Doyon Foundation News


Candidates sought for scholarship review committee

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Help us connect students with scholarships – apply to serve on our competitive scholarship review committee!

Would you like to help connect students with scholarships? We have the perfect opportunity! We currently have three open seats on the Doyon Foundation competitive scholarship review committee. Interested candidates are encouraged to apply by Friday, April 28.

To qualify for this position, candidates must:

  • Be a Doyon shareholder.
  • Be age 18 or older.
  • Value and support higher education.
  • Be committed to serve a three-year term.
  • Have an internet-accessible computer with recent version of web browser installed (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera).
  • Attend an orientation in May/June in Fairbanks, either in person or via teleconference.
  • Spend 30 – 40 hours reviewing, evaluating and scoring all competitive scholarship applications online via the Doyon Foundation website.
  • Attend a one-day meeting in Fairbanks in June/July to award the scholarships.
  • Meet with Doyon Foundation administration to review and recommend competitive scholarship policy changes.

Candidates residing in rural areas are preferred, but applications from urban candidates are also welcomed. Please note that per IRS regulations, committee members cannot be employees of the Doyon Family of Companies or Doyon Foundation.

Service on the scholarship review committee is on a voluntary basis. Individuals interested in giving back and helping students achieve their full potential are encouraged to consider serving on this important committee.

Interested candidates should submit a résumé and a letter of interest outlining why they’d like to serve to Doris Miller, Foundation executive director, at millerd@doyon.com by Friday, April 28. The Doyon Foundation board of directors will select the new committee member at their next regularly scheduled meeting in Fairbanks.

For more information, please contact Doyon Foundation at 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

df-pcg-meme-for-facebookFebruary 15 marked the midway point for this year’s Pick. Click. Give. campaign – and yet Doyon Foundation was nowhere near the halfway point of our Pick. Click. Give. fundraising goal.

As of February 15, 28 donors had pledged $1,625 to Doyon Foundation, leaving a $3,375 gap between pledges and our $5,000 fundraising goal.

We are asking all Alaskans to consider helping us get to our $5,000 Pick. Click. Give. goal.

“Your Pick. Click. Give. donations go directly to support the Foundation’s general scholarship fund, which helps offset the high cost of tuition and books for both full-time and part-time college students,” says Doris Miller, executive director of Doyon Foundation.

Pick. Click. Give. donations are down significantly from last year, negatively impacting nonprofits statewide. Less than 5 percent of Alaskans are choosing to Pick. Click. Give. when they complete their PFD applications.

Last year, 70 donors contributed $5,375 to Doyon Foundation through Pick. Click. Give. This year, we just hope to reach the $5,000 mark.

“We know it is a tough year for a lot of Alaskans,” Doris acknowledges. “At the same time, we need to continue supporting the efforts of students who are going to school with the goal of getting an education and improving the quality of life for themselves, their families and their communities. Because in the end, that benefits us all.”

Alaskans are encouraged to Pick. Click. Give. to Doyon Foundation when completing their 2017 PFD application. The deadline to submit a 2017 PFD application is Friday, March 31.

Those who have already submitted a PFD application can easily add a Pick. Click. Give. contribution by logging back into their application at pfd.alaska.gov. Step-by-step instructions for making a Pick. Click. Give. donation are available here.

Donations of any amount are welcomed. “Every little bit moves us toward our goal,” Doris says.

 

Thank you to everyone who joined us for the Doyon Foundation 2017 spring student dinner! Nearly 50 guests, including students, alumni and donors, enjoyed the event, which took place February 10 in Fairbanks. View more event photos on Facebook.

We were especially honored to welcome our special guests, including Al Sr. and Betty Ketzler; Foundation board president Lanien Livingston, vice president Paul Mountain, new member LaVerne Demientieff; and Doyon, Limited chair Walter “Wally” Carlo.

The menu included fish strips, half dried and baked salmon, moose soup, a salmon casserole, cupcakes and blueberry dessert, contributed by Paul Mountain, Doris Miller, Maurine McGinty, Susan Paskvan, Lessa Peter and LaVerne Demientieff.

In addition to the meal, we had a Valentine’s Day card-making table, and Susan Paskvan led a paper/rock/scissors game in Denaakk’e!

As if the delicious food and fun activities weren’t enough, many guests went home as winners of some fabulous door prizes, including:

  • Woman’s fleece sweater
  • Coffee mug and $25 Starbucks gift card
  • Star Wars movie basket
  • Valentine’s baking basket
  • Fleece blanket
  • Round-trip ticket on Ravn Alaska
  • Beaded key chain and cardholder, donated by alumnus Allan Hayton
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks Department of Social Work gift bags filled with coffee mugs, candy, notepads and more, donated by board member LaVerne Demientieff
  • $25 Fred Meyer gift card, donated by alumna Sheryl Meierotto

We were thrilled with the wonderful turnout at our spring student dinner, and can’t wait for the fall event! Keep an eye on our website, blog and Facebook page, or subscribe to our email list, for details on future events – we hope to see you there!

Continuing a lifetime of language work

Ruth Ridley and John Ritter

Ruth recording lessons with John Ritter at the Yukon Native Language Centre

As Doyon Foundation continues to grow our language revitalization efforts in the Doyon region, we are noticing a group of people who are committed and dedicating their own time to learning and perpetuating their ancestral language. We are pleased to share some of these “Language Champion” profiles with you. If you know a language champion, please nominate him or her by contacting our language program director at haytona@doyon.com. Language champions may also complete our profile questionnaire here. You may learn more about our language revitalization program on our website.

Ruth Ridley is a fluent speaker of the Eagle, Alaska, dialect of the Hän Athabascan language. She has been a language champion for many years, following in the footsteps of her late mother Louise Paul. Ruth’s lifetime work of transcribing and translating Hän language began when she was a child. “I started off doing transcriptions for Hän language that mom recorded with John Ritter (of the Yukon Native Language Centre),” she explains.

Ruth Ridley

Ruth at home with sewing projects

Ruth was brought up by her parents Louise and Susie Paul in a mining camp just downriver from Eagle. “We grew up in Coal Creek mining camp. Our families lived there, summer and winter,” Ruth shares. “My mom’s parents were Eliza and Joe Malcolm in Eagle, and my dad’s parents were Elizabeth and Paul Josie in Old Crow.” Ruth has many good memories of growing up in the Eagle area. “There are creeks with grayling, and beaver ponds, and lots of porcupine, and lots of moose, caribou, and a lot of grizzly bear,” she says.

Ruth sometimes spent all summer with her grandparents. “We would go to fish camp with my grandma and grandpa and they spoke Loucheux or Gwich’in. My grandma didn’t speak English, so we had to speak to her in Hän, and then she would talk back to us in Gwich’in. So that’s how we learned too,” Ruth recalls.

Over the years, Ruth has maintained language connections with her Hän and Gwich’in-speaking relatives in Canada, attending workshops in both Dawson City and at the Yukon Native Language Centre (YNLC) at Yukon College, Whitehorse. “My dad’s sister was Edith Josie, who did lot of language work in Old Crow,” Ruth says.

Ruth has been involved in Hän language work since the late 1970s when she collaborated with professor Michael Krauss at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) to develop the first practical writing system for the language. She composed a collection of stories in Hän based on traditional village life, Eagle Hän Huchʼinn Hòdök, published in bilingual format by the Alaska Native Language Center in 1983. Also in that year, she served as Alaska chair of an important Athabaskan language conference held at UAF, a gathering that attracted participants from throughout Canada and the United States. She also served as principal speaker in a three-week Hän practicum offered as a part of CoLang 2016 at UAF.

Recently (2015-2016) Ruth has been a Hän language consultant for Doyon Foundation, working with YNLC linguist John Ritter to record and transcribe a set of basic Hän language lessons. These lessons will be shared first as a booklet with accompanying audio, and later posted on the internet as part of the Doyon Languages Online project, a partnership of Doyon Foundation and 7,000 Languages.

On the importance of creating language lessons such as these, Ruth shared, “I think it would be easier to speak in sentences than just one word at a time. And that way kids can look at the words and they could pronounce it, like my grandchildren they say they’re hungry and they’re thirsty in Hän.”

Ruth feels language is important because “you could really find out about your culture and the kind of person you are, if you could understand and speak your language. I think it’s important that people learn where they come from and where they are going.”

Ruth is looking forward to sharing these lessons with learners. “I guess the biggest challenge is to get started and get going in the right direction,” she remarks. “If they could get started with these lessons then they’ll know which way they’re supposed to go.”

Ruth is also curious about the next steps of posting the lessons online through the Doyon Languages Online project. “I’m just waiting for them to get on the internet to see how people like the language, or how useful they would be for teaching themselves on the computer,” she says.

According to the Alaska Native Language Center, “Hän is the Athabascan language spoken in Alaska at the village of Eagle and in Yukon Territory at Dawson. A writing system was established in the 1970s, and considerable documentation has been carried out at the Alaska Native Language Center as well as at the Yukon Native Language Centre in Whitehorse.”

For more information about how to get copies of Ruth’s Hän language lessons, or to learn more about the Doyon Languages Online project, please contact Allan Hayton at 907.459.2162 or haytona@doyon.com.

Did you Pick. Click. Give. when you filled out your PFD application this year? If so, post this badge to your Facebook page or add it to your email to let everyone know you are supporting students and saving languages with Doyon Foundation!

If you haven’t yet made a Pick. Click. Give. pledge, please consider doing so today. Less than 5 percent of Alaskans are giving this year, and nonprofits across the state are feeling the decline (including Doyon Foundation). We need your help to reach our Pick. Click. Give. goal!

Already filed for your PFD? Don’t worry – it is easy to log back into your PFD application and add a Pick. Click. Give. donation. Need help? Check out these simple step-by-step instructions.

From all of us here at Doyon Foundation, thank you for your support!

New Requirement Takes Effect with Summer 2017 Scholarships

Doyon Foundation recently reduced its part-time credit requirement from six credits to three credits. The new requirement will allow even more students to qualify for a basic scholarship.

The new requirement takes effect with the summer 2017 scholarships. Wednesday, March 15 is the deadline to apply for a basic scholarship for the summer semester. Students planning to attend school this summer are encouraged to apply for an $800 scholarship for part-time students or $1,200 scholarship for full-time students.

To be eligible for a Foundation scholarship, applicants must:

To apply, students must complete the online application, provide proof of academic enrollment, and submit transcripts. The application and details on the application process are available on the Foundation website.

Students needing computer access are welcome to come to the Foundation office at the Doyon Industrial Facility, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101 in Fairbanks. Foundation staff is happy to answer any questions or provide any help students may need during the application process.

Students are encouraged to apply early, as basic scholarships are now awarded on a first-come, first-served basis.

For more information, visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact Maurine McGinty, scholarship program manager, at mcgintym@doyon.com or 907.459.2049.

Doyon Foundation made 327 students very happy last week when we awarded $401,895 in scholarships for the spring 2017 semester!award-reception-2015-086-2

The scholarships included 177 basic full-time scholarships of $1,200 each, 81 basic part-time scholarships of $800 each, and 69 competitive scholarships ranging from $5,000 to $9,000 each.

The next scholarship application deadline is coming up on Wednesday, March 15. Students planning to attend school during the summer 2017 semester are encouraged to apply for a basic scholarship. Basic scholarships range from $800 for part-time students to $1,200 for full-time students.

Learn more and apply for a scholarship on our website. Or for more information, contact Maurine McGinty, scholarship program manager, at mcgintym@doyon.com or 907.459.2049.

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