Doyon Foundation Events


2021 Scholarship Award Recognition Video Premiere September 10

Join Doyon Foundation to celebrate the start of a new school year and recognize our fall 2021 scholarship recipients! Mark your calendar and plan to tune in for the virtual premiere of our 2021 scholarship award recognition video on Friday, September 10 at 1 p.m. AKDT. The video will premiere on our Facebook page, and also be posted to our YouTube channel for viewing later. RSVP to our Facebook event or add the event to your calendar!

We’ll have welcomes from Doyon, Limited and Doyon Foundation leaders, a special prayer for students, words of inspiration and encouragement from a student speaker, announcement of all our fall 2021 basic and competitive recipients, and recognition of our donors, who make our scholarships possible.

Be sure to watch until the very end, when we draw the names of the 20 students selected to receive Lenovo ThinkPads, generously donated by designDATA and the Google American Indian Network. If you are a Doyon Foundation student who needs a computer for school, be sure to complete our need survey by Friday, August 27, at 5 p.m. We will then review the submissions and eligible students will be entered into a random drawing, with the winners announced at the end of our scholarship award recognition video on September 10.

We hope to see you at the premiere on September 10 to celebrate the start of the school year and our 2021 – 2022 our scholarship recipients. Remember to RSVP to our Facebook event or add the event to your calendar!

This year, Doyon Foundation is partnering with the Great Alaska Duck Race, which takes place in Anchorage on September 11. (Please note this duck race is separate from the Rubber Duckie Race in Fairbanks!)

The event is organized by Alaska EXCEL, a nonprofit providing educational opportunities to rural Alaska youth. For every duck we sell, Doyon Foundation will receive half of the proceeds, which will go to support our scholarship program. Visit our fundraising page to buy a duck and help us earn some bucks!

Duck race tickets range from $10 to $20, and the grand prize is $10,000! Last year, there were winners from all over the state. In fact, the $10,000 grand prize was won by a woman in Fairbanks! Only 12,000 tickets will be sold, so don’t wait – get your tickets today on our fundraising page, https://bit.ly/DoyonFoundationDuckRace.

$10 ticket prizes:

  • 1st place duck wins $5,000
  • 2nd place duck wins $500
  • 3rd place duck wins $250 

$20 ticket prizes:

  • GRAND PRIZE duck wins $10,000 
  • 2nd place duck wins $1,000
  • 3rd place duck wins $500

Winners don’t need to be present to win, but if you want to join in the fun, be at Ship Creek in downtown Anchorage on Saturday, September 11 at 11 a.m. If you can’t attend in person, you can watch the livestream on the race website!

We’re also looking for volunteers to help us meet our volunteer commitment as an event partner. Volunteer opportunities include:

  • Selling duck race tickets at the Alaska State Fair in Palmer, three-hour shift on a day of your choosing from August 20 to September 6, two volunteers needed
  • Tagging ducks at a TBA location in Anchorage, September 9, 3 – 7 p.m., at least one volunteer needed
  • Race set up or clean up, Ship Creek in Anchorage, September 11, 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., at least one volunteer needed

If you are interested in volunteering, please call 907.459.2048 or email foundation@doyon.com with your preferred date, time and any questions.

Thank you for your support. Go buy a duck – and good luck!

More than $130,000 raised for scholarships at June 17 event

Doyon Foundation supporters came together to raise money for scholarships at the 2021 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, which marked the 20th anniversary of the fundraiser.

After a year hiatus due to the pandemic, the event returned with strong support, including 116 golfers on 29 teams, more than 60 sponsors and more than 50 volunteers. The 2021 golf classic, held June 17 in Fairbanks, raised approximately $131,000 for the Morris Thompson competitive scholarship fund, named in memory of the late Morris Thompson, who served as president and CEO of Doyon, Limited from 1985 – 2000.

The 2021 golf classic took place at Chena Bend Golf Course on Fort Wainwright, where team 15 (Drew Mazzolini, Kirk Butcher, Andrew Honea and Paul Mazzolini) and team 30 (Connie Johnson, Martha Hanlon, Dee Liebl and Janette Smith) tied for first place.

The festivities continued at Pike’s Landing, where donors showed their generosity at the Fund the Future live donation event, and live and silent auctions, which featured items including a stay at Peppermill Resort, a Holland America cruise and a Denali getaway.

Attendees also heard from student speaker, Sheena Tanner, who graduated in December 2020 with her master’s degree in public administration from the University of Alaska Southeast.

Sheena shared how watching her mother obtain a degree inspired her own educational journey. “My mother graduated from UAF with her teaching degree when I was 8 years old,” she said. “Seeing the process firsthand of how beneficial an education is inspired me to earn my degree and start my career in a field that I am passionate about.”

Sheena took her time choosing her educational direction and completing her degrees. “I knew that my strengths were in organization and writing but I wasn’t ready to choose a degree program (after graduating high school),” she said. “I learned not to be impatient when it comes to my education and to assess my workload and move forward with what my schedule allowed.”

Her patience and persistence paid off, as Sheena now holds an Associate of Arts degree and a bachelor’s in criminal justice, in addition to her master’s degree. Doyon Foundation scholarships helped her along the way. “Because I was receiving a scholarship from Doyon Foundation, I used that as a driving force to get my work done, especially when the going got tough,” she said. “I would tell myself that I’m not just doing this for myself, I have others depending on me and others that have invested in me. It was a good reminder to keep moving forward.”

Today, Sheena encourages those around her to keep moving forward with their own education, including her niece, daughter and husband, who are all enrolled in programs at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

“I’m so proud of my niece, daughter and husband, and especially thankful for Doyon Foundation and all of those who have contributed to the Foundation, as those contributions help to make educational goals possible,” Sheena said. “Education can lead to opportunities.”

The Foundation extends a special thank you to major sponsors KeyBank, Key Equipment Finance, Doyon Family of Companies and Council Tree Investors, as well as Robin Renfroe and Howie Thies, who celebrated 20 years of volunteering, and golfer Woody Wallis, who has participated in 19 of 20 golf classic events.

Since inception, proceeds from the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic have provided 214 scholarships totaling $556,180 to higher education students, including 2020 – 2021 recipients: Shane Derendoff, Cory LePore, Hannah Bagot, Andrianna Albert, and Calee Stark

The golf classic will return to a two-day format next year, with events taking place Thursday and Friday, June 23 and 24, 2022. Watch the Foundation website, www.doyonfoundation.com, for 2022 event information or contact 907.459.2000 or golf@doyon.com with questions. 

After more than a year of being unable to meet in person, Doyon Foundation hosted an ANEP Language Gathering in Tok in early June 2021.

The goal of the three-day gathering was to record audio for use in Nee’aanèegn’ (Upper Tanana) and Dihthaad Xt’een Iin Aanděeg’ (Tanacross) courses being developed as part of the Foundation’s Doyon Languages Online project.

The majority of the necessary audio files were recorded during the recent gathering. As next steps, the Foundation will arrange to bring language teams to Fairbanks to finish out the audio recordings and begin video recordings.

We thank the language gathering participants, including Glen Demit, Cora Demit, Verna Hagen, Irene Arnold, Polly Hyslop and Chance Shank, as well as volunteer Annastasia Johnson, for sharing their time and knowledge.

Once completed, the Nee’aanèegn’ (Upper Tanana) and Dihthaad Xt’een Iin Aanděeg’ (Tanacross) courses will join the currently available Doyon Languages Online courses in Benhti Kokhut’ana Kenaga’ (Lower Tanana), Denaakk’e (Koyukon), Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in) and Holikachuk, as well as a special Hän course based on the work of the late Isaac Juneby. Additional courses in Hän, Deg Xinag and Denak’i (Upper Kuskokwim) are also in development.

Doyon Languages Online courses are available for free to all interested learners who want to learn the endangered languages of the Doyon region. Learn more at www.doyonfoundation.com/dlo.

“Goals influence all of your decisions”

In honor of our 2021 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, we’d like to introduce you to another one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Shane Derendoff. This is the last in our series of student profiles highlighting our 2020 – 2021 Morris Thompson students and honoring their hard work and achievements, leading up to the event on June 17. For 20 years, the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic has raised money for student scholarships while honoring the memory of inspirational Native leader, the late Morris Thompson.

A software developer based in North Pole, Shane Derendoff is the son of Cece Derendoff-Nollner and Francis Nollner, both of Huslia. His maternal grandparents are Angeline Happy and Richard Derendoff, both of Cutoff-Huslia. Cutoff, a flood-prone site, was established in the 1920s and eventually relocated to the area known today as Huslia.

Shane has served as president of the Doyon Foundation board and is a past director of the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitor Center in Fairbanks. His hometown is the Koyukon Athabascan community of Huslia.

Shane Derendoff believes that setting goals for yourself — including goals that others may consider far-fetched — are a key to steady success.

“It never hurts to ask,” he said. “These goals influence all of your decisions from that point forward, most times subconsciously.” Pursuing higher education is among self-assigned goals he values, but he’s realistic about obstacles.

“My challenge has been to keep motivated, to keep pushing to completion,” he said. “Often it’s easier to just get a job and make a wage. But sticking to your educational goals will pay long-term dividends and raise your potential career ceiling.”

Shane earned a bachelor of science degree in 1998 from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where he was a recipient of Doyon Foundation scholarships. Before enrolling in the master’s of business administration (MBA) program at Alaska Pacific University (APU), where his emphasis is information technology, he served as technical service manager at Fairbanks Memorial Hospital and owned Koyukon Consulting. He anticipates graduating from APU in 2022.

After completing his undergraduate degree, Shane went on to volunteer for several years on the Doyon Foundation board. “I gained key nonprofit experience,” he said. “Once I started my MBA, Doyon Foundation has funded me each step of the way.”

Shane plans to continue working as a software developer while attending APU and then start a consulting practice after graduation. His interests are management and nonprofit and leadership training. He enjoys seeking out other professionals whose early-career experiences mesh with his own. And he makes time for traditional activities such as hunting, wood-cutting and helping Elders.

“Doyon Foundation has been a key part of my educational and professional background,” he said.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. The 20th annual golf classic will take place Thursday, June 17, 2021, in Fairbanks. To learn more, visit the Foundation website or contact golf@doyon.com.  

Doyon Foundation scholarships help me share diversity within health care-related discussions”

– Hannah Bagot

In honor of our upcoming 2021 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, we’d like to introduce you to another one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Hannah Bagot. This is the latest in our series of student profiles highlighting our 2020 – 2021 Morris Thompson students and honoring their hard work and achievements, leading up to the event on June 17. For 20 years, the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic has raised money for student scholarships while honoring the memory of inspirational Native leader, the late Morris Thompson.

A graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Hannah Bagot is the daughter of Michael and Helen Bagot. Hannah recently completed a master’s degree in health care administration and graduated in May 2021. Her hometown is Pleasanton, California.

Hannah recalls searching out college programs to find one that matched her goals. It’s a path familiar to many students on their way to a rewarding career.

“I explored other majors in health care but they never seemed to be the right fit,” Hannah said, adding that obstacles like these can feel like failure.

“But through volunteering, working and internships, I eventually came to find the right profession for me,” she said. Hannah has volunteered at hospitals in North Carolina and in Utah, where she worked with a physical fitness program for children with special needs.

“My biggest piece of advice for other students is to take opportunities and try new things even if they’re not in your scope of interest or field of study. Everything can be a learning experience,” she said.

“You never know where you will pick up new skills, meet new people, or discover new passions. Try not to compare yourself with others.”

Scholarships from Doyon Foundation have helped Hannah attend schools to gain professional and academic skills for success in health care. “Doyon Foundation has made it possible for me to pursue a graduate degree in a field I’m passionate about,” she said. “Doyon Foundation scholarships have given me the opportunity to share diversity within health care-related discussions.”

After her recent graduation in May 2021, Hannah’s plans include serving as the Health Policy and Management Fellow for Hoag Hospital and Orthopedic Institute in Orange County, California.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. The 20th annual golf classic will take place Thursday, June 17, 2021, in Fairbanks. There are still opportunities to support the event as a sponsor or volunteer; to learn more and get involved, visit the Foundation website or contact golf@doyon.com.  

“Doyon Foundation has made my dreams possible”

In honor of our upcoming 2021 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, we’d like to introduce you to another one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Calee Stark. This is the latest in our series of student profiles highlighting our 2020 – 2021 Morris Thompson students and honoring their hard work and achievements, leading up to the event on June 17. For 20 years, the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic has raised money for student scholarships while honoring the memory of inspirational Native leader, the late Morris Thompson.

An undergraduate at the University of Washington (UW), Calee Stark is the daughter of Emily Pitka of Fairbanks, Alaska, and Wes Stark, raised in Phoenix, Arizona. Calee plans to study psychology with the goal of becoming a physician assistant following her graduation from UW in 2023. Her hometown is Fairbanks.

As a student with an interest in autism, Calee Stark believes that one of the best things about her career field – health care – is that it doesn’t yet have all the answers. “Many things remain unknown that we can one day hope to discover,” she says.

Calee traces her commitment to medicine after witnessing care extended to an uncle who was treated for cancer. “Watching the nurses and physicians attempt to do everything they could inspired me to want to improve the level of care in the future,” she shares.

Her short-term goal includes continuing her work as a certified nursing assistant at a Seattle nursing home and eventually serving her community as a physician assistant (PA) in hospitals. Working under a doctor’s supervision, PAs often are among the first medical staff that a patient meets. Physician assistants may examine and diagnose injury or illness, treat and educate patients, and prescribe medicine, among other primary care duties undertaken by doctors.

“Doyon Foundation has made my dreams of working in the medical field possible,” Calee says. “It allowed me to focus on my studies and not stress about how to afford my education. I’m beyond grateful for that.”

A member of organizations aimed at advancing the interests of Indigenous students, Calee belongs to First Nations at UW, an intertribal group focusing on culture and traditions, and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Her future plans include taking part in a clinical internship with Apex Summer Camp through the UW Autism Center. The camp offers student interns a chance to gain research insight while it helps children build social and behavioral skills.

Calee, who graduated from high school in 2019, says that college students who encounter challenging courses may benefit from re-thinking what they’ve learned about learning: Strategies that served her well in high school were falling short at a competitive university that attracted other bright students.

“For a while I struggled to learn how to properly study,” she shares. “This was a challenge because I wasn’t used to asking for help.” She soon found on-campus sites for academic advising. Calee says she benefited from more efficient study habits as well as learning the rewards of asking for help. “That ended up being the solution to my problem,” she says.

Her advice to other students: Don’t be afraid to ask questions, even if you think they may sound obvious.

“If you’re struggling in a class, acknowledge that but don’t let it continue for long,” she advises. “More opportunities started lining up for me when I started to ask questions.” That led her to realize that many people are willing to help: “Just ask!” 

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. The 20th annual golf classic will take place Thursday, June 17, 2021, in Fairbanks. There are many opportunities to support the event as a sponsor, golfer or volunteer; to learn more and get involved, visit the Foundation website or contact golf@doyon.com.  

“Thank you so much for your academic support of Alaska Native students!”

– Core LePore

In honor of our upcoming 2021 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, we’d like to introduce you to one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Cory LePore. This is the latest in our series of student profiles highlighting our 2020 – 2021 Morris Thompson students and honoring their hard work and achievements, leading up to the event on June 17. For 20 years, the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic has raised money for student scholarships while honoring the memory of inspirational Native leader, the late Morris Thompson.

Cory LePore is currently an MBA student with a finance concentration at Alaska Pacific University, and will be completing his program this summer. Previously, Cory earned an undergraduate degree in economics from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) in 2018, and received his master of arts degree in economics from the University of Hawaii Manoa in spring 2020. He is a member of the International Economics Honor Society, which recognizes scholastic achievement. Originally from Bethel, Cory is the son of Cory LePore, Sr. and Cindy LePore, both of Bethel. His maternal grandparents are Beverly Turner and Thaddeus Tikiun, both of Holy Cross.

Doyon Foundation: Congratulations on receiving your master’s in economics last spring. What attracts you to that field?

Cory LePore: Our world has many economic challenges that we’re facing daily and the fact that there’s no one correct way to approach those problems is so fascinating. Studying economics provides me with skills to make an impact on those problems throughout my lifetime.

DF: Economics is famous for being a difficult field, one that requires good ability in math and statistics as well as an understanding of human behavior.

CL: My biggest challenge has been trying to find my proper way to study. I found myself trying to cram math material into my brain the night before an exam and I ended up doing subpar.

I was in my first year as undergraduate at UAF when I found a way to study that suited me. I realized I’d have to dedicate more time and effort. I tried breaking my study time into several days, usually starting a week before an exam, and then study a couple of hours a day. I saw a massive change for the better in my grades.

I found this approach by trying all sorts of study techniques. I tried studying in a group and using flash cards. I’d read and research different strategies online.

DF: Your advice to other students is to remember that teachers and advisers are there to help. How did you learn this lesson? Why do you think so many students overlook these sources of help?

CL: I think they’re afraid. Students tend to think that teachers are there to teach and that’s it. But in reality, most teachers love when you interact with them outside of class. It shows you’re willing to challenge yourself and that you really want to learn the topic.

DF: Other than finishing your MBA this summer – an incredible accomplishment – what’s next for you?

CL: I am actually working full-time with Alaska USA as a financial analyst! I will probably be in some sort of financial position in the near future. 

DF: How did Doyon Foundation scholarships help you?

CL: I was able to just take my classes and focus on school. Doyon Foundation scholarships freed up so much of my time and stress by allowing me to not have to work full time while in school.

Thank you so much for your academic support of Alaska Native students. It’s very much appreciated!

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. The 20th annual golf classic will take place Thursday, June 17, 2021, in Fairbanks. There are many opportunities to support the event as a sponsor, golfer or volunteer; to learn more and get involved, visit the Foundation website or contact golf@doyon.com.  

The Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center and Doyon Foundation have partnered to offer “Language Journeys,” a new series of online discussions on the Morris Thompson Center platform featuring Alaska Native language speakers from across the Interior sharing experiences with their traditional languages, what inspired them to learn them, and what they would like to see for the future of the languages. Episodes will air the last Friday of each month at 12 p.m. AKST on the Morris Thompson Center’s website.

The premiere episode of this series aired on April 30, 2021, and featured Denaakke’ and Holikachuk language speaker, Tristan Madros. Tristan grew up in both Kaltag and Nulato around many Elders who spoke their Native languages. This experience inspired him to learn Denaakke’ and Holikachuk. Allan Hayton, the Doyon Foundation language revitalization program director and moderator of the series, joined Tristan in discussing the significance of one’s connection to their Native language.

Please visit www.morristhompsoncenter.org/events/ to view this program and both upcoming and past cultural programs. You can also sign up for email updates about future events at the website.

These programs are proudly brought to you by the partnership between Doyon Foundation and the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center.


RSVP to join us Friday, May 21 on Zoom

Graduates, alumni, family, friends and other supporters are invited to join Doyon Foundation for our 2021 virtual graduate reception! The event will take place via Zoom on Friday, May 21 at 1 p.m. AKDT.

To participate, please complete and submit our RSVP form by Thursday, May 20 at 5 p.m. Then, watch your email for the Zoom link to participate in the reception.

The reception will feature graduate speaker Taniesha Moses and alumna speaker Andrea Nield. Taniesha, from Northway, graduated May 1 from the University of Alaska Fairbanks with a bachelor’s degree in social work. Andrea, from Nultao, is a graduate of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where she received a bachelor’s of business administration, management and organizations.

If you are graduating this year, there is still time to complete our graduate information request form. We’ll feature the information you share in our 2021 electronic graduate yearbook and in our 2021 graduate video! Check out the 2020 graduate yearbook and 2020 graduate video.

While we’ll miss coming together in person again this year, we are pleased that the virtual format will allow students and supporters from across the state and country to participate.

We hope you can join us to celebrate the Class of 2021! Please complete our RSVP form today, and watch your email for the Zoom link to participate in the reception.

Doyon Foundation is hiring a new Executive Director to lead our organization. The application deadline has been extended to Friday, March 5, 2021. We are proud of our commitment to provide educational, career, and cultural opportunities to enhance the identity and quality of life for Doyon shareholders. We seek to broaden our reach and services to Doyon Foundation’s shareholders and communities, which span 34 villages across Interior Alaska and includes over 20,000 shareholders from both rural and urban areas. In line with the Foundation’s and Doyon Limited’s mission, we are excited to find the right person to grow and shape our organization into its next chapter.

The successful candidate will promote Doyon Foundation’s values and effectively communicate its vision while building capacity to achieve and support it. The ideal candidate will be visible and accessible as they drive opportunities to provide scholarships to Doyon shareholders, establish new and cultivate existing partnerships with organizations across Alaska, and support career and educational/workforce development for shareholders in a variety of creative ways.

While the incoming Executive Director is expected to bring strong leadership, staff development, financial management, and communication skills to the role, “growing our own” is a cornerstone of Doyon Foundation’s mission. As such, we are excited to consider a variety of candidates, including those new to Foundation administration.

This position is based in Fairbanks, Alaska.

About Doyon Foundation

Doyon Foundation was founded by Doyon, Limited, the Alaska Native regional corporation for Interior Alaska, in 1989.

Our mission: To provide educational, career, and cultural opportunities to enhance the identity and quality of life for Doyon shareholders.

Our vision:

  • Financial Sustainability
  • Effective and Collaborative Strategic Partnerships
  • Organizational Excellence
  • Every Shareholders’ Dream is Realized
  • Strong Demonstration of Indigenous Language, Culture and Values

The Executive Director with Doyon Foundation brings the following:

  • Knowledge of Alaska Native cultures and languages within the Doyon region.
  • Strong written and oral communication skills, particularly the ability to communicate as a leader.
  • Strong financial management skills, including budget preparation, portfolio manager performance review, fund development, decision making and reporting, as well as grants and contract management.
  • Ability to work with organizations and communities in and outside the region to help perpetuate Doyon region languages and culture.
  • Ability to lead, manage, and cultivate relationships with a diverse group of people.
  • Solid organizational leadership abilities, including strategic planning, change management, staff management, networking, and program development.
  • Ability to fundraise through a variety of methods.

The Executive Director reports to the Board of Directors. Position responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

  • Executive Leadership in engaging and participating in the strategic planning process, business development efforts, general business review and problem solving, and policy development
  • Corporate Administration to plan, develop, organize, direct, and evaluate all aspects of day-to-day office administration to ensure professional and efficient corporate operations and performance
  • Financial Management in providing leadership throughout areas of responsibility on matters regarding budgetary performance, financial manager and portfolio oversight and cost control
  • Supervision, providing direction, vision, and oversight to all departments and supervising multiple positions.

See the job description at http://bit.ly/2NK4kG8 for the full listing of responsibilities.

Minimum qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree.
  • Two years of senior management level (CEO, CFO, COO, VP) experience in a for-profit or nonprofit organization, or three years of mid-management experience in a supervisory role.
  • Three years of experience directly managing a budget.
  • Proficient with Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook).

Preference statement: Doyon Foundation grants preference to qualified Doyon shareholders first, and second to qualified shareholders of other Alaska Native corporations that grant a similar preference in all phases of employment and training, which include, but are not limited to hiring, promotion, layoff, transfer, and training.

View the full job announcement and job description, and apply online at http://bit.ly/2NK4kG8.  

Watch our 2020 Fall Scholarship Award Recognition video!

At Doyon Foundation, we look forward to our scholarship award ceremony every year, but this year we had to do things a little differently to keep everyone safe. However, we still believe it is important to celebrate our hard-working scholarship recipients and celebrate our generous donors.

We invite you to take a few minutes to watch our fall 2020 scholarship award recognition video, featuring welcomes from Doyon, Limited President and CEO Aaron Schutt and our Board President Jennifer Fate, photos and quotes from our students, a listing of our amazing donors, and a heartfelt prayer for our students going forward in pursuit of their dreams.

Then, help us spread the word by liking, sharing and tagging students you know. Congratulations to all of our students, and thank you to all of our supporters!

Watch our video

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Doyon is supporting my endeavor toward a career in the electrical field”

We’d like to introduce you to one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Spencer Brown. Even though we are unable to hold the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic scholarship fundraiser this year, we still want to highlight our 2019 – 2020 Morris Thompson students and honor their hard work and achievements.

A Doyon Foundation student pursuing his certificate in industrial electricity, Spencer is scheduled to graduate from the Alaska Vocational Technical School (AVTEC) in June 2020. His parents are Nadene and Chad Brown; Nadene is from the McGrath area and Chad is from Anchorage. His maternal grandparents are Alice Verdene and Richard Anslement; both are from the McGrath area. His paternal grandparents are Gloria and Howdice Brown; Gloria is from Elim and Howdice is from Benson, Minnesota.

Spencer, a 2019 – 2020 Morris Thompson committee’s choice scholarship recipient, is a 2019 high school graduate from Enlightium Academy. He currently lives in Seward, where AVTEC is located.  

Spencer understands the power of setting goals. “My plans for the next several months are to stay focused on school, work hard and finish at the top of my class,” he says. Beyond that, he’s eager to enter the workforce and keep learning.

“Doyon Foundation graciously offered to help support my endeavor,” Spencer says. His scholarship helped cover costs of tuition as well as tools needed for AVTEC classes. “Doyon helped me overcome this challenge.”

A tour of AVTEC introduced him to the range of topics covered in the industrial electricity certificate. Day-to-day homework involves Spencer in practical applications of mathematical principles and theory.

“I love that I’m able to figure out such things as superposition, sine waves and Thevenin and Norton equivalents,” he says. “Everything I learn has a reason and a purpose. It’s an incredibly interesting and diverse field.”

Graduates in industrial electricity are in demand as construction and maintenance electricians, controls technicians, and marine engineers, among other careers. AVTEC’s program attracts detail-oriented students who enjoy solving complex technical projects – a passion Spencer discovered when he was 14 and helped his father with a building project.

Spencer continues to value teamwork. “I’d say the most fun part of industrial electricity is the cooperation among my peers to complete various labs and projects,” he says. Among the most challenging tasks was memorizing complex diagrams and functions in a mathematical logic class.

Students in Spencer’s field demonstrate proficiency in circuit analysis, including an ability to design, build, test and troubleshoot circuits and devices. Industrial electricity classes involve physics; industrial safety and health; renewable power; and an understanding of the National Electrical Code for construction and maintenance projects.

Founded in 1969, AVTEC is the only career and technical education center for post-secondary students statewide. “I would absolutely recommend AVTEC to anyone interested in the trades,” Spencer says.

While his time away from studies is limited as graduation day approaches, Spencer says that taking a break helps. “I’m putting all my efforts into studying,” he says, “but I do allow myself downtime.” He enjoys reading, hiking, fishing and composing music.

“Whenever the going gets tough, ask for help, whether it’s from family, peers or Him up above,” Spencer says. He encourages other students to get enough rest, eat healthy foods, and avoid drugs and alcohol.

“Respect your body,” he says. “The effort you put into your studies will determine how successful you are at them. You are accountable for your actions.”

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. And while the event itself is not happening this year, we still welcome your support! You may make a secure online donation on our website or mail a check to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. To direct your donation to the Morris Thompson scholarship fund, simply note “Morris Thompson scholarship fund” in the notes section of the online form or on the memo line of your check. Thank you for supporting our students!

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Doyon Foundation scholarships help me share diversity within health care-related discussions”

We’d like to introduce you to one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Hannah Bagot. Even though we are unable to hold the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic scholarship fundraiser this year, we still want to highlight our 2019 – 2020 Morris Thompson students and honor their hard work and achievements.

A graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Hannah Bagot is the daughter of Michael and Helen Bagot. Hannah is completing a master’s degree in health care administration and graduating in May 2021. Her hometown is Pleasanton, California. 

Hannah Bagot recalls searching out college programs to find one that matched her goals. It’s a path familiar to lots of students on their way to a rewarding career.

“I explored other majors in health care but they never seemed to be the right fit,” Hannah said, adding that obstacles like these can feel like failure.

“But through volunteering, working and internships, I eventually came to find the right profession for me,” she said. Hannah has volunteered at hospitals in North Carolina and in Utah, where she worked with a physical fitness program for children with special needs.

“My biggest piece of advice for other students is to take opportunities and try new things even if they’re not in your scope of interest or field of study. Everything can be a learning experience,” she said.

“You never know where you will pick up new skills, meet new people, or discover new passions. Try not to compare yourself with others.”

Scholarships from Doyon Foundation have helped Hannah attend schools to gain professional and academic skills for success in health care. “Doyon Foundation has made it possible for me to pursue a graduate degree in a field I’m passionate about,” she said. “Doyon Foundation scholarships have given me the opportunity to share diversity within health care-related discussions.”

Hannah’s plans include a summer internship in the strategy department of Atrium Health, a Charlotte, North Carolina-based nonprofit with hospitals and medical clinics in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. Her long-term goals after graduation involve seeking an administrative fellowship and work in a health care organization.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. While the event itself is not happening this year, we still welcome your support! You may make a secure online donation on our website or mail a check to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. To direct your donation to the Morris Thompson scholarship fund, simply note “Morris Thompson scholarship fund” in the notes section of the online form or on the memo line of your check. Thank you for supporting our students!

 

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I’m forever grateful for help I’m receiving from Doyon Foundation. Baasee!”

We’d like to introduce you to one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Angeli Kristovich. Even though we are unable to hold the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic scholarship fundraiser this year, we still want to highlight our 2019 – 2020 Morris Thompson students and honor their hard work and achievements.

Angeli Kristovich is the daughter of Carol Endresen of Fairbanks and the late Richard Kristovich of Ketchikan. Her paternal grandparents are Patrick and Jeannie Kristovich of Washington; her maternal grandparents are Angeline Evans of Koyukuk and Carl Noble of Fairbanks.

Angeli attends the University of Alaska Anchorage-Mat-Su campus where she’s pursuing a bachelor’s degree in business administration with a concentration in property management and real estate. She anticipates graduating in 2023. Angeli is from a family of Ketchikan fishermen.

Doyon Foundation: Congratulations on being awarded a Morris Thompson competitive scholarship. How did life prepare you for this moment?

Angeli Kristovich: I dropped out of high school at 15 and earned my GED. It was scary to find myself in back in class as a non-traditional student who had been out of high school for 15 years. It was hard getting back into school at first, but I learned there are many outlets and resources to help.

Studying hard is key and being involved on campus is important too. As I made more friends and used the tutoring center, the campus felt more like a home away from home rather than a scary place full of people who are smarter than me.

DF: That will sound familiar to lots of students who find their first semester at college pretty intimidating.

AK: My first semester was scary! I would go to the library and try to study but, needless to say, it was super overwhelming. So I’d check Facebook and other social media and end up spending time on my phone when I should’ve been studying.

I was able — luckily — to realize this trap. I ended up deleting all of my social media profiles. Since then I have felt freer! My decision might sound extreme, but for me it felt great. I have more time to study and I’m focusing on what I need to be focusing on.

DF: You’re involved in campus life to help concentrate on schoolwork and navigate college life in general?

AK: Yes. Volunteering and school work keep me very busy. I’m student government president at the Mat-Su campus and I’m vice president of the Alaska Native Cultures Club. I write for the Mat-Su Monitor, the student-run newspaper that’s distributed throughout the Mat-Su Valley.

When I’m not volunteering or involved with school stuff, I spend time with my husband and family. I stay very busy and out of trouble.

DF: Scholarship recipients like you nearly always mention specific things that would have been hurdles without Doyon Foundation help. Anything come to mind?

AK: I want to say thank you to all the donors who make Doyon Foundation scholarships possible. Without your help, my life as a full-time student would have been much harder. The Morris Thompson scholarship helped me with money to buy books and pay for gas to get back and forth to school.

I know my Grandma Angeline Evans is looking down on me and so proud that I’m finally putting all the wisdom she taught me into practice. Getting an education will open a lot of doors in my life. I’m forever grateful for all the help that I’m receiving from Doyon Foundation. Baasee!

DF: What’s on the horizon for you?

AK: I’m a wife and full-time student. After graduation, I want to be a real estate agent to help low-income families get into their dream home.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. While the event itself is not happening this year, we still welcome your support! You may make a secure online donation on our website or mail a check to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. To direct your donation to the Morris Thompson scholarship fund, simply note “Morris Thompson scholarship fund” in the notes section of the online form or on the memo line of your check. Thank you for supporting our students!

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