Scholarships


The Alaska legislature created the Alaska Education Grant (AEG) program to provide need-based financial assistance to eligible Alaska students attending qualifying postsecondary educational institutions in Alaska.

Beginning with the 2013-2014 school year, the grant is funded through the Alaska Higher Education Investment Fund, a new source of long-term funding for AEG and Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS) awards established in 2012 by the Alaska legislature.

 How much is the award?

Grant awards typically range from $500 to $4,000 per academic year for students who have qualifying unmet financial need. Criteria determining award priority includes:

  • Financial need of the student, determined by their Estimated Family Contribution (EFC)
  • Date of filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
  • Prior recipient of the AEG beginning 2015-2016
  • School enrollment at full-time vs. half-time status

Students with the highest financial need will be awarded in order of need until funds are exhausted. Students enrolled in 15 credits per semester may be eligible for an increased award amount. A student may not receive more than a total of $16,000 in AEG award money over the course of their education.

Click HERE to apply.

“For anyone lucky enough to have been mentored by them, Hugh and Mary Jane’s words were life changing” – Niisha Walsh

Niisha

A University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) May 2018 graduate with a bachelor’s degree in social work, Niisha Walsh is the daughter of Maureen Walsh of Tanana and Dewayne Sanford of Tok. Her step-mother is Lena Sanford of Beaver Creek, Yukon, Canada. Niisha’s maternal grandparents are the late John Walsh, Sr. and Esther Starr-Walsh. Her paternal grandparents are the late Walter and Laura Sanford of Tok.

“I’m extremely grateful to be the first recipient of a scholarship that honors two people whose passion for bettering the lives of others continues through those who were privileged to be mentored by them,” Niisha says.

Niisha has made a point of meeting people who’ve benefited from the efforts of Mary Jane and Hugh Fate throughout their 65-year marriage. Effects are plain to see: “For anyone lucky enough to have been mentored by them, Hugh and Mary Jane’s words were life changing,” Niisha says.

Born in Rampart and among the first Alaska Native women to attend UAF, Mary Jane drew on her Athabascan subsistence traditions to overcome hardship and become a lifelong leader at the state and federal levels on behalf of Alaska Native people and the status of women. In 2014, she was inducted into the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame in recognition of her role, along with others, to lobby Congress for passage of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971. A Korean War veteran who came to Alaska in search of new opportunities, Hugh is a retired dentist whose many leadership achievements include serving as president of the University of Alaska Regents and as Alaska state representative from Fairbanks.IMG_2992-001

Established in 2017 by their daughter, Jennifer Fate, the Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr. Leadership Fund is among Doyon Foundation scholarships for shareholders pursuing higher education in a variety of programs.

“This fund celebrates those who strive to make our community a better place, and our people a stronger and healthier people,” says Jennifer, a member of the Doyon, Limited, and the Doyon Foundation boards. Applications are encouraged from Doyon shareholders studying health care, mental health, business and other professions that advance Alaska Native business, cultural or community interests. The next application deadline is May 15, 2018.

Niisha, the first recipient of this scholarship, traces her passion for helping people in part to her grandmother, the late Laura Sanford, with whom Niisha spent much of her childhood.

“She’s remembered as a compassionate but no-nonsense woman, rich in her Athabascan culture,” Niisha says, adding that her grandmother often opened her home to children from outlying villages who needed a safe place to stay while attending school. “She was selfless, resilient and fearless.”

Witnessing her grandmother’s willingness to help others led Niisha to her own commitment to improving the health and safety of youth and families. Today she’s a foster care and adoption recruitment specialistin the Child Protection Program at Fairbanks-based Tanana Chiefs Conference (TCC). Niisha’s goals include earning a master’s degree in social work through the advanced placement graduate program at the University of Alaska Anchorage and remaining with TCC, working in the best interest of Alaska Native children.

“I want to continue building community and tribal relationships to better serve youth,” Niisha says, echoing the passion for activism that the Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr. Leadership Scholarship seeks to foster.

“This leadership scholarship celebrates the positive ‘can-do’ activism that has helped build our innovative system of for-profit and nonprofit Native organizations, all geared to improve the well-being of our people. It upholds the values of self-reliance, productivity and creative collaboration for the betterment of our community,” Jennifer says. “Niisha represents these positive values and will carry these qualities into her work and studies.”

A recipient of Doyon Foundation scholarships throughout her college education, Niisha says she’s come to consider the Foundation part of a team that motivates her to always do her best. “I can’t thank Doyon Foundation enough for its generosity,” she says.

Since graduating high school from Tok School in 2002, Niisha’s work has focused on improving the lives of young people, often through education. Volunteering over the years has included time as a basketball and tee-ball coach and working with the Johnson O’Malley Native Youth Basketball Tournament. Before joining TCC, she worked in the Tribal Home Visiting Program of Fairbanks Native Association. Today she serves as treasurer of the Alaska Native Social Workers Association.

“My short-term goal is to continue to raise awareness regarding the need for Alaska Native foster homes throughout the Doyon region,” Niisha says. For instance, in 2013, the state reported that Alaska Native children represented more than half of the roughly 2,000 children needing foster care statewide. However, less than a third of licensed foster homes in Fairbanks that year were Alaska Native foster homes.

Niisha’s long-term goals include developing a program offering youth in and out of the child welfare system a way to resolve obstacles to well-being while building on their strengths.

Niisha enjoys family dinners, watching football, baking and boat rides. She’s looking forward to time with family before embarking on her master’s degree, and she encourages other students to remember that educational success depends in part on surrounding yourself with people who push you to be your best.

“When you’re not feeling motivated to write that 10-page paper,” Niisha says, “find people who tell you, ‘Eye on the prize.’ Find people who want to see you win and hold onto them.”

For incoming American Indian and Alaska Native MSW students who plan to work in Native communities, the Kathryn M. Buder

Charitable Foundation offers a select number of full scholarships.

These scholarships provide tuition, monthly stipends, professional development opportunities, and books for two years of full-time study at the Brown School.

Upon graduation, Buder scholarship recipients commit to at least two years of professional service in Indian Country.

See below link for more information.

BuderBrochure_2018.pdf

The Center for Native American Youth at The Aspen Institute (CNAY) has partnered with Brown University Pre-College Programs to award full-tuition, residential scholarships for two Native students to attend a Brown University Pre-College program during Summer 2018. The CNAY-Brown Summer Scholarship covers tuition, room and board, application fees, and program fees.

CNAY-Brown Scholars have three summer program options to choose from: Summer at Brown, the Brown Leadership Institute, and the Brown Environmental Learning Lab (BELL) at Rhode Island. All programs take place on or near Brown’s campus in Providence, Rhode Island.  Click here for more information.

All application materials are due at 11:59 PM Pacific Time on Friday, April 15, 2018. CNAY will notify all applicants of their final application status by April 30, 2018.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY?
Applicants for the CNAY-Brown Summer Scholarship must meet all the following criteria. CNAY cannot make an exception to eligibility requirements.

  • Must be currently enrolled in high school grades 9-12;
  • Must identify as Indigenous and reside within the United States;
  • Must demonstrate a connection to tribal culture and/or community; and
  • Must be at least 15 years old by the start of the program.

HOW TO APPLY:
A complete application includes all of the following materials, which must be submitted online to CNAY by 11:59 PT on Sunday, April 15, 2018.

  • CNAY-Brown Summer Scholarship Application. Requires brief written responses to multiple prompts and transcript (unofficial transcripts acceptable).
  • Recommendation Form #1 (submitted online by recommender). This form should be submitted by a guidance counselor, principal, or headmaster commenting on the student’s engagement, maturity, grit, and motivation for participating in the Brown Pre-College Summer Program of the applicant’s choice.
  • Recommendation Form #2 (submitted online by recommender). This form must be submitted by an instructor who teaches in a field closely related to the program and course the applicant hopes to attend at Brown University. The recommender’s comments should describe the student’s knowledge of that field, overall intellectual curiosity, and assess the student’s qualification to engage in concentrated study. This recommendation should speak to the applicant’s potential to benefit from the experience at Brown.

For more information about the CNAY-Brown Summer Scholarship, click here. For questions, contact Amber Richardson at (202) 736-3577 or amber.richardson@aspeninst.org.

 

 

GCI is proud to announce a new statewide Scholarship program!

Over the past 10 years, through the UUI Scholarship program, GCI has assisted hundreds of students in the UUI service area.

GCI is reaffirming and expanding their commitment to helping Alaskan students achieve success.  Beginning April 1st, they will welcome scholarship applications from highly motivated Alaskan students statewide.

GCI will be awarding 70 students with $2,000 scholarships to be used for tuition and books for the 2018-2019 school year.  Applications must be received by April 30th.

GCI is proud to invest in Alaska’s students as they prepare to build Alaska’s future.  For more information, please visit gci.com/careers or email gcicsholarships@gci.com.

Want to become a teacher? Incoming UA undergraduate students can apply for the President’s Teach for Alaska Scholarship between March 12 – May 1, 2018 for a chance to receive $12,000 toward the pursuit of a teaching degree at the University of Alaska. Learn more at http://alaska.edu/learntoteach/

27th Annual June Nelson Scholarship Competition

Win a $1,500 Scholarship Application

New Deadline: March 16, 2018

The Association of Alaska School Boards is proud to announce its 27th Annual Scholarship Award Competition. The June Nelson Memorial Scholarship is named in honor of the late June Nelson, longtime school board member from Kotzebue. June contributed much to the cause of education and will be remembered for her outstanding service on behalf of Alaska’s children.

This 2017-2018 school year, AASB will award fifteen graduating seniors each with a $1,500 scholarship to apply toward their post-secondary education. The scholarship may be applied toward the student’s choice of a business, trade, or a college institution.

HOW TO APPLY

https://aasb.org/june-nelson-memorial-scholarship/?platform=hootsuit

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