Uncategorized


We are pleased to present our September 2019 Native words of the month in Holikachuk. Thank you to our speakers, Elizabeth Keating and Mary Deacon.

Windy = xidets’iyh

Xidets’iyh he’? = Is it windy?

 

Yoonedz xidets’iyh. = There’s a North wind coming down.

 

For more translations, view our Native word of the month archives on the Foundation website.

We also invite you to access free online language-learning lessons by signing up for Doyon Languages Online! We currently have lessons available for HolikachukDenaakk’eBenhti Kenaga’ and Gwich’in, as well as a special set of Hän lessons based on the work of the late Isaac Juneby. All interested learners may sign up and access the courses at no charge – sign up today!

123_PickClickGive_FinalPush_Promotion_FB-INA big thank you to everyone who made a Pick. Click. Give. pledge to support Doyon Foundation scholarships this year. Thanks to your generosity, we have surpassed the number of donors and total amount pledged from past year. We truly appreciate your support.

The 2019 amount pledged is enough to fund approximately:

  • 9 advanced college credit scholarships for high school students taking college-level courses
  • Nearly 5 basic scholarships for part-time students
  • 3 basic scholarships for full-time students
  • Or nearly 4 short-term vocational scholarships

If you would like to help increase these numbers even further, we welcome your support! You can add or change your Pick. Click. Give. pledge through Saturday, August 31. Simply log back in to your MyAlaska account on the PFD webpage to add or change a pledge.

From all of the Foundation staff, board members and students, we say: Ana Basi’! Dogidinh! Baasee’/Maasee’! Hąį’ęę! Mä̀hsi’! Xisigidasidhut! Tsín’ęę! Tsen’anh! Tsen’įį! Quyanaq! Thank you!

American Indian Services Scholarship

REQUIREMENTS

  • Enrolled or will enroll as a matriculated student in a university, college, junior college or technical school (incoming freshman accepted)
  • At least One-Quarter (1/4) enrolled member of a Federally Recognized Native American Tribe.
  • Undergraduate student with no more than 150 semester credits or 210 quarter credits. First bachelor’s degree only. Graduate studies NOT eligible.
  • Full-time or part-time status – excluding non-credit courses (minimum of 6 credits).
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25 must be established and maintained after the first semester/quarter of college.
  • Completed Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

SCHOLARSHIP DEADLINES *UNTIL NOVEMBER 2ND

*Each deadline is for the Term (semester, trimester or quarter) that starts in one of the months listed.

If Your Term Starts in Either: You Would Apply for Award #: Application and Required Documents are Due: Application Opens:
April, May or June      I  Feb 1st
July, August or September      II Jun 1st Feb 2nd
 October, November or December      III  Aug 1st June 2nd
 January, February or March      IV Nov 1st Aug 2nd

*IMPORTANT UPCOMING CHANGES*

  • Coming Soon! – there will be a new look to the online application. If you are having trouble with this, please let us know and we will walk you through it.
  • Starting November 2, 2019 – our deadline schedule will be updated/changed starting in 2020. Please make a note of this to avoid any misunderstanding and/or missing out on our scholarship. Click here for the new deadline schedule.

GUIDELINES

First-Time Applicants and Re-Applicants – fill out an online application each time and submit all required documents no later than the deadline (see list of required documents below). Students are only able to apply for the current award at a time. Incomplete applications will not be processed. Late documents and/or applications will not be accepted. *If the last time you were awarded was before 2016, you will need to resubmit your photo and proof of heritage.

AIS corresponds with students through emails. Be sure to add scholarship@americanindianservices.org to your contacts and safe senders list to avoid emails from AIS going to your SPAM folder. Check your email frequently.

Please allow 6 to 8 weeks AFTER the deadline for applications to be processed and updated online. With the large amount of documents and emails we receive, it will take us some time to update your online application. (Be advised that during the holiday season it will take us longer.) Please DO NOT call or email about the status of your application. If you are awarded, you will receive an Award Email and you will be required to write a thank you letter (details will be in the email), which needs to be submitted by the specified deadline. Scholarship checks will be sent to the school only after receipt of thank you letters. If no letter is received by the deadline, even after attempts to contact the student, the award will be canceled.

If you have questions about scholarships, please contact us at scholarship@americanindianservices.org

118_People Promotion_Cory_FB-IN

In honor of the 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, we’d like to introduce you to another of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Cory LePore is a student at the University of Hawaii Manoa where he’s pursuing a master of arts degree in economics. Originally from Bethel, Cory is the son of Cory LePore Sr. and Cindy LePore, both of Bethel. His maternal grandparents are Beverly Turner and Thaddeus Tikiun, both of Holy Cross.

Cory earned an undergraduate degree in economics from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) in 2018. He is a member of the International Economics Honor Society, which recognizes scholastic achievement.

Doyon Foundation: Congratulations as you look ahead to earning your master’s degree in 2020. What attracts you to economics?

Cory LePore: Our world has many economic challenges that we’re facing daily and the fact that there’s no one correct way to approach those problems is so fascinating. Studying economics provides me with skills to make an impact on those problems throughout my lifetime.

DF: Economics is famous for being a difficult field, one that requires good ability in math and statistics as well as an understanding of human behavior.

CL: My biggest challenge has been trying to find my proper way to study. I found myself trying to cram math material into my brain the night before an exam and I ended up doing subpar.

I was in my first year as undergraduate at UAF when I found a way to study that suited me. I realized I’d have to dedicate more time and effort. I tried breaking my study time into several days, usually starting a week before an exam, and then study a couple of hours a day. I saw a massive change for the better in my grades.

I found this approach by trying all sorts of study techniques. I tried studying in a group and using flash cards. I’d read and research different strategies online.

DF: Your advice to other students is to remember that teachers and advisers are there to help. How did you learn this lesson? Why do you think so many students overlook these sources of help?

CL: I think they’re afraid. Students tend to think that teachers are there to teach and that’s it. But in reality, most teachers love when you interact with them outside of class. It shows you’re willing to challenge yourself and that you really want to learn the topic.

DF: You’ll be interning at Alyeska Pipeline Service Company this summer.

CL: I’ve been at Alyeska the past three summers. The work involves spreadsheet modeling, demand and market analysis, profit maximization analysis, and assisting in contract negotiations.

Interning provides me with hands-on experience so I’ll be better prepared as soon as I enter the workforce.

DF: How did Doyon Foundation scholarships help you?

CL: I was able to just take my classes and focus on school. Doyon Foundation scholarships freed up so much of my time and stress by allowing me to not have to work full time while in school.

Thank you so much for your academic support of Alaska Native students. It’s very much appreciated!

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students earn college degrees. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. This year’s golf classic took place June 13 and 14 in Fairbanks.

A special thank you to all of our 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic sponsors, including our Doctorate-level sponsors: Associated Pipe Line Contractors, Inc., Doyon Family of Companies, and KeyBank and Key Equipment Finance. Your support makes scholarships for students like Cory possible! View all 2019 sponsors on our website.

To learn about future opportunities to support the event as a sponsor, golfer or volunteer, visit the Foundation website for details. 

The Indigenous Intern’s Guide to Washington, D.C. includes advice, a map of Native organizations, a listing of other D.C. Native intern programs, and information about free events throughout the summer.

The Guide is a resource for Native youth who come to Washington, D.C. for internships, conferences, or to meet with their elected officials. The Guide will be updated annually and provide the most recent ways to network and get involved while in D.C.

Click Here to Access the Intern Guide

111_DLO_Course Promotion_Denaakk’e_FB-INDenaakk’e course now available for free to all interested learners

Doyon Foundation today released the third course in its Doyon Languages Online project, which is creating introductory online lessons for nine of the 10 endangered Doyon region languages. The Denaakk’e course joins the previously released Benhti Kenaga’ and Gwich’in courses. All three courses are now available at no charge to all interested language learners through the Doyon Foundation website.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Denaakk’e, also called Tl’eeyegge Hʉkkenaage’ or Koyukon Athabascan language, originates from the areas surrounding the middle Yukon River, the Koyukuk River and the Lower Tanana Rivers in the central region of Alaska. Its traditional territory covers 78,000 square miles, approximately the size of the entire state of Minnesota.

“While our current population of over 3,000 people now live all across Alaska and the world, we estimate that there are 250 active Denaakk’e learners of all ages and races, striving to continue our arts, songs and practices in their schools and individual families. It is a living language that continues to change, evolve, grow and adapt, just like our communities,” said members of the Denaakk’e course content creation team.

Like the other Doyon Languages Online courses, the Denaakk’e course was developed by a team of content creators, Elders and a linguistics consultant, with the support of Foundation staff.

“The Denaakk’e content creation team relied on the expertise of the Denaakk’e language Elders and the materials they published from the 1970s to today,” said Allan Hayton, director of the Foundation’s language revitalization program. “The course has some wild turns in it, from how to talk with your baby to how to butcher a spruce hen you hit with your car on the way back from Minto. Special attention was paid to making these lessons relatable to today’s learners.”

The finished Denaakk’e course includes 10 units, each with five lessons of content, reviews and unit assessments, as well as 10 conversational videos with subtitles in English and Denaakk’e, and 25 culture and grammar notes. Supplemental resources include an extensive Denaakk’e (Koyukon) dictionary available for purchase through the Alaska Native Language Center, and additional free materials through the Alaska Native Language Archive. The Yukon Koyukuk School District currently hosts a Denaakk’e language program delivered via distance technologies to schools in rural Alaska.

The Foundation extends a special thank you to the Denaakk’e content creation team, including Elders Eliza Jones and Marie Yaska, and content creators Susan Paskvan, Dewey Kk’ołeyo Hoffman and Bev Kokrine; as well as Doyon, Limited; Paul Mountain; Denakkanaaga, Inc.; Yukon Koyukuk School District; Alaska Native Language Center and Alaska Native Language Archive; and the people who worked with the Denaakk’e language from the 1970s to today. Their work makes this course possible.

The declining number of speakers, and the desire to preserve and pass along the Native languages of the Doyon region to future generations is the driving force behind Doyon Foundation’s Doyon Languages Online project. The project is creating introductory online lessons for nine of the 10 endangered Doyon region languages: Holikachuk, Denaakk’e (Koyukon), Benhti Kenaga’ (Lower Tanana), Hän, Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in), Deg Xinag, Dinak’i (Upper Kuskokwim), Nee’anděg’ (Tanacross) and Née’aaneegn’ (Upper Tanana).

In the past week, Doyon Foundation officially launched Doyon Languages Online with the release of the Benhti Kenaga’ and Gwich’in courses. Earlier this spring, the Foundation gave a preview of Doyon Languages Online with the release of a special set of Hän language lessons based on the work of the late Isaac Juneby, an Alaska Native leader, respected Elder and language revitalization pioneer. The Foundation plans to release one additional course later this week.

The Doyon Languages Online launch coincides with the International Year of Indigenous Languages, which Doyon Foundation is a partner organization of.  In 2016, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages. At the time, it was estimated that 40 percent of the 6,700 languages spoken around the world were in danger of disappearing.

Doyon Languages Online is a partnership between Doyon Foundation and 7000 Languages, a nonprofit that supports endangered language learning through software donated by Transparent Language. It is funded by a three-year grant from the Administration for Native Americans (ANA), awarded in 2016, and an additional three-year grant from the Alaska Native Education Program (ANEP), awarded in 2017.

For more information on the Denaakk’e course and the Doyon Languages Online project, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com. For assistance signing up for or using Doyon Languages Online, view the instructional video series on YouTube.

ANA Language Revitalization Grant #: 90NL0626. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this publication, and all others associated with the Doyon Languages Online project, do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Administration for Children and Families, or the Administration for Native Americans.

 

 

111_DLO_Course Promotion_Gwich'in_FB-IN

Gwich’in course now available for free to all interested learners

Doyon Foundation released the second course in its Doyon Languages Online project today: Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa, or Gwich’in, one of the 10 endangered languages of the Doyon region. The Gwich’in course joins the previously released Benhti Kenaga’ course. Both online courses are now available at no charge to all interested language learners through the Doyon Foundation website.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Gwich’in is a Dene Athabascan language spoken in the northeastern Alaska villages of Fort Yukon (Gwichyaa Zhee), Arctic Village (Vashrąįį K’ǫǫ), Venetie (Vįįhtąįį), Chalkyitsik (Jałgiitsik), Circle (Danzhit Haiinląįį), Birch Creek (Deenduu), and Beaver (Tseeduu), as well as Old Crow (Vuntut) in the Yukon Territory and Fort McPherson (Teetł’it Zheh), Aklavik, Tsiigehtchic, and Inuvik in Northwest Territories. The Gwich’in population is about 3,000, and of that number about 250 in Alaska and 300 in Canada are speakers of the language.

The declining number of speakers, and the desire to preserve and pass along the Native languages of the Doyon region to future generations is the driving force behind Doyon Foundation’s Doyon Languages Online project. The project is creating introductory online lessons for nine of the 10 endangered Doyon region languages: Holikachuk, Denaakk’e (Koyukon), Benhti Kenaga’ (Lower Tanana), Hän, Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in), Deg Xinag, Dinak’i (Upper Kuskokwim), Nee’anděg’ (Tanacross) and Née’aaneegn’ (Upper Tanana). The Foundation plans to release two additional courses over the next month.

Earlier this month, Doyon Foundation officially launched Doyon Languages Online with the release of the Benhti Kenaga’ course. This spring, the Foundation gave a preview of Doyon Languages Online with the release of a special set of Hän language lessons based on the work of the late Isaac Juneby, an Alaska Native leader, respected Elder and language revitalization pioneer.

The Doyon Languages Online launch coincides with the International Year of Indigenous Languages, which Doyon Foundation is a partner organization of.  In 2016, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages. At the time, it was estimated that 40 percent of the 6,700 languages spoken around the world were in danger of disappearing.

“After years of dedicated efforts, we are so pleased to share this language revitalization work with all interested learners,” said Doris Miller, the Foundation’s executive director. “It is even more special to launch Doyon Languages Online in conjunction with the International Year of Indigenous Languages.”

Like the other Doyon Languages Online courses, the Gwich’in course was developed by a team of content creators, Elders and a linguistics consultant, with the support of Foundation staff. The Gwich’in content creation team was one of the first teams to be involved with Doyon Languages Online.

“As experienced teachers and curriculum developers, the members brought a lot of experience and knowledge into the design of their course. We would often talk about ‘How would a grandma talk to her grandson? And what would he say back?’ All of the members of this team are speakers, and each is passionate about documenting and passing on their culture and language,” said Allan Hayton, director of the Foundation’s language revitalization program.

The Foundation extends a special thank you to the Gwich’in content creation team, including Kenneth Frank, Caroline Tritt-Frank, John T. Ritter and Irene Roberts; as well as Doyon, Limited; the Yukon Native Language Center; the Alaska Native Language Center and Alaska Native Language Archive; Hishinlai’ Peter; and the people who worked with the Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa language from the 1970s to today. Their work makes this course possible.

The finished Gwich’in course includes 10 units, each with five lessons of content, reviews and unit assessments, as well as nine conversational videos with subtitles in English and Gwich’in, and 22 culture and grammar notes.

Students interested in supplementing their learning resources are encouraged to consider the college-level beginning Athabascan – Gwich’in course taught by Hishinlai’ Peter at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. There are also a number of reading materials, such as stories and a junior dictionary, published by the Alaska Native Language Center or available in the Alaska Native Language Archive.

Doyon Languages Online is a partnership between Doyon Foundation and 7000 Languages, a nonprofit that supports endangered language learning through software donated by Transparent Language. It is funded by a three-year grant from the Administration for Native Americans (ANA), awarded in 2016, and an additional three-year grant from the Alaska Native Education Program (ANEP), awarded in 2017.

For more information on the Gwich’in course and the Doyon Languages Online project, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com. For assistance signing up for or using Doyon Languages Online, view the instructional video series on YouTube.

ANA Language Revitalization Grant #: 90NL0626. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this publication, and all others associated with the Doyon Languages Online project, do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Administration for Children and Families, or the Administration for Native Americans.

Next Page »