Support the Foundation


Candidates sought for scholarship review committee

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Help us connect students with scholarships – apply to serve on our competitive scholarship review committee!

Would you like to help connect students with scholarships? We have the perfect opportunity! We currently have three open seats on the Doyon Foundation competitive scholarship review committee. Interested candidates are encouraged to apply by Friday, April 28.

To qualify for this position, candidates must:

  • Be a Doyon shareholder.
  • Be age 18 or older.
  • Value and support higher education.
  • Be committed to serve a three-year term.
  • Have an internet-accessible computer with recent version of web browser installed (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera).
  • Attend an orientation in May/June in Fairbanks, either in person or via teleconference.
  • Spend 30 – 40 hours reviewing, evaluating and scoring all competitive scholarship applications online via the Doyon Foundation website.
  • Attend a one-day meeting in Fairbanks in June/July to award the scholarships.
  • Meet with Doyon Foundation administration to review and recommend competitive scholarship policy changes.

Candidates residing in rural areas are preferred, but applications from urban candidates are also welcomed. Please note that per IRS regulations, committee members cannot be employees of the Doyon Family of Companies or Doyon Foundation.

Service on the scholarship review committee is on a voluntary basis. Individuals interested in giving back and helping students achieve their full potential are encouraged to consider serving on this important committee.

Interested candidates should submit a résumé and a letter of interest outlining why they’d like to serve to Doris Miller, Foundation executive director, at millerd@doyon.com by Friday, April 28. The Doyon Foundation board of directors will select the new committee member at their next regularly scheduled meeting in Fairbanks.

For more information, please contact Doyon Foundation at 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

df-pcg-meme-for-facebookFebruary 15 marked the midway point for this year’s Pick. Click. Give. campaign – and yet Doyon Foundation was nowhere near the halfway point of our Pick. Click. Give. fundraising goal.

As of February 15, 28 donors had pledged $1,625 to Doyon Foundation, leaving a $3,375 gap between pledges and our $5,000 fundraising goal.

We are asking all Alaskans to consider helping us get to our $5,000 Pick. Click. Give. goal.

“Your Pick. Click. Give. donations go directly to support the Foundation’s general scholarship fund, which helps offset the high cost of tuition and books for both full-time and part-time college students,” says Doris Miller, executive director of Doyon Foundation.

Pick. Click. Give. donations are down significantly from last year, negatively impacting nonprofits statewide. Less than 5 percent of Alaskans are choosing to Pick. Click. Give. when they complete their PFD applications.

Last year, 70 donors contributed $5,375 to Doyon Foundation through Pick. Click. Give. This year, we just hope to reach the $5,000 mark.

“We know it is a tough year for a lot of Alaskans,” Doris acknowledges. “At the same time, we need to continue supporting the efforts of students who are going to school with the goal of getting an education and improving the quality of life for themselves, their families and their communities. Because in the end, that benefits us all.”

Alaskans are encouraged to Pick. Click. Give. to Doyon Foundation when completing their 2017 PFD application. The deadline to submit a 2017 PFD application is Friday, March 31.

Those who have already submitted a PFD application can easily add a Pick. Click. Give. contribution by logging back into their application at pfd.alaska.gov. Step-by-step instructions for making a Pick. Click. Give. donation are available here.

Donations of any amount are welcomed. “Every little bit moves us toward our goal,” Doris says.

 

Did you Pick. Click. Give. when you filled out your PFD application this year? If so, post this badge to your Facebook page or add it to your email to let everyone know you are supporting students and saving languages with Doyon Foundation!

If you haven’t yet made a Pick. Click. Give. pledge, please consider doing so today. Less than 5 percent of Alaskans are giving this year, and nonprofits across the state are feeling the decline (including Doyon Foundation). We need your help to reach our Pick. Click. Give. goal!

Already filed for your PFD? Don’t worry – it is easy to log back into your PFD application and add a Pick. Click. Give. donation. Need help? Check out these simple step-by-step instructions.

From all of us here at Doyon Foundation, thank you for your support!

noahNoah Lovell, born in Fairbanks, Alaska, is the son of Sallie and Patrick Lovell, and the grandson of Lillian J. Evans and Joseph W. Burns. He is currently enrolled as a freshman at the University of Alaska Fairbanks pursuing a degree in business administration with a minor in Japanese.

Since the age of 15, Noah has worked as a Native tour guide on the Riverboat Discovery, where he shares how Alaska Natives have lived for generations. Noah, who is Japanese and Alaska Native, says he has always had an interest in cultures, particularly his own. He has been able to experience both cultures, growing up in Alaska and traveling to Japan on a summer exchange in high school.

Noah also enjoys stories from his father about his youth and his grandmother about their indigenous heritage. “I love going to different cultural events, listening to elders sing and dance, as well as being active in the festivities myself,” he says. “Surrounding yourself in a community of strong people is the best thing for anyone, and I’m happy our Alaska Native community is as strong as it is.”

As a Doyon Foundation fall 2016 Competitive Committee Choice scholarship recipient, Noah says, “The Foundation has helped me financially to further my education and has been instrumental with connecting me with others in the community. It’s shown me that there are groups and organizations that can help Native students achieve their goals.”

Choosing a major has been one of the biggest challenges Noah has faced in college so far. “College catapults you into the workforce and picking the right major that suits you and your interests is very important,” he says, adding that he overcame this challenge by reviewing his options and personal strengths before picking a field that was right for him. “I chose business because it’s a strong field and allows people to understand the business side of the world around us as well as enabling me to possibly start my own business.”

Speaking to his fellow students, Noah says, “Realize that success is for everyone, and never forget where you came from. Wherever you go in life, always take with you a strong work ethic, dedication towards your goals, and a willingness to learn new things.”

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Help Doyon Foundation support students like Noah – Pick. Click. Give. to Doyon Foundation when you fill out your 2017 PFD application!

Aubrielle Champagne, of Tok, Alaska, is the daughter of Karla and Shawn Champagne, and the granddaughter of Ted Charles and Darlene Summar, and Ray and Linda Champagne.

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Help us support more students like Aubrielle. Pick. Click. Give. to Doyon Foundation!

The Doyon Foundation scholarship recipient has been playing hockey since she was 5 years old. Then, during her freshman year of high school, everything changed. Aubrielle was diagnosed with Chiari malformation, a condition in which brain tissue extends into your spinal canal. She underwent five brain surgeries, contracted meningitis – and almost died. When she recovered, her doctors told her she should never play hockey again.

Instead, Aubrielle worked hard toward gaining full mobility and getting back on the ice. She exceeded expectations and today is a goalie on the hockey team at the University of Wisconsin Superior (UWS), where she is working toward her bachelor’s degree in biology.

“I am working hard to fight the pain Chiari has brought me and I continue to get mentally and physically stronger. If it wasn’t for God’s miracles, I wouldn’t be alive today and I am thankful. Even though the pain never ends, I fight for the game I love,” she says, adding that giving up has never been an option, and that when she can no longer play she will coach. “Hockey has opened my mind to new possibilities and I am forever grateful.”

While school and hockey are central in Aubrielle’s life, she also finds time for other activities. In the summer, she volunteers for Hockey Ministries International to help coach their youth hockey players in Alaska. This past summer she was also a biology volunteer at Tetlin Wildlife Refuge. She also enjoys photography.

After everything she has experienced and overcome, Aubrielle says she has much to be grateful for, including Doyon Foundation’s support. “Doyon Foundation helped me achieve my dreams as a student athlete. Without Doyon Foundation, I wouldn’t be here,” she says. “I also would like to thank anyone who has helped me throughout the years, and my friends and family for showing me love and compassion and teaching me to never lose hope.”

Speaking from experience, Aubrielle now encourages others to have hope. “Believe in yourself and no matter what, don’t give up on your dreams,” she says.

pcg-logo-fb-profileHelp Doyon Foundation support students like Aubrielle – Pick. Click. Give. to Doyon Foundation when you fill out your 2017 PFD application!

 

Pick. Click. Give. When You Complete Your 2017 PFD Application

df-pcg-meme-for-facebookLast year, 29,543 Alaskans pledged $3.19 million in Pick. Click. Give. donations – including the 70 donors who contributed $5,375 to Doyon Foundation! If you’d like to support the Foundation’s work this year, please consider making a Pick. Click. Give. pledge when you complete your 2017 PFD application. The application period is open now through March 31.

We extend our heartfelt gratitude to our Pick. Click. Givers, whose contributions support our general scholarship fund. As student Joseph Bifelt says, “With your help, anything is possible!”

Last year’s Pick. Click. Give. pledges compare favorably to 2015, when 75 Alaskans gave $5,375 to the Foundation.

With the support of donors like these, we are able to provide scholarships and offer cultural opportunities to students who are pursuing their educational, career and life goals. During the 2015 – 2016 academic year, the Foundation awarded 578 scholarships totaling $684,633.

For more information on Doyon Foundation and opportunities to support students, please contact us at 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

Thank You to Our 2016 Pick. Click. Give. Donors!

Amber Allen

Barbara Beatus

Aaron Brees

Alana Brown

Patricia Brown

Xavier Brown

Cullen Carlo

Kimberly Carlo

Teyah Clark

Peter Demientieff

Tiana Demientieff

Stacey Demoski

Eta-Starr Edwardsen

Ralph Elook

Mavor Englishoe

Evelyn Esmailka

Diane Evans-Sommer

Bentley Foster

Collin Foster

Laura Fox

Monica Garcia

Eric Girard

Rania Girard

Carol Greenway

Allan Hayton

Sharon Hildebrand

Dewey Hoffman

Laverne Huntington

Cole Isaacson

Cruz Isaacson

Anthony Mallott

Jamie Marunde

Fredrick Matheson

Doris Miller

Craig Mishler

Calvin Moses

Paul Mountain

Sarah Obed

Susan Paskvan

Terri Paul-Smoke

Austyn Pedebone

Sunny Pedebone

Evon Peter

Melinda Peter

Mariah Pitka – Jenkins

Sonta Roach

Erin Rose

Mary Sam

Aaron Schutt

Breanna Semaken

Geraldine Simon

Natasha Singh

Caleb Smoke

Jesse Smoke

Larissa Sommer

Leann Sommer

Dena Sommer-Pedebone

Allen Todd

Ashley Wallace

 

Helena Marie Jacobs is the daughter of Dee Olin and David Hoffman, and the Helena Jacobsgranddaughter of the late Lillian and Fred Olin, the late Lorraine and John Honea, and the late Helen and George Hoffman. Born in Fairbanks, and with family roots in Ruby, Alaska, Helena now owns a consulting business in Anchorage, Alaska. She has spent over 10 years working to support leadership development, capacity building and the pursuit of higher education.

Helena received bachelor’s degrees in anthropology and Spanish from Willamette University, where she graduated cum laude, and with honors from the Spanish department. She then continued her education by receiving a master’s in public policy from UC Berkeley Goldman School of Public Policy.

Helena, who received both basic and competitive scholarships, says Doyon Foundation helped her financially throughout her academic career. “The Foundation offers financial support, and an invitation to join a community of supporters and cheerleaders. It is invested in promoting the well-being of our people through educational advancement and connection to culture and language,” she says.

During graduate school, Helena shares that she “wanted to quit every midterm period. So once about every two or three months, I would secretly work on an exit strategy to leave my school in California and move back home to Alaska.”

While she did end up taking a semester off, Helena returned to successfully finish her studies. “Looking back now, I’m so glad I didn’t allow myself to quit. Two years of homesickness feels like a drop in the bucket now compared to all the opportunity, open doors and relationships I have because of it,” she says.

Helena encourages other students who are struggling to plug into the community that the Foundation provides. “Reaching out and investing in just one extra relationship with someone who can help provide you perspective and support when you need it most can be one of the most valuable things to help you reach your goals,” she says.

Today, Helena stays busy running her business and raising five children ranging in age from 1 to 15 alongside her husband, Torin. She stays involved in her community as a RurAL CAP Alaska Native youth success resource basket advisory group member, and a hero donor for Blood Bank of Alaska.

She is also a part of the Doyon Foundation Alumni Association, and volunteers her time reviewing students’ scholarship essays before submission. Helena also serves on the Foundation’s board of directors, and supports the Foundation as a Nee Ts’ee Neeyh (We All Give or Help) donor.

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