deg Xinag language classes,” she stated. The group will meet via teleconference, and is open to anyone interested in learning Deg Xinag.

For more information on the gathering, the language revitalization program, or the newly formed language-learning group, please contact Allan Hayton, Doyon Foundation language revitalization program director, at 907.459.2162 or haytona@doyon.com.

See more photos from the gathering on the Foundation’s Facebook page.

Missed the language gathering? Check out these video clip highlights from the event:

 

Last call!
Date – August 11-13, 2017
Location – Camp Bingle on Harding Lake

  • Airfare for Yukon Koyukuk School District Students & meals are included
  • Overnight at camp Friday – Sunday
  • Open to youth entering grades 8-12

For more information contact Andrea Durny at adurny@yksd.com or (907) 374-9424.

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Doyon Foundation, with the support of the golfers, sponsors, planning committee, staff and volunteers, held another successful Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic June 22 – 23 in Fairbanks, Alaska. In addition to raising money for the Foundation’s Morris Thompson Scholarship Fund, the popular annual event also honored the memory of the late Morris Thompson.

“Morris was an enthusiastic and tireless supporter of education, and we are honored to hold this event in his memory,” said Doris Miller, Foundation executive director. “The Morris Thompson Scholarship Fund was established to provide scholarships to students who exhibit the qualities we admired most in Morris – vision, dedication to excellence, exemplary leadership and integrity.”

The 17th annual event kicked off Thursday, June 22 with a skills tournament warm-up at Chena Bend Golf Course on Fort Wainwright, followed by a reception and Calcutta at Wedgewood Resort. See the skills tournament results on the Foundation website.

AS MF

Aaron Schutt and Marissa Flannery announce the new competitive scholarship for law students at the Calcutta reception.

The reception featured two very special moments. The first was when Doyon, Limited President and CEO Aaron Schutt took the stage with his wife, Marissa Flannery, to announce the establishment of an endowment for a new competitive scholarship for aspiring young lawyers.

Both graduates of Stanford Law School, the couple partnered with the Doyon, Limited board to help establish the new scholarship fund, making a five-year commitment to getting the scholarship in place.

“I know very well the cost and benefits a legal degree can have for Native students,” said Flannery, who said she and her husband each graduated with more than $100,000 in student loan debts. “We’ve never regretted our choice, and we hope that other students will make that choice.”

Annie

Student speaker Annie Sanford addresses reception guests.

Student speaker Annie Sanford of Tok, Alaska, then shared her story, giving the audience a real-life example of how their support makes a difference in the lives of students.

“Let’s see if I learned anything from my communications class I took last semester,” Sanford quipped at the start of her speech, drawing encouraging laughter from the filled room.

“Normally I don’t volunteer myself to give speeches, but I felt it was important to express how important of a role Doyon Foundation has played in my higher education,” continued Sanford, who is pursuing an associate’s degree at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and hopes to join the university’s very competitive radiologic technology program in 2018. Her post-graduate plans include staying in Fairbanks to give back to the community that has given her so much.

“I feel like Doyon Foundation is a third proud parent in my pursuit of a higher education,” Sanford said. “I want to thank Doyon Foundation and their sponsors for supporting not only me but students across Alaska pursuing our educational dreams.” Read more about Sanford on the Foundation’s blog and see a video of her speech on the Foundation YouTube channel.

The evening concluded with a spirited Calcutta, where teams and members of the audience bid on the teams they thought would win the golf tournament the next day. Always a popular event, the Calcutta brought in more than $50,000, which was split between the winning bidders and the Foundation scholarship fund.

The festivities continued on Friday, June 23 with the golf tournament, which drew 33 teams of four players each. By early afternoon, the teams had finished the 18 holes at Chena Bend and were celebrating at the golf banquet.

2017 winning team

First-place team at the 2017 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic.

Congratulations to the first-place team comprised of Rick Boyles, Dan Clark, Rob Graves and Scott Jepsen. See the full list of winners on the Foundation website.

“Thank you to the golfers, sponsors and volunteers for bringing your great energy and fun to the tournament this year,” Miller said. “We couldn’t have asked for better conditions and fundraising results. Thanks for your continued support and generosity.”

This year marked the 17th year of the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic. Since inception, the event has enabled the Foundation to award 173 students with Morris Thompson scholarships totaling $370,180.

For more information on Doyon Foundation or the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, visit www.doyonfoundation.com.

See below for our August Native word of the month in Gwich’in!

Zhehk’aa – Family
Shizhehk’aa naii gwiintł’oo goovihtsai’. – I cherish my family very much.

Listen to an audio recording.

August

Hai’ (thank you) to Allan Hayton for providing this month’s translation.

Have a translation in another language? Share it with us on Facebook!

Each month, a new Native word or phrase and definition will be shared on our website, as well as on our blog and Facebook page, along with an audio recording of the pronunciation.

Have an idea for a Native Word of the Month? Please email your idea to haytona@doyon.com.

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