A Doyon Foundation scholarship recipient who graduated from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 2016, Raymond Kangas is the son of Irene and Gary Kangas of Fairbanks. His paternal grandparents are Nora and Al Kangas of Ruby; his maternal grandparents are Martha and Franklin Dayton of Koyukuk.

Raymond KangasWhen Raymond Kangas looks back on his college years, he has a hard time counting up all the people who helped him get where he is today. A mechanical engineer since 2016 with Anchorage-based Doyon Anvil, Raymond received Doyon Foundation scholarships while earning his bachelor’s degree from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Classes in fluid mechanics and arctic engineering were key – along with a work ethic instilled in him since childhood and fish camp days with his family on the Yukon River.

“My family gave me stability, with my parents being the anchors,” he says. Inspiring professors and study group friends helped. And he says, “Thanks to the Doyon Foundation scholarship program, (Doyon, Limited) annual dividends, and overall encouragement to see shareholders progress, the Doyon family certainly has played a role in seeing Athabascans succeed in competitive occupations.

Raymond, 24, is one of numerous classroom-to-career professionals who benefit from Doyon Foundation college scholarships before going on to employment with Doyon, Limited companies. It’s a trend that advances Doyon’s core values because in addition to knowledge, skills and talent, shareholders apply traditional values as they collaborate with clients worldwide.

“Creating a means for shareholders to potentially work for Doyon improves their economic well-being,” says Terry Caetano, president and general manager of Doyon Anvil. “It’s also a key part of the mission on which the company was founded.”

With offices in California, Montana and Washington state, Doyon Anvil is a multi-discipline engineering and design firm offering process safety/risk management; project management; and construction coordination support services. Doyon Anvil projects include upstream oil production, including North Slope expertise; pipeline and terminal work throughout Alaska, the Rocky Mountain region and Pacific Northwest; and power generation in Alaska, Canada and the Pacific Northwest.

Terry says that in addition to seeking out smart, motivated people, what he values in new hires is a desire to solve complex problems and keep learning. “That’s what I saw in Raymond,” Terry says.

Doyon Anvil is Raymond’s first engineering job out of college, and among things he enjoys is the chance to work on a variety projects requiring different skills. For instance, a typical workday may involve a facility where new piping is needed; Raymond’s role includes working with piping designers to prepare a complete work package – from checking compliance with specifications and reviewing drawings to putting together a material requisition to purchase components. If needed, he also completes a stress analysis on the design.

Raymond advises college students seeking to join professional ranks at Doyon subsidiaries to stay focused in the early stages of their education.

“Being awarded scholarships and getting selected for a job position are some of the things that are out of your control,” he says. “What you can control is the effort you put into your education. The first step in any career is being qualified.”

Are you a former Doyon Foundation scholarship recipient working today in the Doyon, Limited Family of Companies? We’d like to feature your story! Please send email to foundation@doyon.com and we’ll be in touch. Thanks!