Language Revitalization


Our July 2020 Native word of the month features a fun video made by Deloole’aanh Erickson, Dewey Kk’ołeyo Hoffman (with daughter Telele Iŋmaġana), Kimberly Me’enh Nezoonh Nicholas, and Anna Nelaatoh Clock.

Baahaa Nek’edenledegee = Pencil

Denaakk’e

Click the image below to view our July Native word of the month video!

July NWOM

For more translations, view our Native word of the month archives on the Foundation website.

We also invite you to access free online language-learning lessons by signing up for Doyon Languages Online! We currently have lessons available for HolikachukDenaakk’eBenhti Kenaga’ and Gwich’in, as well as a special set of Hän lessons based on the work of the late Isaac Juneby. All interested learners may sign up and access the courses at no charge – sign up today!

172_DLO Language Champion Promotion_GeorgeHolly_FB-IN“Dina xiyo ngitlith: Our thoughts are powerful”

An artist and songwriter who grew up in Ts’eldahthnu (Soldotna) on the Kahtnu (Kenai) River, George Holly is a content coordinator with Doyon Languages Online whose learning is guided by the wisdom of Chief Peter John: “God has given us each a language to praise Him with.”

George’s parents are the late Joanne Holly of Holy Cross and the late George Holly, Sr., who came to Anchorage, Alaska, when he was 11, in 1951. George’s maternal grandparents are the late Nick and Nellie Demientieff of Holy Cross. Nellie Demientieff grew up in Anvik and together Nick and Nellie raised 10 children, including Sam Demientieff, Irene Catalone, Sugar Merculieff, Tiny Devlin and Lolly Demientieff.

George is the owner of Holly House, a guest house on the Kenai River. His language is Deg Xinag, the language of Alaska Native people of the Lower Yukon and Innoko Rivers.

Doyon Foundation: Take us back to early days of learning your language. Who and what inspires you?

George Holly: My first language teacher and mentor was Ellen Savage, wife of my grandpa’s first cousin, Pius Savage. I was 24 years old when Ellen taught me my first words. She took my hands into hers and told me to never let her words fall from me.

I learned from Ellen that language can be what she would call dinayetr — our breath — and what she’d refer to simply as the good life. I’ve learned that language is not only a vehicle of communication but a good work. It affirms community life, service and time-tested generational experience for good thought.

DF: In addition to providing learning units since joining Doyon Languages Online last year, you remain a diligent student of Deg Xinag. How do the two roles fit together?

GH: I’ve been learning my language for 25 years, sometimes through weekly distance education classes, sometimes listening to and studying the printed text of oral histories, and sometimes through university courses or language development institutes. In 1999 I moved to Shageluk, near Holy Cross in our cultural area of Western Alaska, to be nearer to speakers of Deg Xinag. I stayed nine months.

My teachers have included many Elders, among Deg Xit’an people and also Tlinglit and Dena’ina people. I’m amazed to hear the same spirit of loving guidance in each. (When performing at Camai a few years back, I heard Yup’ik Elders speak to their dance groups backstage and was stunned to hear that same uplifting and ennobling speech there. We all share it.) The Elders pass down what they had learned about life from their own “old people” about community traditions and right living with the world.

DF: That seems like your main point — that language is much more than getting across our thoughts.

GH: Learning and speaking one’s language has the potential to open things inside you, connect you in untold ways to the prayers and hopes, joys and knowledge of those who came before.

DF: You stress the value of listening when it comes to language learning.

GH: Listening, doing activities in the language, being open to what’s being said — these have all helped me learn my language. And working with kids. “Going North Song” and “The Squirrel Love Song” and “Naqanaga” are some of the songs I’ve written being sung across the state and the Yukon Territory.

Growing up outside of my cultural region I didn’t take part in much of the ceremonial life of our community. But I’m Deg Xit’an — one of “the local people” — and I’ve joked that it means wherever I was, I was one of the locals. It works to take part in the local life— supporting the local language is something needed, necessary and good.

How can you say you really lived in a place or really loved a place if you haven’t heard, supported, loved and spoken the language of a place?

DF: You are a talented songwriter; “Naqanaga (Our Language),” “Chenh ditr’al iy (Until We See Each Other Again)” and “Ani Chonh Igili’eyh (Over the Rainbow in Deg Xinag)” are some examples of songs you’ve worked on. What role do you feel music plays in language learning?

GH: I feel strongly about using my talents to support language revitalization. I write music for schools, with teachers, students in small groups and individuals – all with local language. Lorna Vent from Huslia said “music is for building a spirit.” I write music to help build that spirit and the intangibles to experience language in a personal way. Students I’ve worked with usually like to try to add more Native language once they feel it for themselves. 

DF: Where does your work with Doyon Languages Online fit in to your goals as a language learner?

GH: Distance is a big challenge when it comes to being among speakers, learning the language and using it frequently. When I travel anywhere I try to visit places where I know language learning is happening and spend good time with folks.

Helping people overcome these challenges by developing units to people have online access to our language is part of why working for Doyon Languages Online has been so poignant and purpose-driven for me.

DF: You want to become more methodical about language learning. What would that look like?

GH: I’d like to learn more about moving beyond working with individuals. For instance, what can be done so that language takes on more life in a family context? How can culture camps and weekly or monthly or quarterly community events support intergenerational interaction in the language?

How could parents be empowered to use the language with their young ones and other family members? And since kids learn so quickly, how might roles be maintained when a child advances faster than adult family members? How can a social environment be built and supported so that local language use is favored and preferred?

Moreover, regarding language in groups: How does a community experience hope?

I believe the arts help in this area.

These are things I’d like to address. There’s so much to learn and share. Ting getiy dixet’a. Xogho ntr’ixetonik. The trail is awfully rough. We’ll work at it together.

DF: Any closing thoughts?

GH: When it comes to involving Elders working on Doyon Languages Online, Edna Deacon and Jim Dementi deserve mention. It wouldn’t happen without them. And I thank Doyon Foundation for the confidence it has in my role with Doyon Languages Online.

My language learning efforts are dedicated to Ellen Savage, my first teacher, and in memory of my dear folks who allowed me to be a person in my own skin and who were and are such encouragers of art and “the good life.” Dogidinh, xisrigidisddhinh sidithnaqay neg! “Thank you, I’m grateful, my dear parents!”

About Doyon Languages Online

Through the Doyon Language Online project, Doyon Foundation is developing introductory online lessons for Holikachuk, Denaakk’e (Koyukon), Benhti Kenaga’ (Lower Tanana), Hän, Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in), Deg Xinag, Dinak’i (Upper Kuskokwim), Nee’anděg’ (Tanacross) and Née’aaneegn’ (Upper Tanana). The project officially launched in summer 2019 with the first four courses, now available for free to all interested learners.

Doyon Languages Online is funded by a three-year grant from the Administration for Native Americans (ANA), awarded in 2016, and an additional three-year grant from the Alaska Native Education Program (ANEP), awarded in 2017.

As Doyon Foundation continues to grow our language revitalization efforts in the Doyon region, we believe it is important to recognize people who are committed to learning and perpetuating their ancestral language. We are pleased to share some of these “language champion” profiles with you.

If you know a language champion, please nominate him or her by contacting our language program director at haytona@doyon.com. Language champions may also complete our profile questionnaire here. You may learn more about our language revitalization program on our website, or sign up to access the free Doyon Languages Online courses here.

4E43AF6E-80C9-4DD9-B4CB-55ED6C13A31AToday we are excited to announce the winners of the drawing as part of our 2020 language revitalization interest survey, in partnership with Tanana Chiefs Conference. We were so happy that we had over 1,000 respondents. Baasee’ to everyone who shared their thoughts on how we can work together to lift up our languages in the Doyon region.

We randomly selected six winners of $50 gift cards and three winners  of $100 gift cards using the website, Wheel of Names. Congratulations to our $100 winners:

  • Stephanie Blue
  • Christine Erhart
  • Carra Geary

And our $50 winners:

  • Samantha J Quinn
  • Kelly Lincoln
  • Charles Wulf
  • Janet Wallace
  • Natalee Smoke
  • Allison Huntington

We will be sharing the results from the survey shortly, so please keep an eye on our blog, website and social media channels. Thank you again to everyone who participated!

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Photo courtesy of Kenneth Lu

We are pleased to share our June 2020 Native word of the month! Thank you to Allan Hayton for providing these Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in) translations: 

June = Vanan Ch’iighoo (Month When the Birds Lay Their Eggs)

Nihts’igwiheenjyaa = We will help each other.

Diihaa gogwantrii dai’, nihts’igwiheenjyaa goo’aii. = When we fall upon hard times, we must help one another.

 

For more translations, view our Native word of the month archives on the Foundation website.

We also invite you to access free online language-learning lessons by signing up for Doyon Languages Online! We currently have lessons available for HolikachukDenaakk’eBenhti Kenaga’ and Gwich’in, as well as a special set of Hän lessons based on the work of the late Isaac Juneby. All interested learners may sign up and access the courses at no charge – sign up today!

BertinaOur language is the missing link to our identity”

Bertina Titus is the daughter of Carol Reid of Minto and the late Carl H. Ramay Jr. of Missouri. Bertinas maternal grandparents are Neal and Geraldine Charlie of Minto; her paternal grandparents are Florence and Melvin Ockert of Missouri. Bertina wishes to recognize her husband, Gabriel Titus; children Leanna Knight and Tehya, Desirae, Eliah, Asher, Traeton and Jerren Titus; brother Byron Charlie; and sister Annie Silas. 

Bertina lives in Wasilla and is a language specialist whose employers include the Yukon-Kuskokiwm School District and Doyon Foundation. She received a Doyon Foundation scholarship while enrolled in the University of Alaska Fairbanks where she studied accounting and rural development. Bertinas language is Benhti Kenaga, spoken by Alaska Native people of the lower Tanana region

Doyon Foundation: You see a connection between the example of Elders and language learning efforts today. Can you say more about that?

Bertina Titus: Our Elders were very strong in all they did because they operated out of every part of their Native values. This is why they lived and endured so much not only for their survival but our survival as well.

My grandparents Neal and Geraldine Charlie are among people who were instrumental in teaching me to speak my language. The list includes my husband, Gabriel; his grandmother Elsie Titus; and Sarah Silas. I’ve learned from some of the nicest people I know.

I truly feel that our language is the missing link to our identity. Without this language that God gave us, we may never reach the full potential that God created us to be.

DF: You consider yourself a language learner even while you’re helping to teach others.

BT: Yes, I’m still trying to learn. I’ve worked with Doyon Foundation on video lessons and with Susan Paskavan with Yukon-Kuskokiwm School District. One of the best language-learning techniques is repetition. Hands-on strategies, such as activities at home, would be good too even though it can seem hard at times to put this approach into practice.

DF: What advice do you have if people are unable to practice regularly?

BT: A big challenge is if you have nobody to speak the language with, someone who really understands it, or if you’re just not using it every day. To overcome challenges I just still try. I have the language in my heart and keep trying.

DF: Your hopes for language learning including someday moving to Minto where you were raised. There’s a link between fond memories of your growing-up years and your passion for language learning today.

BT: I loved living in Minto. I remember playing outdoors a lot; we felt pretty free! And when I was around my grandparents I’d hear the language being spoken. In school we were taught some basic Benhti Kenaga’ but not very much.

I would love to move back to Minto and teach the language in a class during school or after school. This would be a way to revive our language because it would involve others, not just school kids.

DF: Something you’d like others to know?

BT: I truly want to be a fluent speaker so that I may teach and learn all I can to help others. I want to be able to tell my grandpa someday when I see him in Heaven that I succeeded in his dream — and my dream — of helping others to learn our Native language. Everyone should have an interest in our God-given gift!

About Doyon Languages Online

Through the Doyon Language Online project, Doyon Foundation is developing introductory online lessons for Holikachuk, Denaakk’e (Koyukon), Benhti Kenaga’ (Lower Tanana), Hän, Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in), Deg Xinag, Dinak’i (Upper Kuskokwim), Nee’anděg’ (Tanacross) and Née’aaneegn’ (Upper Tanana). The project officially launched in summer 2019 with the first four courses, now available for free to all interested learners.

Doyon Languages Online is funded by a three-year grant from the Administration for Native Americans (ANA), awarded in 2016, and an additional three-year grant from the Alaska Native Education Program (ANEP), awarded in 2017.

As Doyon Foundation continues to grow our language revitalization efforts in the Doyon region, we believe it is important to recognize people who are committed to learning and perpetuating their ancestral language. We are pleased to share some of these “language champion” profiles with you.

If you know a language champion, please nominate him or her by contacting our language program director at foundation@doyon.com. Language champions may also complete our profile questionnaire here. You may learn more about our language revitalization program on our website, or sign up to access the free Doyon Languages Online courses here.

167_DLO Language Learner Promotion_FB-IN

Anna Clock is a participant in the teacher training through the Doyon Languages Online project. She has formed a learning group with her brother, William, who is using Doyon Languages Online to learn Denaakk’e. They are the grandchildren of Regina Clock of Kaltag. Their parents are Eric Clock of Kaltag and Cindy Clock of Yakima, Washington. Here, Anna shares with us about their experience teaching and learning via distance – Anna at her home in Anchorage, and William working on his tug boat on the Cook Inlet.

Doyon Languages Online, a Doyon Foundation project, is developing online language-learning lessons for the endangered Native languages of the Doyon region. The lessons are available for free to all interested learners. Courses in Holikachuk, Gwich’inDenaakk’e and Benhti Kenaga’ were launched in summer 2019, and the remaining courses will be released this year. Learn more and sign up at www.doyonfoundation.com/dlo.

If you are teaching or learning a language using Doyon Languages Online, we would love to hear your story as well! Please send us photos and tell us about your experience by emailing foundation@doyon.com.

April 20, 2020, story and photos courtesy of Anna Clock

photo 1 - assignmentsWilliam and I video-called through Google Hangouts after the Doyon Languages Online spring teacher training on Monday night. It was our first attempt at distance-learning, and it went well.

When he logged onto his Doyon Languages Online account, he was able to see the class I enrolled him to, and all his assignments.

We agreed that one lesson per week is a good pace. We will meet on Monday nights, and do part of the lesson together. He will try to finish it by Friday. He is a quick learner, so I think he will be successful while still balancing work on his tug boat.

During our call, he was able to screen share, so I could watch him go through Unit 1, Lesson 2. There was some background noise from the engine on his boat, but I could still hear him pretty well. I couldn’t hear the audio from the lesson as he played it, so I asked him to repeat the phrases and I could hear him well. He was picking up the pronunciation good from the audio clips in the lesson.

photo 2

I remembered from K’etsoo’s (Susan Paskvan) class that it was helpful to me as a learner when she pointed out what an individual part of a Denaakk’e phrase meant. This helped me remember the whole phrase’s meaning, so I passed this practice down to my brother and it helped him as well.

I was thankful to have a close family member I am comfortable with supporting me in my new teaching endeavor. It took the pressure off, and we had fun.

After going through part of the lesson, we took a break to play “show me.” We used a few of the flash cards K’etsoo shared.

Our whole call lasted for about an hour and went by quick.

 

In our May Native Word of the Month, we are pleased to share the compilation of our recent COVID-19 campaign, featuring important reminders in our Native languages.

A very special thank you to our amazing translators: Eliza Jones and Marie Yaska (Denaakk’e/Koyukon), Steven Nikolai Sr. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim), Kenneth Frank and Allan Hayton (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in), Ruth Ridley (Hän), and Polly Hyslop and Olga Lovick (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana).

As always, we welcome additional translations – if you have one, please share here on our blog or on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or LinkedIn.

160_COVID-19v3_HANDS_blog

Keeping everyone safe and healthy is top of mind for all of us at Doyon Foundation these days. We’ve worked with our terrific group of language speakers to develop a series of helpful translations in our Native languages. Here is our first, with the important reminder to “wash your hands.”

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Continuing our COVID-19 translation series, we encourage you to “stay at home” in several of our Native languages.

  • Neyekh khwts’en’ tiyoyh. (Benhti Kokhut’ana Kenaga’/Lower Tanana)
  • Ngiyix dhedo. (Deg Xinag)
  • Yeh leedo. (Denaakk’e/Koyukon)
  • Nikayih zedo. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim)
  • Nakhwizheh khaihłan dook’ii. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)
  • Nzhoo dhįjaa. (Hän)
  • Aŋiḷaaqsimauraaq. (Inupiaq)
  • Shyah dhįįdah. (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana)

160_COVID-19v3_PROTECT2_FB-IN

Our next set of COVID-19 translations remind us that we are taking all of these pandemic precautions to “protect our Elders and children.”

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One of the most important things you can do to stay healthy is “don’t touch your face.” Here’s how to say it in several of our Native languages.

160_COVID-19v3_DISTANCE_blog

We’re hearing a lot about “social distancing” as the world addresses the COVID-19 pandemic. Here is how our Native languages refer to this important concept:

  • Vi’ogh Na’a Gholanh. (Deg Xinag)
  • Nedaakoon neełts’uhuhu lʉ (Denaakk’e/Koyukon)
  • Sich’odo’. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim)
  • Nihłeeghaih nohthat kwaa. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)
  • Łihghàt hontlʼä̀t dä̀hchʼee kǒo. (Hän)
  • Ka tim miu suNaqataguuq siak Laaq Gum miu raal lakta pakma, maana sakniGun nakungitchauq qaniqNailhani. (Inupiaq)
  • Ch’iduugn Dadhaltth’iign. (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana)

160_COVID-19v3_PEOPLE_blog

The sacrifices we are all making during this pandemic are challenging. However, in these COVID-19 translations, we remind ourselves that “we’re doing it for our people.”

160_COVID-19v3_COVER_blog

This COVID-19 translation reminds us to “cover your cough and sneeze” in several of our Native languages:

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“Listen to the news, stay informed” encourages these COVID-19 translations:

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This time of staying at home is a great opportunity to “work on your house chores.” Here’s how to say it in several of our Native languages:

160_COVID-19v3_SEW_blog

While we are all staying at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s important to keep your mind active and body moving. We enjoy cultural activities, like sewing boots, gloves and beadwork. Here is how to say “sew” in several of our Native languages:

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From the bottom of our hearts, we encourage you to “take care” of yourself and others during this challenging time of COVID-19.

  • Idiyił uxdiniyh. (Deg Xinag)
  • Gwiinzii adak’ootii. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)
  • Hǫǫsu’ diik’anįlta’ de’. (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana)

For more translations, view our Native word of the month archives on the Foundation website.

We also invite you to access free online language-learning lessons by signing up for Doyon Languages Online! We currently have lessons available for HolikachukDenaakk’eBenhti Kenaga’ and Gwich’in, as well as a special set of Hän lessons based on the work of the late Isaac Juneby. All interested learners may sign up and access the courses at no charge – sign up today!

Stay safe, stay healthy and take care of each other.

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From the bottom of our hearts, we encourage you to “take care” of yourself and others during this challenging time of COVID-19.

  • Idiyił uxdiniyh. (Deg Xinag)
  • Gwiinzii adak’ootii. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)
  • Hǫǫsu’ diik’anįlta’ de’. (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana)

Have a translation in another language? Share it with us by commenting on this post!

A very special thank you to our amazing translators: Eliza Jones and Marie Yaska (Denaakk’e/Koyukon), Steven Nikolai Sr. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim), Kenneth Frank and Allan Hayton (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in), Ruth Ridley (Hän), and Polly Hyslop and Olga Lovick (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana).

Stay safe and take care of yourselves and each other.

160_COVID-19v3_SEW_blog

While we are all staying at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s important to keep your mind active and body moving. We enjoy cultural activities, like sewing boots, gloves and beadwork. Here is how to say “sew” in several of our Native languages:

  • Łanch’edalkoyh. (Benhti Kokhut’ana Kenaga’/Lower Tanana)
  • Q’on-Gidiłqon’. (Deg Xinag)
  • K’onoydełkon’. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim)
  • K’eekaih kwaii kat k’eechąąhkaii. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)
  • Nzhoo zhìt äʼnintlʼùʼ. (Hän)
  • Naach’inįįtl’u’. (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana)

Have a translation in another language? Share it with us by commenting on this post!

A very special thank you to our amazing translators: Eliza Jones and Marie Yaska (Denaakk’e/Koyukon), Steven Nikolai Sr. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim), Kenneth Frank and Allan Hayton (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in), Ruth Ridley (Hän), and Polly Hyslop and Olga Lovick (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana).

Stay safe, take care of yourselves and each other, and watch for more translations coming soon!

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This time of staying at home is a great opportunity to “work on your house chores.” Here’s how to say it in several of our Native languages:

  • Edidranh yix tonxalyaxdi dranh xelanh. (Deg Xinag)
  • Nikayih hisrut’elanh. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim)
  • Nakhwazheh googwitr’it haa geenohtii. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)
  • Nzhoo zhìt wëtrʼit jinjįį. (Hän)
  • Indah. (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana)

Have a translation in another language? Share it with us by commenting on this post!

A very special thank you to our amazing translators: Eliza Jones and Marie Yaska (Denaakk’e/Koyukon), Steven Nikolai Sr. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim), Kenneth Frank and Allan Hayton (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in), Ruth Ridley (Hän), and Polly Hyslop and Olga Lovick (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana).

Stay safe, take care of yourselves and each other, and watch for more translations coming soon!

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“Listen to the news, stay informed” encourages today’s COVID-19 translations:

  • Xunik idhałtth’onh. (Deg Xinag)
  • Hunek oolaaluhtl’onh yegge ts’ehednee ts’e hokko. (Denaakk’e/Koyukon)
  • Kwnch uzazełts’onh. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim)
  • TV kat gwandak oodhohk’ii. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)
  • Tsʼik haa chʼudhä̀htthʼąą. (Hän)
  • Uunik dįįtth’egn. (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana)

Have a translation in another language? Share it with us by commenting on this post!

A very special thank you to our amazing translators: Eliza Jones and Marie Yaska (Denaakk’e/Koyukon), Steven Nikolai Sr. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim), Kenneth Frank and Allan Hayton (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in), Ruth Ridley (Hän), and Polly Hyslop and Olga Lovick (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana).

Stay safe, take care of yourselves and each other, and watch for more translations coming soon!

160_COVID-19v3_COVER_blog

Today’s COVID-19 translation reminds us to “cover your cough and sneeze” in several of our Native languages:

  • Ngits’its. Yił’isr. (Deg Xinag)
  • Deelkkuł tuh laadok yee deelkkuł hunk’e netsuts yee deelkkuł. Nelaan k’edaadeeloh. (Denaakk’e/Koyukon)
  • Ch’ivit zhit ankoo. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)

Have a translation in another language? Share it with us by commenting on this post!

A very special thank you to our amazing translators: Eliza Jones and Marie Yaska (Denaakk’e/Koyukon), Steven Nikolai Sr. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim), Kenneth Frank and Allan Hayton (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in), Ruth Ridley (Hän), and Polly Hyslop and Olga Lovick (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana).

Stay safe, take care of yourselves and each other, and watch for more translations coming soon!

160_COVID-19v3_PEOPLE_blog

The sacrifices we are all making during this pandemic are challenging. However, in today’s COVID-19 translations, we remind ourselves that “we’re doing it for our people.”

  • Denaaledon’ kkaa oho dohʉt’aanh. (Denaakk’e/Koyukon)
  • Dina’ena modits’itanh. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim)
  • Dinjii naii datthak eenjit t’igwii’in. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)
  • Jëjee iin haa dä̀trʼëjįį. (Hän)
  • Neekeey iin xah hǫǫ dzidį’. (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana)

Have a translation in another language? Share it with us by commenting on this post!

A very special thank you to our amazing translators: Eliza Jones and Marie Yaska (Denaakk’e/Koyukon), Steven Nikolai Sr. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim), Kenneth Frank and Allan Hayton (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in), Ruth Ridley (Hän), and Polly Hyslop and Olga Lovick (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana).

Stay safe, take care of yourselves and each other, and watch for more translations coming soon!

160_COVID-19v3_DISTANCE_blog

We’re hearing a lot about “social distancing” as the world addresses the COVID-19 pandemic. Here is how our Native languages refer to this important concept:

  • Vi’ogh Na’a Gholanh. (Deg Xinag)
  • Nedaakoon neełts’uhuhu lʉ (Denaakk’e/Koyukon)
  • Sich’odo’. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim)
  • Nihłeeghaih nohthat kwaa. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)
  • Łihghàt hontlʼä̀t dä̀hchʼee kǒo. (Hän)
  • Ka tim miu suNaqataguuq siak Laaq Gum miu raal lakta pakma, maana sakniGun nakungitchauq qaniqNailhani. (Inupiaq)
  • Ch’iduugn Dadhaltth’iign. (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana)

Have a translation in another language? Share it with us by commenting on this post!

A very special thank you to our amazing translators: Eliza Jones and Marie Yaska (Denaakk’e/Koyukon), Steven Nikolai Sr. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim), Kenneth Frank and Allan Hayton (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in), Ruth Ridley (Hän), and Polly Hyslop and Olga Lovick (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana).

Stay safe, take care of yourselves and each other, and watch for more translations coming soon!

160_COVID-19v3_FACE_blog

One of the most important things you can do to stay healthy is “don’t touch your face.” Here’s how to say it in several of our Native languages.

  • Ngina’ vogh dighenolniyh. (Deg Xinag)
  • Nedaakoon nenaan’ aadeelneyh. (Denaakk’e/Koyukon)
  • Ninya’ vahtat shro’. (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in)

Have a translation in another language? Share it with us by commenting on this post!

A very special thank you to our amazing translators: Eliza Jones and Marie Yaska (Denaakk’e/Koyukon), Steven Nikolai Sr. (Dinak’i/Upper Kuskokwim), Kenneth Frank and Allan Hayton (Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa/Gwich’in), Ruth Ridley (Hän), and Polly Hyslop and Olga Lovick (Nee’aanèegn’/Upper Tanana).

Stay safe, take care of yourselves and each other, and watch for more translations coming soon!

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