Doyon Foundation is seeking candidates for one open seat on our competitive scholarship review committee. Doyon, Limited shareholders age 18+ who live in a rural village within the Doyon region are eligible to serve. The deadline to apply is Friday, April 27. 

Individuals interested in giving back and helping students achieve their full potential are encouraged to consider serving on this important committee, which reviews, evaluates and scores student competitive scholarship applications.

Interested candidates should submit a résumé and a letter of interest outlining why they’d like to serve to Doris Miller, executive director, via email at millerd@doyon.com by Friday, April 27, 2018. The Foundation board of directors will select the new committee member at their next regularly scheduled meeting in Fairbanks.

To qualify for this position, candidates must:

  • Be a Doyon shareholder.
  • Be age 18 or older.
  • Live in a rural village within the Doyon region.
  • Value and support higher education.
  • Be committed to serve a three-year term.
  • Have an internet-accessible computer with recent version of web browser installed (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera).

Please note that per IRS regulations, committee members cannot be employees of the Doyon Family of Companies or Doyon Foundation.

Responsibilities of committee members include:

  • Attending an orientation in May/June in Fairbanks, either in person or via teleconference.
  • Spending 30 – 40 hours reviewing, evaluating and scoring all competitive scholarship applications online via the Doyon Foundation website.
  • Attending a one-day meeting in Fairbanks in June/July to award the scholarships.
  • Meeting with Doyon Foundation administration to review and recommend competitive scholarship policy changes.

Please note that service on the scholarship review committee is on a voluntary basis.

For more information, please contact Doyon Foundation at 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

“When I’m learning my language, I feel like I’m finding myself and understanding who I am.”

 

Diloola Erickson’s parents are Susan Erickson from Kaltag and Arne Erickson from Tok. Her maternal grandparents are the late Irene and Alexander Solomon, Jr., of Kaltag. Her paternal grandparents are Joyce Erickson and the late John Erickson of Tok. Diloola’s language is Denaakk’e (Koyukon).

Diloola edited

Born in Sitka, Diloola Erickson was raised in the Tlingit village of Hoonah in Southeast Alaska, where her favorite part of school was Tlingit class. And though she loved learning Tlingit, she remembers feeling that something was missing.

“I grew up so far from my culture that I always felt distant from it – I always had a longing to know more,” she says.

To help ensure that her 3-year-old daughter, Tsee’ołyeets, is immersed in her language and culture from an early age, Diloola is focused on becoming fluent in Denaakk’e, the language of the Athabascan people of the central Koyukuk and Yukon rivers.

Along with Dewey Hoffman, who works with language revitalization in Fairbanks, and University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) language instructor Lorraine David, Diloola co-hosts a weekly language-learning group at her home and has enrolled her daughter in a language-learning classroom at Fairbanks Native Association. She practices Denaakk’e with her daughter daily, using a Denaakk’e weather wheel and family name chart. “I want to pass on my language and culture so that she’ll always know who she is and where she comes from,” Diloola says.

A Doyon, Limited shareholder, Diloola’s commitment to Denaakk’e fluency deepened when she attended the Alaska Native Studies conference in 2017. It was at an intensive workshop facilitated by Dewey Hoffman that Diloola met Lorraine David, a fluent Denaakk’e speaker who inspired Diloola to start her language journey. Lorraine is a former Doyon Foundation board member and veteran language instructor at UAF.

“I was craving more sessions like that,” Diloola says, and Lorraine agreed to meet with Diloola and her group weekly. She often records their sessions and tries to listen daily to gain vocabulary and pronunciation.

“Lorraine is passionate about passing on our language. She has been one of the biggest supporters in my journey,” Diloola says.

A UAF student graduating in May with a bachelor’s degree in rural development and a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering, Diloola plans to pursue work in positions that will allow her to help raise up Alaska Native people. She sees language revitalization as part of the efforts to create positive change in Alaska Native communities. DErickson

As a First Alaskans Institute summer intern at Doyon Foundation in 2017, Diloola contributed to the Doyon Languages Online team by developing multimedia materials promoting language revitalization in the Doyon region. The team’s favorites include stickers featuring beaded gloves conveying everyday phrases in Denaakk’e, like “Enee!” (“good!”). Familiar to any conference-goer, “Hello, my name is …” adhesive name tags were created by Diloola in each of the Doyon region languages. Name tags were available at school fairs throughout Anchorage and Fairbanks.

edzooDiloola also helped lead a workshop at the 2017 First Alaskans Institute Elders & Youth Conference, “Taking Language Revitalization Online – Using GIFs to Get the Word Out.” Participants developed their own GIFs – a format that animates images to easily share them online – and brainstormed other forms of social media aimed at encouraging people to take join in language revitalization.

“Ultimately my goal is to use my education to uplift my culture and the Alaska Native community,” Diloola says. “Learning my language is the biggest part of learning who I am.”

As Doyon Foundation continues to grow our language revitalization efforts in the Doyon region, we are noticing a group of people who are committed and dedicating their own time to learning and perpetuating their ancestral language. We are pleased to share some of these “Language Champion” profiles with you. If you know a language champion, please nominate him or her by contacting our language program director at haytona@doyon.com. Language champions may also complete our profile questionnaire here. You may learn more about our language revitalization program on our website.

Make your pledge by March 31 PFD deadline

DF_18_Pick.Click.Give. Reminder Promotion_blog

Let’s work together to give students a head start on making their dreams a reality by Pick. Click. Giving. to support Doyon Foundation’s scholarship program! You can make your pledge online at www.pfd.alaska.gov.

As of February 1, a total of 22 donors had pledged $1,550 to the Foundation. At the end of last year’s Pick. Click. Give. campaign, 57 donors contributed $3,975 to support Foundation scholarships. As you can see, we have a ways to go, so we need your help!

If you’ve already pledged, THANK YOU! You can still help by spreading the word – send an email, tell a friend, or share this post on social media.

If you’re thinking about making a Pick. Click. Give. pledge, please consider making one before the PFD application deadline on March 31.

Already applied for your PFD? Not a problem. Simply log back into www.pfd.alaska.gov and it’s easy to add a Pick. Click. Give. pledge.

Want to learn more about the Foundation and our scholarships? Visit us at www.doyonfoundation.com!

Fill our our grad info form by April 25

DF_20_2018Grads Promotion_blog

Did you graduate this year? Or are you expecting to graduate in academic year 2017 – 18? Doyon Foundation wants to hear from you!

We are asking all Doyon Foundation students who are graduating during the 2017 – 18 school year to complete a short graduate information request form by Wednesday, April 25.

We’ll feature the information you share in our popular annual graduate yearbook! Check out the 2017 graduate yearbook on our website.  

This is our opportunity to celebrate all of your hard work and accomplishments! So please take a few moments now to fill out our graduate questionnaire.

Not graduating but know someone who is? Be sure to pass along this info to them! Thank you!

MarHere is your March Native Word of the Month in Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in)! Hai’ (thank you) to our translator, Allan Hayton.

March = Ch’izhin Zhrii

K’eegiidal = They arrived

Tanan hee dinjii leii naii k’eegiidal. = Many people have arrived in Fairbanks.

Listen to an audio recording of the translation: 

 

This Thursday and Friday, March 1 and 2, 11 a.m.

DF_17_GrantApplicationDeadline Promotion_blogPlanning to submit a proposal for an Our Language grant? Want some tips for developing your proposal? Have questions about the application or granting process? Need to brainstorm ideas for your project?

If so, then join Doyon Foundation for an Our Language grant teleconference this Thursday and Friday, March 1 and 2, at 11 a.m.! To participate, simply call 1.800.315.6338 and use the PIN 556677.

Not able to attend the teleconference? You’re welcome to call anytime with questions – contact Allan Hayton, language revitalization program director at 907.459.2162 or haytona@doyon.com.

Through the Our Language grant program, the Foundation will award grants of up to $8,000 to fund language revitalization projects. Doyon region tribal governments/tribal councils/communities; nonprofit Alaska Native organizations, societies and community groups; and Alaska Native cultural, educational and recreational organizations/centers are eligible to apply.

Our Language grant proposals are due no later than Monday, March 5, 2018, at 5 p.m. Learn more on our blog or access the application packet here.

 

FebHere is your February Native Word of the Month in Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in)! Hai’ (thank you) to our translator, Allan Hayton.

February = Veegwaadhat

Shidrii = My heart

Shidrii zhit gwiintł’oo shoo ihłii. = My heart is very happy.

Listen to an audio recording of the translation: