Doyon Foundation Scholarships


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Doyon is supporting my endeavor toward a career in the electrical field”

We’d like to introduce you to one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Spencer Brown. Even though we are unable to hold the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic scholarship fundraiser this year, we still want to highlight our 2019 – 2020 Morris Thompson students and honor their hard work and achievements.

A Doyon Foundation student pursuing his certificate in industrial electricity, Spencer is scheduled to graduate from the Alaska Vocational Technical School (AVTEC) in June 2020. His parents are Nadene and Chad Brown; Nadene is from the McGrath area and Chad is from Anchorage. His maternal grandparents are Alice Verdene and Richard Anslement; both are from the McGrath area. His paternal grandparents are Gloria and Howdice Brown; Gloria is from Elim and Howdice is from Benson, Minnesota.

Spencer, a 2019 – 2020 Morris Thompson committee’s choice scholarship recipient, is a 2019 high school graduate from Enlightium Academy. He currently lives in Seward, where AVTEC is located.  

Spencer understands the power of setting goals. “My plans for the next several months are to stay focused on school, work hard and finish at the top of my class,” he says. Beyond that, he’s eager to enter the workforce and keep learning.

“Doyon Foundation graciously offered to help support my endeavor,” Spencer says. His scholarship helped cover costs of tuition as well as tools needed for AVTEC classes. “Doyon helped me overcome this challenge.”

A tour of AVTEC introduced him to the range of topics covered in the industrial electricity certificate. Day-to-day homework involves Spencer in practical applications of mathematical principles and theory.

“I love that I’m able to figure out such things as superposition, sine waves and Thevenin and Norton equivalents,” he says. “Everything I learn has a reason and a purpose. It’s an incredibly interesting and diverse field.”

Graduates in industrial electricity are in demand as construction and maintenance electricians, controls technicians, and marine engineers, among other careers. AVTEC’s program attracts detail-oriented students who enjoy solving complex technical projects – a passion Spencer discovered when he was 14 and helped his father with a building project.

Spencer continues to value teamwork. “I’d say the most fun part of industrial electricity is the cooperation among my peers to complete various labs and projects,” he says. Among the most challenging tasks was memorizing complex diagrams and functions in a mathematical logic class.

Students in Spencer’s field demonstrate proficiency in circuit analysis, including an ability to design, build, test and troubleshoot circuits and devices. Industrial electricity classes involve physics; industrial safety and health; renewable power; and an understanding of the National Electrical Code for construction and maintenance projects.

Founded in 1969, AVTEC is the only career and technical education center for post-secondary students statewide. “I would absolutely recommend AVTEC to anyone interested in the trades,” Spencer says.

While his time away from studies is limited as graduation day approaches, Spencer says that taking a break helps. “I’m putting all my efforts into studying,” he says, “but I do allow myself downtime.” He enjoys reading, hiking, fishing and composing music.

“Whenever the going gets tough, ask for help, whether it’s from family, peers or Him up above,” Spencer says. He encourages other students to get enough rest, eat healthy foods, and avoid drugs and alcohol.

“Respect your body,” he says. “The effort you put into your studies will determine how successful you are at them. You are accountable for your actions.”

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. And while the event itself is not happening this year, we still welcome your support! You may make a secure online donation on our website or mail a check to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. To direct your donation to the Morris Thompson scholarship fund, simply note “Morris Thompson scholarship fund” in the notes section of the online form or on the memo line of your check. Thank you for supporting our students!

159_MT_Rebekah_FB-IN‘I want to work on stories that are inclusive and meaningful’

We’d like to introduce you to one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Rebekah Hartman. Even though we are unable to hold the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic scholarship fundraiser this year, we still want to highlight our 2019 – 2020 Morris Thompson students and honor their hard work and achievements.

A University of Alaska student graduating in 2021, Rebekah Hartman is the daughter of Michael and Angela Hartman. Her maternal grandparents are Alice and Rudy Demientieff of Holy Cross. Rebekah’s hometown is Wasilla. 

When Rebekah Hartman discovered the award-winning animated children’s program “Steven Universe,” a world opened up to her.

“Those are the types of shows I want to work on,” she said. The Cartoon Network adventure series tells the story of friends protecting their own kind in a fictionalized world. “Growing up, I did not really know anything about LGTTQ+ people — I thought they were strange. It was shows like ‘Steven Universe’ that made me realize I was wrong.”

Rebekah has earned Doyon Foundation scholarships throughout her college years as she pursues a bachelor’s degree in printmaking from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF).

“What attracts me to animation is that, first of all, it’s beautiful and second is the impact that animated stories can have,” she said. “I want to work on stories that are meaningful and inclusive.”

An active volunteer focused on projects to benefit Alaska Native people, Rebekah served as student club secretary of the Alaska Native Social Workers Association in the 2019 – 2020 school year. The UAF group’s purpose includes service to others and promoting awareness of Alaska Native cultures in the state. At the winter holidays, Rebekah helped make greeting cards for the Fairbanks Native Association Elder Program. She has volunteered with First Alaskans Institute, an Anchorage-based public policy and research group, and with the Elders and Youth Conference sponsored by Alaska Federation of Natives.

She hopes other students will be attentive to mental health, especially if interest in school or self confidence starts to slip. “What I’ve found helpful to address these emotions is going to counseling,” she said. “It helps clear my mind and to understand myself better.”

Rebekah plans to return to UAF in the fall to complete her bachelor’s degree and then attend art school to earn a master’s degree in animation.

“I want to work on a show that includes Indigenous people,” she said. “We are constantly forgotten in television and when we are included, there are usually stereotypes.”

Among her favorite animated series is “Molly of Denali,” a first-of-its kind children’s show whose main character is an Alaska Native person. “My goal,” Rebekah said, “is to create meaningful stories for people to watch.”

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. While the event itself is not happening this year, we still welcome your support! You may make a secure online donation on our website or mail a check to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. To direct your donation to the Morris Thompson scholarship fund, simply note “Morris Thompson scholarship fund” in the notes section of the online form or on the memo line of your check. Thank you for supporting our students!

159_MT_Noah_FB-INYou have to know who you’re not to know who you are”

We’d like to introduce you to another one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Noah Lovell. Even though we are unable to hold the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic scholarship fundraiser this year, we still want to highlight our 2019 – 2020 Morris Thompson students and honor their hard work and achievements.

A University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) student graduating in May 2020, Noah Lovell is the son of Patrick and Sallie Lovell of Fairbanks, Alaska. Noah’s maternal grandparents are Lilian Evans of Rampart and Joseph Watson Burns of Fairbanks; his maternal great-grandparents are Thomas G. Evans of Rampart and Sally Woods Evans Hudson of Rampart. Paternal grandparents are Yoshiko Yamamoto of Kyoto, Japan, and John Lovell of Chelan, Washington. 

Noah earned Morris Thompson competitive scholarships throughout his college years; he is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in business administration with an emphasis in marketing. Noah’s hometown is Fairbanks, Alaska.

Doyon Foundation: Congratulations on becoming a member of the UAF Class of 2020. Spring semester in Alaska and around the world was upended because of the coronavirus pandemic. How did life change for you?

Noah Lovell: The pandemic and everything going on with it has been the biggest challenge I’ve faced during my education. For a social person like me, distancing because of the virus was difficult. I don’t know where I’d be without my family, friends and faith. I went from having most of my classes held in person to all of them being online.

But it’s also been an amazing reset: UAF is using technology so that students can continue to see their professors and classmates weekly. This challenging time shook the university and all of Alaska, but it has also revealed our resilience.

DF: Like a lot of us, you’ve used this upheaval to take stock of life.

NL: I’ve found a lot of wisdom in these words: “You have to know who you are not to know who you are.” What this means to me is to know what you like but focus more on what you love. I like to paint, and I love to write and play the violin. I’m also very happy and joyful and love to encourage others. I have figured out that I am not a mean person, but extremely easy-going with a lot of dedication to the things I love. I have found my identity and that makes everything else worthwhile.

Don’t let anyone box you in and don’t put anyone else in a box. Take a step back and evaluate the current situation of your life. Ask yourself what could be changed for the better and write it down. Give yourself time to be a student as well as to have fun with family and friends. It’s a balance, for sure.

DF: Does an example come to mind? Maybe a time when you’ve achieved that balance between school and time with friends?

NL: I’m a full-time student but I still manage to get involved in my community. One of the rewards is that you never know who you’ll meet.

For instance, it was a friend’s birthday back in the fall and he wanted to celebrate by having a group of us spend time at a local soup kitchen. I thought we were going to get dirty and work in the kitchen, but they had enough volunteers and so we were invited to sit and talk with people who were eating that day.

I met this awesome guy who truly knew the art of storytelling. A while later, when my mother, grandma and I visited the Fairbanks Correctional Center as part of a prison ministry, there was the man I met at the soup kitchen, visiting an inmate just like in the story he told me. We joked with each other and then he went his way and I went mine. You truly never know who you’re going to impact, and that kind of surprise keeps life interesting.

DF: Is taking time to evaluate life helping shape your plans after graduation?

NL:  My current long-term goal is to earn a master’s degree from the College of Theology and Ministry at Oral Roberts University and work in ministry. I would love to continue on to get a Doctorate in Theology, but it’s always one step at a time. This past year I’ve grown in my faith and because of this I’ve decided I’d like to further my education in something I’m truly passionate about.

DF: What’s it like spending summers among Alaska visitors? You’re an Alaska Native tour guide on the Riverboat Discovery, based in Fairbanks. The tour typically includes a visit to the Chena Indian village.

NL: The Riverboat Discovery is a wonderful opportunity that provided a strong foundation for me.

It’s an amazing job that allowed me to share the Alaska Native culture, specifically the Athabascan culture, with guests of Alaska. As a guide, I performed demonstrations in front of 300 to 800 people and learned valuable skills to carry into my future. The Riverboat has strong leadership and invested in developing its employees. As a guide I was provided customer service, leadership and mentoring training. I’m very thankful for the work experience and I believe it has helped me to develop skills to take into my future.

DF: How has earning a Morris Thompson competitive scholarship benefited you? Has it helped in ways that you didn’t anticipate?

NL: The Doyon Foundation has truly lifted me as a student. Receiving the Morris Thompson competitive scholarship was an honor and true blessing.

Being awarded scholarships from Doyon Foundation provided me with the resources to succeed in my degree and the confidence to excel in school. I was able to pay tuition, buy textbooks and other course-related expenses, and focus on my course load.

I’d like to take this opportunity to thank God, my family and my friends who have continued to encourage and support me through my undergraduate education. A big thank you to Doyon Foundation and everyone who has helped me these past four years; here’s to the class of 2020!

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. While the event itself is not happening this year, we still welcome your support! You may make a secure online donation on our website or mail a check to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. To direct your donation to the Morris Thompson scholarship fund, simply note “Morris Thompson scholarship fund” in the notes section of the online form or on the memo line of your check. Thank you for supporting our students!

 

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When work hours end, Im 100 percent a father” 

A medical student completing his residency in anesthesiology, John Williams graduated in May 2020 from Texas A&M College of Medicine. He is from Lake Jackson, Texas. 

With just days to go before graduating with his medical degree, John Williams considered what it takes to set a goal and meet it.

“My biggest tip for success is to make things happen for yourself,” he said.

“Whether you’re working on a big goal like furthering your education or a small goal like finishing an assignment, obstacles are always going to get in your way.”

His advice: Anticipate challenges without losing sight of success.

For instance, one response to setbacks may be to accept a finish that’s less than you’re capable of. Others may seek help — the right answer sometimes, John said, but not always.

“And some people are just going to continue to work and try different things until they find a way to finish perfectly. Be that person who does not give up,” he said.

John’s goals include becoming a pediatric anesthesiologist or a pediatric cardiac anesthesiologist. His medical residency is in anesthesiology in Temple, Texas.

“Doyon Foundation made a gigantic difference my education,” he said. While students in his specialty may graduate with six-figure loan debt, John will start his career with a fraction of that amount — a fact he attributes to Doyon Foundation’s generosity. “This has been extremely helpful to my family and me,” he said.

John serves at a free clinic for underprivileged people and enjoys rock climbing and golf. He built a rock wall in an upstairs room at his house and practices there with his sons, aged 2 and 1.

“It’s challenging to be a big part of my kids’ lives as well as being a good student,” John said. He’s learned to treat time spent studying as work. “During work hours, I’m extremely focused and knock out my priorities. When work hours end, I am 100 percent a father and I forget about school.”

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. While the event itself is not happening this year, we still welcome your support! You may make a secure online donation on our website or mail a check to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. To direct your donation to the Morris Thompson scholarship fund, simply note “Morris Thompson scholarship fund” in the notes section of the online form or on the memo line of your check. Thank you for supporting our students!

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“Your education is powerful and it’s yours. Just keep chugging along!”

A University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) student from Wasilla, Jasmine Gilpin earned her bachelor’s degree in business administration with an emphasis in accounting in May 2018. Her parents are Monica and Joe Gilpin of Wasilla. Jasmine’s maternal grandparents are Irma and Dave Arrants of Wasilla, and her paternal grandparents are Shirley and Ed Knox of Surprise, Arizona.

Jasmine: In January 2018, I started a semester-long internship in Anchorage at Alaska Permanent Capital Management (APCM) and was introduced to the financial planning industry. Financial planning and investment advising is the perfect career for me.

Doyon Foundation: Because it draws on your strengths.

Jasmine: Yes. It’s a career that involves helping people prepare for a financially secure future. The field is always changing and keeps you on your toes. It involves having to think strategically. I’ve found my passion.

Doyon Foundation: What’s on the horizon for you?

Jasmine: I’ve accepted a full-time position as an associate financial advisor at Alaska Permanent Capital Management. I plan to work there and complete my Series 65 license, which will qualify me as an investment advisor representative.

I’m excited to be finishing one milestone in my life – graduating from UAS – and beginning another. Doyon Foundation scholarships helped me pursue and finish my bachelor’s degree so that I’m graduating with minimal student loan debt.

Doyon Foundation: Your long-term plans include continuing your education in financial planning. What does that involve?

Jasmine: APCM offers amazing support and guidance to its employees. I’ll be working toward my Certified Financial Planner certification, which involves two years of on-the-job experience and an extensive exam.

Doyon Foundation: How did you manage obstacles on the way toward earning your degree?

Jasmine: For me, too much work and no play result in burnout and frustration. The biggest challenge in completing my degree was learning to balance work, a social life, and education.

I’ve learned over the years that I have to take time for myself to enjoy my hobbies, spend time with friends and family, and just living life to the fullest! Finding a balance can be difficult, but it’s necessary.

Doyon Foundation: It helps that you like to be outdoors.

Jasmine: In the winter I’m an extreme backcountry snowmobile rider and in summer I love to hike, camp, fish and hunt. I love the outdoors and try to spend as much time as possible enjoying all the activities that Alaska has to offer.

Doyon Foundation: You have real-world advice when it comes to college. What should other students know?

Jasmine: Obtaining a college degree can feel very difficult and overwhelming at times. Do not stop!

Taking even one class a semester is better than taking a complete break. Your education is something no one can ever take away from you. It’s powerful and it’s yours. Just keep chugging along!

Doyon Foundation: Any special thank-you’s?

Jasmine: My mom has been there through thick and thin, always cheering me on. Thank you, Mom!

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. While the event itself is not happening this year, we still welcome your support! You may make a secure online donation on our website or mail a check to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. To direct your donation to the Morris Thompson scholarship fund, simply note “Morris Thompson scholarship fund” in the notes section of the online form or on the memo line of your check. Thank you for supporting our students!

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Doyon Foundation scholarships help me share diversity within health care-related discussions”

We’d like to introduce you to one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Hannah Bagot. Even though we are unable to hold the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic scholarship fundraiser this year, we still want to highlight our 2019 – 2020 Morris Thompson students and honor their hard work and achievements.

A graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Hannah Bagot is the daughter of Michael and Helen Bagot. Hannah is completing a master’s degree in health care administration and graduating in May 2021. Her hometown is Pleasanton, California. 

Hannah Bagot recalls searching out college programs to find one that matched her goals. It’s a path familiar to lots of students on their way to a rewarding career.

“I explored other majors in health care but they never seemed to be the right fit,” Hannah said, adding that obstacles like these can feel like failure.

“But through volunteering, working and internships, I eventually came to find the right profession for me,” she said. Hannah has volunteered at hospitals in North Carolina and in Utah, where she worked with a physical fitness program for children with special needs.

“My biggest piece of advice for other students is to take opportunities and try new things even if they’re not in your scope of interest or field of study. Everything can be a learning experience,” she said.

“You never know where you will pick up new skills, meet new people, or discover new passions. Try not to compare yourself with others.”

Scholarships from Doyon Foundation have helped Hannah attend schools to gain professional and academic skills for success in health care. “Doyon Foundation has made it possible for me to pursue a graduate degree in a field I’m passionate about,” she said. “Doyon Foundation scholarships have given me the opportunity to share diversity within health care-related discussions.”

Hannah’s plans include a summer internship in the strategy department of Atrium Health, a Charlotte, North Carolina-based nonprofit with hospitals and medical clinics in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. Her long-term goals after graduation involve seeking an administrative fellowship and work in a health care organization.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. While the event itself is not happening this year, we still welcome your support! You may make a secure online donation on our website or mail a check to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. To direct your donation to the Morris Thompson scholarship fund, simply note “Morris Thompson scholarship fund” in the notes section of the online form or on the memo line of your check. Thank you for supporting our students!

 

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I’m forever grateful for help I’m receiving from Doyon Foundation. Baasee!”

We’d like to introduce you to one of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Angeli Kristovich. Even though we are unable to hold the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic scholarship fundraiser this year, we still want to highlight our 2019 – 2020 Morris Thompson students and honor their hard work and achievements.

Angeli Kristovich is the daughter of Carol Endresen of Fairbanks and the late Richard Kristovich of Ketchikan. Her paternal grandparents are Patrick and Jeannie Kristovich of Washington; her maternal grandparents are Angeline Evans of Koyukuk and Carl Noble of Fairbanks.

Angeli attends the University of Alaska Anchorage-Mat-Su campus where she’s pursuing a bachelor’s degree in business administration with a concentration in property management and real estate. She anticipates graduating in 2023. Angeli is from a family of Ketchikan fishermen.

Doyon Foundation: Congratulations on being awarded a Morris Thompson competitive scholarship. How did life prepare you for this moment?

Angeli Kristovich: I dropped out of high school at 15 and earned my GED. It was scary to find myself in back in class as a non-traditional student who had been out of high school for 15 years. It was hard getting back into school at first, but I learned there are many outlets and resources to help.

Studying hard is key and being involved on campus is important too. As I made more friends and used the tutoring center, the campus felt more like a home away from home rather than a scary place full of people who are smarter than me.

DF: That will sound familiar to lots of students who find their first semester at college pretty intimidating.

AK: My first semester was scary! I would go to the library and try to study but, needless to say, it was super overwhelming. So I’d check Facebook and other social media and end up spending time on my phone when I should’ve been studying.

I was able — luckily — to realize this trap. I ended up deleting all of my social media profiles. Since then I have felt freer! My decision might sound extreme, but for me it felt great. I have more time to study and I’m focusing on what I need to be focusing on.

DF: You’re involved in campus life to help concentrate on schoolwork and navigate college life in general?

AK: Yes. Volunteering and school work keep me very busy. I’m student government president at the Mat-Su campus and I’m vice president of the Alaska Native Cultures Club. I write for the Mat-Su Monitor, the student-run newspaper that’s distributed throughout the Mat-Su Valley.

When I’m not volunteering or involved with school stuff, I spend time with my husband and family. I stay very busy and out of trouble.

DF: Scholarship recipients like you nearly always mention specific things that would have been hurdles without Doyon Foundation help. Anything come to mind?

AK: I want to say thank you to all the donors who make Doyon Foundation scholarships possible. Without your help, my life as a full-time student would have been much harder. The Morris Thompson scholarship helped me with money to buy books and pay for gas to get back and forth to school.

I know my Grandma Angeline Evans is looking down on me and so proud that I’m finally putting all the wisdom she taught me into practice. Getting an education will open a lot of doors in my life. I’m forever grateful for all the help that I’m receiving from Doyon Foundation. Baasee!

DF: What’s on the horizon for you?

AK: I’m a wife and full-time student. After graduation, I want to be a real estate agent to help low-income families get into their dream home.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students forward their education. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. While the event itself is not happening this year, we still welcome your support! You may make a secure online donation on our website or mail a check to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. To direct your donation to the Morris Thompson scholarship fund, simply note “Morris Thompson scholarship fund” in the notes section of the online form or on the memo line of your check. Thank you for supporting our students!

156_Fall Scholarship Promotion Extended_FB-INExtra time to apply for competitive and basic scholarships for fall 2020

To give our students additional time during this challenging period, we have extended the Doyon Foundation fall scholarship deadline until Monday, June 1 at 11:59 p.m. This is the new deadline to apply for basic and competitive scholarships for the fall 2020 semester.

For the fall 2020 semester, we will be awarding:

  • Competitive scholarships ranging from $5,000 to $9,000 (see our website for details on the wide range of competitive awards!)
  • $1,200 basic scholarships for full-time students (undergraduates taking 12 or more credits, or 9 or more credits for graduate students)
  • $800 basic scholarships for part-time students (undergraduates taking 3 to 11 credits, or 2 to 8 credits for graduate students)

A reminder that competitive scholarships are awarded through a competitive review process, while basic scholarships are awarded to all students who meet the eligibility guidelines and submit a completed application by the appropriate deadline. Also, our basic scholarships are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Note that you don’t have to fill out separate applications for competitive and basic awards.

In order to be eligible to apply, you must:

  • Be enrolled to Doyon, Limited or be the child of an original enrollee
  • Be accepted to an accredited college, university, technical or vocational school
  • Meet our minimum GPA requirements
  • Be enrolled in the required minimum number of credits

Get all the details on scholarship eligibility and application requirements by reviewing our scholarship resource handbook.

To apply, visit our online scholarship application portal. If you are a first-time applicant, you will need to create a new account. If you need help, see our step-by-step account creation instructions or view our detailed application instructions.

Once you are logged in, select “apply” and the system will ask for an access code. If you do not already have an access code, please call 907.459.2048 or email us at foundation@doyon.com to obtain one.

It is very important to log in to your student account before the scholarship application deadline to check that you have submitted all the required materials. Note that official transcripts are required for the fall scholarship deadline.

If you have any questions or problems, please contact our scholarship program at foundation@doyon.com or 907.459.2048.

131_Student_Promotion_BUDDY_FB-IN“I want to inspire students to excel at education” 

Raised in Seward, Buddy North attends Teachers College at Columbia University in New York City where he’s at work on a doctorate in philosophy and education. His mother is Marti Wallis of Fort Yukon and his maternal grandparents are the late Mae and Pete Wallis of Fort Yukon.

Buddy holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) and a master’s degree from the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. He has been a Doyon Foundation scholarship recipient throughout his undergraduate and graduate years. Buddy anticipates graduating with his PhD in 2022.

Doyon Foundation: You’ve identified connections between your studies and Indigenous ways of teaching. What have you found?

Buddy North: The apex of formal education, PhD translates as doctor of philosophy. In this case, “doctor” means “expert” or “teacher,” while philosophy in ancient Greek means love of wisdom. Someone who earns a PhD becomes an expert in the love of wisdom, both a teacher and a leader.

This idea is reminiscent of the Indigenous way of education from time immemorial. Elders and leaders of Indigenous communities have always been experts and teachers, but unfortunately this has been given less emphasis in our times.

DF: These thoughts are shaping your long-term plans.

BN: Yes. I hope to teach instructors, philosophers, students and Native communities how to motivate a love of wisdom because it’s the foundation of all learning — Indigenous ways and the way of the schoolbook. With a philosopher’s eye toward the examined life, I abstain from drugs and alcohol.

I want to inspire students to excel at education to become Elders, experts, leaders and teachers. My professional goals hinge on giving back to our community and to others. By devoting my life to learning, sharing the love of wisdom, and working toward a healthier society, I hope to be a positive role model.

DF: How did Doyon Foundation help advance your education?

BN: Without Doyon Foundation I would have never made it through undergraduate school; I would not be where I am today. I would not have thought that education is valuable if Doyon Foundation did not also think so. With such support, I feel as if I’ve won the lottery because even if I had, I’d be doing exactly the same thing.

DF: A love of learning hasn’t always been true for you. What changed and why?

BN: I wasn’t inspired to learn through primary and secondary school. I was not curious about school. Then as a freshman at UAA, I began wondering, “How should I live my life?”

I learned that the discipline of philosophy asked this ancient question in a critical way; I realized I should learn more. For the first time in my life, I was drawn to academic education. I began nurturing my own education. I began playing an active role in learning about the world.

DF: You trace this early lack of interest to Alaska’s past.

BN: Since Russian colonialism, there has been a lived struggle between learning Indigenous ways and learning the way of the schoolbook. Schooling — which is distinct but related to education — was used in many ways as a tool against us.

I find it incredible that our ancestors flourished on Alaska’s wild lands for thousands of years. I take this fact as a token of pride. It illustrates difficulties overcome with a modest, sustainable and appreciative conscience.

DF: How are you enjoying life in a big city?

BN: When I’m not busy with school, I am hanging out with my wife and 2-year-old son, going to museums, parks and playgrounds around New York City. But we miss the wilderness.

DF: Does philosophy offer insight when it comes to succeeding in school? What would you like other students to know?

BN: There are character traits — virtues — needed to excel whether you’re in school, building and setting up a fish wheel in the Yukon River, or surviving and thriving in the wilderness.

Those traits are: resilience, perseverance, curiosity, wonder, creativity, imagination, intellectual humility, autonomy, collectivity, attentiveness, carefulness, thoroughness, open-mindedness, and intellectual and moral courage. Tenacity and appreciation for beauty are on the list as well.

DF: If you could sum up the list?

BN: Keep up the good and keep learning!

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RSVP today to join us May 22

The Doyon Foundation graduate reception is going virtual this year! While we will miss coming together in person in Fairbanks, we are excited for the opportunity to include students and supporters from across the country in a way we’ve never done before.

Whether you are a graduate, student, alumni, family, friend, teacher or other supporter, please mark your calendar and plan to join us:

Doyon Foundation 2020 Graduate Reception

Friday, May 22

2 p.m. AKST

Via ZOOM

RSVP to milkp@doyon.com by Wednesday, May 20 at 5 p.m. to receive the ZOOM link to join us

Our agenda includes a welcome from our executive director, Doris Miller; Doyon, Limited’s president and CEO, Aaron Schutt; and our board president, Jennifer Fate.

Plus, we’ll hear from our 2020 graduate speaker, Bruce Ervin, who graduated from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) with his bachelor’s degree in Alaska Native studies, and our alumni speaker (and board member!) Matthew Calhoun, who received his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) in 2002, his master’s in civil engineering from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2010, and a doctorate of philosophy in civil engineering from UAF in 2015. Calhoun is currently a tenure-track assistant professor of civil engineering at UAA.

Then, all of our 2020 grads in attendance will have the opportunity to introduce themselves live from wherever they are!

If you are graduating this year, please be sure to complete our 2020 graduate information form in advance of the event so we can include you in the graduate reception presentation.

A special thank you to Doyon, Limited’s communications and IT teams for helping us arrange this very special, first-of-its-kind Foundation event. We hope you can join us to celebrate the Class of 2020!

 

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Mary Jane Fate was a visionary leader and influential advocate who dedicated her life to creating opportunities for Alaska Native people. Mary Jane’s accomplishments are too numerous to list and include co-founding the Fairbanks Native Association, co-founding the Breast Cancer Detection Center, co-chairing the Alaska Federation of Natives, serving as president and board member of Rampart Village Corporation, Baan O Yeel Kon, and serving on the Alaska Airlines board of directors for 25 years. Mary Jane was one of the original lobbyists for the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, which created Alaska Native Corporations and conveyed 40 million acres of land to Alaska Natives.

We at Doyon Foundation are honored to have a scholarship in her name: The Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr. Leadership Fund was established by their daughter, Jennifer Fate, in 2017 to honor her parents’ accomplishments for the betterment of the Doyon people. The scholarship supports students who contribute to the social or economic well-being of the Alaska Native community – following in Mary Jane’s inspiring footsteps. We are pleased that this scholarship will carry forward Mary Jane’s incredible legacy to future generations.

We extend our heartfelt condolences to Mary Jane’s husband, Hugh “Bud” Fate, and her daughter, our board president, Jennifer, as well as all of her family and friends.

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Are you a graduate in the Class of 2020? If so, tell us all about it so we can help you celebrate! We’ve extended the response deadline to Wednesday, June 3, 2020.

In these most unusual times, we have to get creative in finding ways to celebrate our grads. We know you have been working hard for your graduation day, and though you may not have your traditional graduation celebration, we still want to honor your hard work and accomplishments.

We are asking all Doyon Foundation students who graduated or are graduating in the 2019 – 2020 school year to complete a short graduate information request form by the new deadline of Wednesday, June 3. We’ll feature the information you share in our 2020 electronic graduate yearbook! Check out the 2019 graduate yearbook on our website.

As an additional way to celebrate our 2020 graduates, we would like to create a special 2020 video featuring our 2020 graduates. In your video, you can briefly share about your future plans, thank those who have helped along the way, or give advice or encouragement to others.

There are two options for submitting your video:

  1. You can upload it when you complete the graduate information request form.
  2. You can also upload it at a later date using our video submission form.

Please make sure your video is horizontal, no more than 30 seconds long and that the file is no larger than 50 MB.

Help us celebrate all of your hard work and accomplishments! Please take a few moments now to fill out our graduate questionnaire and upload your graduate video.

From all of us here at Doyon Foundation, conGRADulations and thank you!

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Candidates sought for competitive scholarship review committee

There are two seats available on the Doyon Foundation competitive scholarship review committee. One reviewer must be from a rural community in the Doyon region. Individuals interested in giving back and helping students achieve their full potential are encouraged to consider serving on this important committee, which reviews, evaluates and scores student competitive scholarship applications. We have extended the application deadline to Wednesday, June 3, 2020, at 5 p.m.

To qualify for this position, candidates must:

  • Submit the online application and a current resume.
  • Be a Doyon shareholder.
  • Be age 18 or older.
  • Value and support higher education.
  • Be committed to serve a three-year term.
  • Have an internet-accessible computer with recent version of web browser installed (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera).
  • Attend an orientation in June in Fairbanks, either in person or via teleconference.
  • Spend 30 – 40 hours reviewing, evaluating and scoring all competitive scholarship applications online via the Doyon Foundation website.
  • Attend a one-day meeting in Fairbanks in July/August to award the scholarships.
  • Meet with Doyon Foundation administration to review and recommend competitive scholarship policy changes.

Please note that per IRS regulations, committee members cannot be employees of the Doyon Family of Companies or Doyon Foundation. Board members are also not eligible to serve on the committee. Also note that service on the scholarship review committee is on a voluntary basis.

Interested candidates should complete and submit the online candidate application, as well as a current resume, by Wednesday, June 3, 2020, at 5 p.m. The Doyon Foundation board of directors will select the new committee member at their next regularly scheduled meeting in Fairbanks.

For more information, please contact the Doyon Foundation at 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

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The deadline to apply for basic and competitive scholarships for the fall 2020 semester is coming up on Friday, May 15 and we want to be sure students have all the information they need to successfully apply. If you have any questions about our scholarships, eligibility, transcripts or the application process, please join us for one of these upcoming scholarship sessions:

Tuesday, April 28, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Join us by video: https://doyonmeeting.webex.com/doyonmeeting/j.php?MTID=macfb7d36f04f1f072eb7e3b9755cbc0d

Join us by phone: 1-844-740-1264 (USA toll-free) or +1-415-655-0003 (US toll)

Access code: 287 590 433

Tuesday, May 5, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Join us by video: https://doyonmeeting.webex.com/doyonmeeting/j.php?MTID=mc239fcc0d6d3766379e1a104bf7396c8

Join us by phone: 1-844-740-1264 (USA toll-free) or +1-415-655-0003 (US toll)

Access code: 287 274 277

Tuesday, May 12, 12 – 1 p.m.

Join us by video: https://doyonmeeting.webex.com/doyonmeeting/j.php?MTID=mcc801d74ff8dae8f610f9e378a5253f9

Join us by phone: 1-844-740-1264 (USA toll-free) or +1-415-655-0003 (US toll)

Access code: 288 317 095 

In the meantime, learn more about the upcoming scholarship deadline on our blog, or contact us at foundation@doyon.com or 907.459.2048.

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“I am a lifelong learner. Baasee’ for supporting me”

A school district administrator for the Fairbanks North Star Borough, Bev Kokrine is a veteran educator who’s pursuing a doctorate in Indigenous studies at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF). She is an active supporter of the mission of Doyon Foundation as it works to enhance the lives of shareholders through educational, career and cultural opportunities.

Bev’s parents are the late Franklin and Lillian Simon of Huslia. Her paternal grandparents are the late Edwin and Lydia Simon of Huslia; maternal grandparents are the late Grafton and Agnes Koyukuk of Allakaket.

Doyon Foundation: Your efforts to advance the work of Doyon Foundation are inspiring, Bev. How did you become involved in Doyon Languages Online, the Doyon Foundation project to help people learn the Alaska Native languages of the Doyon region?

Bev Kokrine: I was hoping to learn more Denaakk’e and when the opportunity to work with Doyon Languages Online came up, I was thrilled.

My late mother and her sisters, cousins and close friends would speak Denaakk’e and giggle; they had a bond through the language and I wanted to share the joke but my siblings and I didn’t learn the language except for a few words. I do remember “wash the dishes.” My emotion was tied to that phrase and I remember it well!

DF: How do those early experiences help shape your work as a content creator with Doyon Languages Online?

BK: Listening to mom and dad speak the language was music to my ears. I admire any youth who can speak his or her Native language.

When I was living on the UAF campus as a student, I loved listening to my friends speak Yup’ik and today I enjoy listening to a friend sing in her Native language to her grandchildren.

I love the singing and dancing at the Koyukon Athabascan potlatches of Huslia, where I’m from. I love potlatches — I feel whole during the singing and dancing and I want to know the words being sung.

All these experiences inspire me to work with Doyon Languages Online because I hope someday we’ll hear more youth speaking Denaakk’e. They’ll know their culture and heritage if we teach them their Native language now.

DF: Walk us through some your tasks as a Doyon Languages Online content creator.

BK: I help develop conversation phrases by composing a dialog in English and then working with language experts who provide phrasing to express that dialog in sentences in Denaakk’e. Language experts including Eliza Jones, Susan Paskvan, Marie Yaska and Dewey Hoffman then help me say those sentences so they’re recorded. My mother shared her knowledge, too, and I’ve learned that even though she lived in Huslia for many years, her dialect is somewhat different because she was raised upriver in Allakaket.

DF: What attracted you to teaching? You earned a bachelor’s degree in education in 1992 from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and have worked in education ever since. That’s real commitment.

BK: I always wanted to be teacher, from the time I was little and playing school by lining up old gas can boxes, pretending they were student desks. Sometimes I’d play postmaster — my mother was village postmaster for 30 years — but usually I’d play the teacher role.

As a student in Huslia from kindergarten through 10th grade, I admired my Alaska Native teachers like Dorothy Jordan and Lois Huntington. I saw that it was important to let children know that they’re loved, cared for, valued, that they can achieve whatever they dream.

DF: You’re in your second year as an administrator with the Fairbanks North Star Borough School District. How did a love of encouraging children shape your career?

BK: I began as a preschool teacher with the Fairbanks Native Association, then director of its Head Start program and then was hired by the school district where I taught for 20 years, mostly in kindergarten. I love children. I’ve learned that the “difficult student” has a story to tell.

And I like to establish bonds with students and their families so they feel welcome to participate in the child’s education.

DF: Can you share some highlights from your teaching life? Things that might inspire future teachers?

BK: You never know whose heart you’ll teach as an educator! Once my sister and I were at the fair and I heard someone say, “Mrs. Kokrine?” It was a “challenging” student from my first year of teaching. That 6-foot young man gave me a big hug. My sister took our picture.

One summer I received a random phone call from a young woman whom I taught as a kindergartener. She found my number in the phone book. She just wanted to say thank you!

DF: How have Doyon Foundation scholarships helped you achieve your education and career goals?

BK: Baasee’ to Doyon Foundation for supporting me. It’s with Doyon Foundation help that I graduated as a young mother. That scholarship money goes a long way: I remember having $5 and treating my children to French fries and a place to play. I don’t take those sorts of memories for granted.

DF: How did being a Doyon Foundation scholarship recipient lead to your commitment to learn Denaakk’e?

BK: Doyon Foundation is doing good work in helping students with scholarships and advancing language revitalization. In both cases, Doyon Foundation is helping people reach their goals.

DF: You’ve said the youth and Elders are on your heart.

BK: It’s a thought that guides my plan for a second career after I retire from education. I want to use Denaakk’e while helping Indigenous students succeed in higher education, such as college or trade school.

My dream is for Elders to have company and for young adults to have housing as they attend college or trade school. It’s a struggle coming from the village. I know that role all too well.

My goal is to finish my doctorate in Indigenous studies at UAF. It’s a challenging program; after my mother died in 2019, I briefly felt like putting the PhD on a back burner. Then my husband reminded me that I’m working toward this degree not just for me but for our children, our nieces, our nephews. For the youth. 

DF: What advice do you have for students thinking of going on to college or vocational training?

BK: Set goals, including daily goals for doing your homework.

My biggest challenge has been time management. I had to set goals to get my work done on time. Weekly goals and routines — for instance, setting aside time between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. to do homework — can help you avoid falling behind. It takes self-discipline.

Do your homework as soon as you can after class while information is still fresh in your brain. Reserve time to edit your college writing once a paper is done. Find a healthy cohort of other students. They can help support your studies.

DF: What would you say to students who find they must interrupt their studies? It can be hard to pick up where they’ve off.

BK: I’d encourage students to keep coming back even if you’ve had a year off. Keep on working at your goals. Come back to school even if you’re working full-time and attending school part-time. Never give up.

DF: Things you like to do include hosting family dinners, traveling, photography, and learning about other cultures. Others to add to this list?

BK: Yes. I serve on the board of the Fairbanks Native Association and I’m a member of the Alaska Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee, a statewide group within the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice.

I enjoy sharing about the Koyukon Athabascan potlatches specific to the Huslia area. Developing a protocol for these potlatches was the focus of my master’s degree project in education and these celebrations are important to me. I love the bonding, working together, and gift giving and feeding my soul. It’s a time of singing and dancing and honoring those who’ve passed on. These potlatches are part of who I am.

About Doyon Languages Online

Through the Doyon Language Online project, Doyon Foundation is developing introductory online lessons for Holikachuk, Denaakk’e (Koyukon), Benhti Kenaga’ (Lower Tanana), Hän, Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in), Deg Xinag, Dinak’i (Upper Kuskokwim), Nee’anděg’ (Tanacross) and Née’aaneegn’ (Upper Tanana). The project officially launched in summer 2019 with the first four courses, now available for free to all interested learners.

Doyon Languages Online is funded by grants from the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) and Alaska Native Education Program (ANEP).

About our Language Champion profile series

As Doyon Foundation continues to grow our language revitalization efforts in the Doyon region, we believe it is important to recognize people who are committed to learning and perpetuating their ancestral language. We are pleased to share some of these “language champion” profiles with you.

If you know a language champion, please nominate him or her by contacting our language program director at haytona@doyon.com. Language champions may also complete our profile questionnaire here. You may learn more about our language revitalization program on our website, or sign up to access the free Doyon Languages Online courses here.

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