alumni


Born in Fairbanks and raised in Hughes, Tanya Kaquatosh is the daughter of Barbara and the late Norman Bifelt Beatus of Hughes. Tanya’s maternal grandparents are Johnson and the late Bertha Moses of Allakaket, and her paternal grandparents are Sophie and Henry Beatus of Hughes.Tanya K headshot

A graduate of Stanford University and Arizona State University, Tanya Kaquatosh was named regulatory affairs director for Doyon Utilities in 2015, a position she accepted after joining the Fairbanks-based company in 2012. She earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Stanford in 2003 and a master’s degree in business administration from Arizona State in 2013.

Tanya received Doyon Foundation’s basic scholarship as well as the Morris Thompson scholarship, a competitive award honoring the late Alaska Native leader and former chief executive of Doyon, Limited. Tanya credits the Foundation for help throughout her college career.

“The staff was always supportive and accommodating,” she recalls. “Doyon Foundation helped me advance my education not only with financial support but with encouragement. My affiliation with Doyon has allowed me to grow my educational and professional network.”

Tanya’s professional life is a lesson in steady advances. After earning her undergraduate degree, she went to work at Stanford in the financial aid office, where students seek help to fund their college education. She also worked as a barista in the Bay Area before moving to Fairbanks where she was employed from 2006 to 2008 as the cultural program coordinator at the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center. Tanya developed the vision for Alaska Native cultural programming at the center, which opened in Fairbanks in 2008. The center upholds Morris Thompson’s legacy by promoting improved understanding between Alaska Native and non-Native communities.

In 2008, Tanya was named executive assistant to the president of Doyon, Limited – a job she held until joining Doyon Utilities in 2012 as a financial specialist. Her promotion in 2015 to regulatory affairs director involves her in utility rate filings, revenue requirements and other tariff matters.

Her undergraduate years taught her the value of asking for help.

“Oftentimes we don’t ask even though there are many good people who are willing and able to assist with tutoring, mentoring, encouragement, or informal and formal counseling,” Tanya says.

Her top tip for students is to take care of their mental and physical well-being. For instance, while earning her master’s degree Tanya worked full time and attended to life as a wife and mother. But she says that period seemed more balanced than her undergraduate days: “The stresses of schoolwork were much more manageable because I took better care of myself.”

Her focus today includes family life with her husband, Steve Kaquatosh, and children, 10-year-old Skye and stepdaughter Kaytona, 15. Tanya enjoys reading, exercise, travel and volunteering in school-based civic projects, such as We The People and Kids Voting. “I love supporting our youth and education,” says Tanya. She also has volunteered with the Alaska Native Education Parent Advisory Committee, a group within the Fairbanks North Star Borough School District.

In addition to pursuing her career with Doyon Utilities, Tanya’s goals include learning to speak Denaakk’e (Koyukon). Tanya, who is both Koyukon Athabascan and Inupiaq Eskimo, was named Aluqsi after her great-great grandmother, Ida Beatus, who was Koyukon.

“She was given the name Aluqsi by the Inupiaq people,” Tanya recalls. In English the name translates as “warm person.”

Sierra Evans is the daughter of Glenn and Tami Evans of Manley Hot Springs and Nenana; her grandparents are Thomas and Gwen Evans of Rampart, and Wayne and Marion Taylor of Nenana. Her hometown is Palmer.

SierraSierra earned Doyon Foundation scholarships for four straight years before graduating in 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in finance and economics from Grand Canyon University (GCU) in Arizona. She’s employed today in Los Angeles as an analyst with the global financial company Willis Tower Watson, and credits the Foundation for scholarship help so that she could go to school in Arizona.

“It isn’t easy to stay motivated to make your dreams a reality when you’re far from home,” she says. “My family was extremely supportive. Doyon Foundation scholarships helped immensely.”

Returning home to Alaska helped too. To earn money to stay in school, Sierra worked three summers in a row at Kantishna Roadhouse, the Denali National Park backcountry lodge operated by Doyon Tourism, a subsidiary of Doyon, Limited.

Her goals include continuing her finance career and enrolling in a master’s program in psychology at GCU. She plans to eventually earn a doctorate and pursue a psychology career.

Sierra says that volunteer and community work are important stepping-stones to rewarding work after college graduation. A four-year member of her university’s business club, she served as president for two years when the GCU club was the largest of its kind in Arizona. Competitions in Atlanta and Washington, D.C., expanded her network, as did working for the chair of the business department at her university.

When she learned that Arizona has among the highest rates of high school dropouts, Sierra presented a talk on the importance of earning a high school diploma and planning for college. Volunteer work also helped distinguish her resume; Sierra earned several awards, including being named among the top 10 future business executives in a nationwide competition.

Job interviews found her ready to answer questions based on real-world experience as a student worker and business club president. “Getting involved in volunteer work and work for GCU was the best decision I made,” she says. “The more involved you are, the more opportunities you have.”

DF_18_Student Dinner Promotion_blogWant to learn how to budget as a college student? Interested in a career in finance? Come learn from some financial experts and Doyon Foundation alumni who have been in your shoes at our upcoming Student $ucce$$ Dinner in Fairbanks! All Doyon Foundation students, alumni, family, friends and other supporters are welcome to attend this free event.

Thursday, February 22

5:30 p.m.

University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Rural Student Services Gathering Room

RSVP by Wednesday, February 21

WWW.PHOTOGRAPHIKALASVEGAS.COM

The evening will feature a presentation, titled Taxes and Financial Planning for College Students, by Doyon Foundation accountant, Kelly Ward, CPA. Kelly, who is the co-owner of the certified public accounting firm Robinson & Ward, will discuss common tax situations for college students, financial planning opportunities and the importance of budgeting.

We’ll also hear from three Foundation alumni, who will share about their educational journey and career experiences. Joining us are:

Bruce

Bruce Miller. Bruce graduated with a bachelor’s degree in geography and a minor in economics in 1991. He went on to receive a Bachelor of Business Administration with an HR focus in 1992. Bruce, who has worked at Doyon, Limited for nearly 26 years, is currently the senior risk management analyst for the corporation.

 

Abigail Riggs portrait

Abigail Riggs, CPA. Abigail graduated from UAF in 2010 with a Bachelor of Business Administration in accounting. The following year, she graduated with an MBA with an emphasis in capital markets. She became a certified public accountant in 2014, and currently serves as the finance manager at Doyon, Limited.

 

JulieJulie Biddle. Julie is Gwich’in/Navajo, originally from Fort Yukon. She received her bachelor’s degree in business economics from UC Santa Barbara and her MBA with an emphasis in capital markets from UAF. She worked for Doyon, Limited for 20 years, starting in an entry-level communications position before being promoted to vice president of shareholder services. After receiving her MBA, Julie worked for Doyon as a financial analyst. She recently began work for the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments, a consortium of 10 tribal governments in the Yukon Flats, overseeing the Native American Career and Technical Education Program. She is also a member of the grants management and compliance team.

Are you a Foundation alumni? If so, please consider bringing a door prize donation or a dish to share. Let us know what you can bring when you RSVP.

 

Doyon Foundation Students!

Are you a Doyon Foundation graduate with an English or other writing-focused major?  Doyon, Limited has a position for you!

As Board Administrator, the employee will provide support for board meetings, proofread and prepare board meeting materials, serve as the recording secretary and provide confidential administrative assistance within the Legal Department.

Click HERE for more information or to apply.

The 2018 Pick. Click. Give. campaign kicks off Monday, January 1, with the opening of the Alaska PFD application period. We encourage you to consider Pick. Click. Giving to Doyon Foundation when completing your PFD application. The PFD application period runs January 1 – March 31, 2018. Alaskans can apply online at www.pfd.alaska.gov.

student with checkFunds from Pick. Click. Give. directly benefit the Foundation’s student scholarships and support programs, as well as the efforts of our language revitalization program.

Last year, 57 donors contributed $3,975 to support Foundation scholarships. While we are very grateful for all support, last year’s Pick. Click. Give. total was a significant decrease from previous years.

Since the Foundation was established in 1989, we have awarded more than $6 million in scholarships to thousands of high school, vocational and college students pursuing their educational goals and striving to achieve their life dreams. Many of these students have shared that they simply would not have been able to attend college without the support of the Foundation. Yet with that support, they have gone on to become doctors, lawyers, teachers and leaders in our communities, setting positive examples for future generations of students to follow.
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But the support of the Foundation is more than just financial. Homesick students far from family have found comfort in the support of Foundation staff and alumni, and at events designed to celebrate and connect students and Foundation supporters. We also strive to help students develop a deeper connection with and pride in their rich Native culture.
Elder and youth recording Native language translationsIn addition to scholarships, the Foundation also places emphasis on celebrating and revitalizing Native culture. Through our language revitalization program, and Doyon Languages Online project, we are currently developing hundreds of online language-learning lessons for nine of the 10 Doyon region languages.

For more information on Doyon Foundation, contact foundation@doyon.com or 907-459-2048, or visit www.doyonfoundation.com. For more information on Pick. Click. Give., visit www.pickclickgive.org.
 

A Doyon Foundation scholarship recipient who graduated from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 2016, Raymond Kangas is the son of Irene and Gary Kangas of Fairbanks. His paternal grandparents are Nora and Al Kangas of Ruby; his maternal grandparents are Martha and Franklin Dayton of Koyukuk.

Raymond KangasWhen Raymond Kangas looks back on his college years, he has a hard time counting up all the people who helped him get where he is today. A mechanical engineer since 2016 with Anchorage-based Doyon Anvil, Raymond received Doyon Foundation scholarships while earning his bachelor’s degree from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Classes in fluid mechanics and arctic engineering were key – along with a work ethic instilled in him since childhood and fish camp days with his family on the Yukon River.

“My family gave me stability, with my parents being the anchors,” he says. Inspiring professors and study group friends helped. And he says, “Thanks to the Doyon Foundation scholarship program, (Doyon, Limited) annual dividends, and overall encouragement to see shareholders progress, the Doyon family certainly has played a role in seeing Athabascans succeed in competitive occupations.

Raymond, 24, is one of numerous classroom-to-career professionals who benefit from Doyon Foundation college scholarships before going on to employment with Doyon, Limited companies. It’s a trend that advances Doyon’s core values because in addition to knowledge, skills and talent, shareholders apply traditional values as they collaborate with clients worldwide.

“Creating a means for shareholders to potentially work for Doyon improves their economic well-being,” says Terry Caetano, president and general manager of Doyon Anvil. “It’s also a key part of the mission on which the company was founded.”

With offices in California, Montana and Washington state, Doyon Anvil is a multi-discipline engineering and design firm offering process safety/risk management; project management; and construction coordination support services. Doyon Anvil projects include upstream oil production, including North Slope expertise; pipeline and terminal work throughout Alaska, the Rocky Mountain region and Pacific Northwest; and power generation in Alaska, Canada and the Pacific Northwest.

Terry says that in addition to seeking out smart, motivated people, what he values in new hires is a desire to solve complex problems and keep learning. “That’s what I saw in Raymond,” Terry says.

Doyon Anvil is Raymond’s first engineering job out of college, and among things he enjoys is the chance to work on a variety projects requiring different skills. For instance, a typical workday may involve a facility where new piping is needed; Raymond’s role includes working with piping designers to prepare a complete work package – from checking compliance with specifications and reviewing drawings to putting together a material requisition to purchase components. If needed, he also completes a stress analysis on the design.

Raymond advises college students seeking to join professional ranks at Doyon subsidiaries to stay focused in the early stages of their education.

“Being awarded scholarships and getting selected for a job position are some of the things that are out of your control,” he says. “What you can control is the effort you put into your education. The first step in any career is being qualified.”

Are you a former Doyon Foundation scholarship recipient working today in the Doyon, Limited Family of Companies? We’d like to feature your story! Please send email to foundation@doyon.com and we’ll be in touch. Thanks!

Doyon Foundation is pleased to announce a new scholarship fund, the Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr. Leadership Fund, established by their daughter, Jennifer Fate. Jennifer, a member of both the Doyon, Limited and Doyon Foundation boards, created the fund to honor Mary Jane and Hugh’s accomplishments for the betterment of the Doyon people.

IMG_2992-001“There are many kinds of leadership. There’s community leadership, business leadership, educational leadership and the kind of leadership that stands up and says difficult truths out loud,” Jennifer said. “This fund is in honor of my parents, Mary Jane and Bud Fate. In their 65-year love story, they lived all of these types of leadership.”

“This fund celebrates those who strive to make our community a better place and our people, a stronger and healthier people,” Jennifer added. “It’s a fund that also recognizes the importance of those who bring leadership to healing past traumas, stopping current abuses and reshaping lives.”

Mary Jane’s life has been a positive example of leadership and involvement in her Alaska Native community. Overcoming adversity at a young age, Mary Jane understood the significance of cultural support and community involvement. Through practicing her Athabascan subsistence traditions, through embracing leadership, and with the resilient support of her husband, Hugh, Mary Jane became one of the most inspirational and motivating Alaska Native leaders of her generation.

Both Mary Jane and Hugh dedicated their lives to the betterment of the Alaska Native and Doyon region people. They were co-founders of the Fairbanks Native Association, mentored many Alaska Natives and Doyon region peoples, and provided dental health services throughout rural interior villages, traveling by small plane to villages where no dental services existed. Mary Jane served as the first female co-chair of the Alaska Federation of Natives, president of Baan O Yeel Kon Village Corporation, and on numerous other boards and commissions.

“We are grateful for the example set by Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr., and we are grateful for Jennifer’s generosity in establishing this scholarship, which will make it possible for future Alaska Native leaders to get the education they need to carry the torch forward into the next generation,” said Doris Miller, Doyon Foundation executive director.

Doyon shareholders studying health care, mental health care, business or any profession that contributes to the greater Alaska Native business, cultural or social community will be eligible for the new scholarship. Funds may be used for college, graduate school, post-secondary education, vocational or certificate programs. Preference will be given to students overcoming adversity or intending to enter a profession that contributes to the social or economic well-being of the Alaska Native community.

The first scholarship from the fund will be a basic scholarship awarded in spring 2018. The deadline for the spring 2018 scholarships has passed. A competitive scholarship will also be awarded in academic year 2018 – 2019. The next competitive scholarship application deadline is Tuesday, May 15, 2018, for scholarships for the 2018 – 2019 academic year.

“Please encourage Doyon shareholders working on a degree or vocation in business, education, mental health and health, substance abuse counseling, or spiritual and cultural training to apply for this scholarship. And thank you to the many leaders out there. Anaa Basee’,” Jennifer said.

Contributions from other donors to the Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr. Leadership Fund are welcome. Secure online donations may be made on the Foundation website; be sure to note “Fate leadership scholarship” in the “special instructions” box. Donations may also be made by mailing a check to Doyon Foundation at 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. Please note “Fate leadership scholarship” in the memo line.

For more information about Doyon Foundation, scholarship eligibility and application instructions, or opportunities to support students, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

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