Doyon, Limited President and CEO Aaron Schutt (left) and Tanana Chiefs Conference Chief Chairman PJ Simon (right) present a $100,000 check to Doyon Foundation Executive Director Tiffany Simmons (middle) for the Foundation’s Health Scholarship Fund.

Doyon Foundation is pleased to announce a $100,000 donation award from Tanana Chiefs Conference (TCC). 

“We at TCC value and understand the importance of investing in our future generations,” said TCC Chief Chairman PJ Simon. “We hope that this funding provides the chance for youth who want to pursue their career in the health field to do so.” 

The award from TCC is matched by a financial commitment from Doyon, Limited to dedicate $200,000 to the Foundation’s Health Scholarship Fund. “We have seen the significant value and need for health care professionals in our communities,” said Aaron Schutt, President and CEO of Doyon, Limited. “We are honored to be able to contribute to students’ success.” 

TCC and Doyon, Limited are joining forces to support and encourage shareholder students in the health field through the establishment of the Health Scholarship Fund at Doyon Foundation. With the expansion of TCC’s Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center set to open next year, and with the COVID-19 pandemic highlighting the need for an increase in the healthcare workforce, both organizations agree that supporting Alaska Native students in pursuing healthcare careers is a priority. 

“For years, we have seen the need in the health field growing and as we look forward, that need will continue to increase,” said Doyon Foundation Executive Director, Tiffany Simmons. “The funding will not only support shareholder students financially, it will encourage students to continue their education.” 

The additional funding allowed Doyon Foundation to award eight additional health competitive scholarships to students for the fall 2021 semester. 

For more information on Doyon Foundation and its scholarship programs, including the new Health Scholarship Fund, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com

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RSVP today to join us May 22

The Doyon Foundation graduate reception is going virtual this year! While we will miss coming together in person in Fairbanks, we are excited for the opportunity to include students and supporters from across the country in a way we’ve never done before.

Whether you are a graduate, student, alumni, family, friend, teacher or other supporter, please mark your calendar and plan to join us:

Doyon Foundation 2020 Graduate Reception

Friday, May 22

2 p.m. AKST

Via ZOOM

RSVP to milkp@doyon.com by Wednesday, May 20 at 5 p.m. to receive the ZOOM link to join us

Our agenda includes a welcome from our executive director, Doris Miller; Doyon, Limited’s president and CEO, Aaron Schutt; and our board president, Jennifer Fate.

Plus, we’ll hear from our 2020 graduate speaker, Bruce Ervin, who graduated from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) with his bachelor’s degree in Alaska Native studies, and our alumni speaker (and board member!) Matthew Calhoun, who received his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) in 2002, his master’s in civil engineering from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2010, and a doctorate of philosophy in civil engineering from UAF in 2015. Calhoun is currently a tenure-track assistant professor of civil engineering at UAA.

Then, all of our 2020 grads in attendance will have the opportunity to introduce themselves live from wherever they are!

If you are graduating this year, please be sure to complete our 2020 graduate information form in advance of the event so we can include you in the graduate reception presentation.

A special thank you to Doyon, Limited’s communications and IT teams for helping us arrange this very special, first-of-its-kind Foundation event. We hope you can join us to celebrate the Class of 2020!

 

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The Doyon Foundation 2019 Graduate Reception takes place this Friday, May 10, at the Doyon, Limited Chiefs Court in Fairbanks. We are so excited to announce our confirmed full speaker line-up:

  • Alumni speakers: Brothers Aaron and Ethan Schutt
  • Elder speaker: Rev. Anna Frank, who received an honorary doctorate from the University of Alaska Fairbanks
  • Graduate speaker: Janessa Newman, 2019 University of Alaska Fairbanks graduate, bachelor’s of biological sciences

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In addition to these inspiring speakers, we will also hear introductions from our 2019 graduates and enjoy a performance by the talented Troth Yeddha’ dance group!

High school and college students who are graduating or have graduated during the 2018 – 2019 academic year are invited to attend, along with their friends, families, teachers and other Foundation supporters. Graduates are encouraged to wear their Native regalia, if they have it.

If you plan to attend, please RSVP with your name and the number of people attending to foundation@doyon.com or 907.459.2048.

Foundation to Award $64,000 to Nine Organizations 

 

Doyon Foundation has selected nine organizations to receive Our Language grants totaling $64,000 this year. Recipients include:

  • Alaska Native Heritage Center (ANHC) – Indigenous Language Institute Annual Symposium in October 2018. With this grant support, ANHC will send its language project director and two language project instructors to the annual symposium, allowing project staff to learn directly from organizations and individuals running language revitalization programs across the U.S.

 

  • KRFF – Athabascan Fiddlers Association, Inc. (AFA) Word of the Day and Phrase of the Day Language Project through December 2018. AFA plans to edit KRFF 89.1 FM’s existing “Word of the Day” and “Phrase of the Day” electronic files and broadcast them out to KRFF’s listening audience in the interior of Alaska and beyond.

 

  • Native Village of Eagle – Revitalization of Hän Language Project through fall 2019. Through this project, the village will provide a forum for fluent Hän Hwëch’in speakers to become teachers. By the end of summer 2018, the goal is to have at least two fluent speakers living in the village providing language lessons to others in the community. By the end of the year, the project seeks to have audio lessons available to those outside the village.

 

  • Native Village of Fort Yukon – Youth and Cultural Language Program through October 2018. Community youth have their own council and have planned year-round cultural activities, which will have Gwich’in language immersed throughout. CDs will also be produced for local radio and presentations on the language skills and cultural knowledge learned through the activities.

 

  • Native Village of Tetlin – Enhancing Culture Camp with Language Sessions in June 2018. During the culture camp, participants will be exposed to language materials and learn basic Nee’aanèegn’ (Upper Tanana) Tetlin dialect expressions.

 

  • Nikolai Village – Nikolai Culture/Language Camp in August 2018. In partnership with the Iditarod Area School District – Top of the Kuskokwim School and Telida Village Council, Nikolai Village will offer a culture and language camp with a focus on preserving the Upper Kuskokwim language and igniting a spark in the younger generation.

 

  • Tanacross – Language and Culture Classes through September 2018. The effort will include recording culture and language, offering regular culture and language meetings, and documenting Native culture, including stories and language, with an overall goal of having youth speak the language.

 

  • Tanana Tribal Council – Tanana Cooperative Community Language Preservation and Revitalization Project through September 2018. This project will continue and expand work started in 2017 by creating video recordings of Elders, developing and piloting lesson plans, encouraging multi-generational learning, and building on previous Where Are Your Keys workshops.

 

  • Yukon Flats School District – Honoring the Past, Building for the Future Through Gwich’in Language through September 2018. In collaboration with the Council of Athabascan Tribal Government, the project will promote language revitalization through professional development of current Gwich’in language and culture teachers.

The goal of the Our Language grant program is to support efforts to revitalize the endangered languages of the Doyon region, which include Nee’aanèegn’ (Upper Tanana), Dihthaad Xt’een Iin Aanděeg’ (Tanacross), Hän, Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in), Dinak’i (Upper Kuskokwim), Denaakk’e (Koyukon), Deg Xinag, Benhti Kokhut’ana Kenaga (Lower Tanana), Holikachuk, and Inupiaq.

Doyon, Limited originally established the language grant program in 2012. The Foundation’s language revitalization program now administers the grants, which are available to Doyon region tribal governments/tribal councils/communities; nonprofit Alaska Native organizations, societies and community groups; and Alaska Native cultural, educational and recreational organizations/centers.

For more information, visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

 

We had such a great time at the Doyon, Limited annual meeting this year. It was wonderful to meet and visit with so many of you who stopped by our table, and we appreciated the opportunity to present to you during the annual meeting. We took lots of photos – check them out on Facebook and be sure to tag yourself!

During our presentation, our executive director, Doris Miller, and language revitalization program director, Allan Hayton, shared about the two primary focus areas here at the Foundation – scholarships and language revitalization.

We were excited to announce that we distributed almost $1 million dollars in scholarships last year alone! And so far this year, we have awarded nearly 300 scholarships totaling more than $377,000.

We also reminded everyone planning to attend school this fall to mark their calendar for our fall scholarship application deadline coming up on May 15. This is the deadline to apply for competitive scholarships for the 2018 – 2019 academic year and basic scholarships for the fall semester. Applicants will apply using our brand new online scholarship application system, which offers a more streamlined, user-friendly experience for both our students and staff.

A reminder that our scholarships are not just for students pursuing traditional four-year degrees at a college or university. Funding is also available for Doyon shareholders who want to pursue vocational training. Vocational students are eligible for basic and competitive scholarships, as well as our short-term vocational scholarship, which pays the cost of the course or training, up to $1,000.

We also highlighted two brand new scholarships at the Foundation … the Marissa Flannery and Aaron Schutt Legal Scholarship Fund, and the Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr. Leadership Fund. Doyon President and CEO Aaron Schutt and his wife, Marissa Flannery, partnered with Doyon, Limited last year to establish the endowment for a new competitive scholarship for aspiring young lawyers. Jennifer Fate, a member of the Foundation board of directors, established the Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr. Leadership Fund to honor her parents’ accomplishments for the betterment of the Doyon people.

Since so many shareholders gather at the annual meeting, we took the opportunity to invite our alumni – which includes any previous Foundation scholarship recipients – to connect with us. We’d love to hear where you are and what you are doing, and continue to stay in touch with you. Foundation alumni can contact us at 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

Allan then shared about all the exciting activities taking place in the area of language revitalization, including Doyon Languages Online, which is an online language-learning platform for Doyon region languages. We are currently working on creating lessons for nine of the 10 Doyon region languages. Access to the lessons will be free and available to all interested learners.

Interested language learners can soon get a preview of Doyon Languages Online, as we are getting ready to launch a series of Hän language lessons by the late Isaac Juneby. Keep an eye on our website, blog, email and Facebook for updates on these lessons.

Allan reminded interested organizations to get their applications in for the Our Language grants, which provide funding to communities or organizations that wish to undertake a project to revitalize their Native language. Last year, eight proposals were funded up to $5,000. This year, we will award grants of up to $8,000. The deadline to submit a proposal was March 26, and we will be announcing this year’s recipients early this summer.

With a program growing as quickly as the language revitalization program, it is important to have a plan for the future. Allan updated everyone at the annual meeting on a recent strategic planning session that explored developing long-term strategies, identifying concrete steps for language revitalization, and inspiring new grassroots efforts for our region.

Doris closed the presentation with “thank yous” in each of the Doyon region languages, showing appreciation to our many supporters, including Doyon, Limited, the Foundation staff, board and volunteers, Nee Ts’ee Neyh and Pick. Click. Give. donors, Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic golfers and sponsors, and all of our language teachers, learners and supporters.

In addition to our presentation, we staffed a table at the annual meeting, where we had a video showing Doyon Languages Online activities, a language-learning demonstration, a language map, and nametags that read “Hello, my name is …” in each of the Doyon region languages.

Thank you to everyone who stopped by! We look forward to seeing you all again next year, and hope you will stay in touch with us throughout the year by:

Visiting our website

Subscribing to our blog

Signing up to receive emails

Following us on Facebook

February 8 is new deadline to apply

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Doyon Foundation has extended the application deadline for the new Doyon Languages Online II project manager position. Thursday, February 8 at 5 p.m. AKST is the new deadline for interested applicants to submit an application.

The position is currently posted on the Doyon, Limited website, and interested applicants are encouraged to review the job description, which includes the duties and responsibilities, and applicant qualifications. Those interested in the position may also apply online through the Doyon website.

The Doyon Languages Online II project manager will play an integral role in working to increase the number of people who speak the Doyon region languages of Nee’anděg’ (Tanacross), Née’aaneegn’ (Upper Tanana), Deg Xinag and Denak’i (Upper Kuskokwim).

The Foundation received a three-year, $977,423 grant from the U.S. Department of Education – Alaska Native Educational Program for the project, which will create more than 220 online language-learning lessons, train teachers in the use of the technology, and field test the lessons with students.

This project builds on the progress of the existing Doyon Languages Online project, which is already in the process of developing online language-learning lessons for five of the Doyon region languages: Holikachuk, Denaakk’e (Koyukon), Benhti Kenaga’ (Lower Tanana), Hän, and Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in).

The project manager will be responsible for the coordination, implementation and the evaluation of the Doyon Languages Online II project, and will work directly under the Foundation’s language revitalization program director. It is preferred that candidates have a master’s degree in the education field with experience in language teaching, curriculum development or evaluation, and past experience in program design, education planning, and teaching language.

To view the job description and to apply, visit the Doyon, Limited website. For more information on the Foundation’s language revitalization program, visit www.doyonfoundation.com.

 

Candidates sought for Doyon Languages Online II Project Manager

DF_15_Job Post Promotion_BlogDoyon Foundation is seeking a project manager for its Doyon Languages Online II project, which will work to increase the number of people who speak the Doyon region languages of Nee’anděg’ (Tanacross), Née’aaneegn’ (Upper Tanana), Deg Xinag and Denak’i (Upper Kuskokwim). Applications will be accepted until Wednesday, January 17.

The position is currently posted on the Doyon, Limited website, and interested applicants are encouraged to review the job description, which includes the duties and responsibilities, and applicant qualifications. Those interested in the position may also apply online through the Doyon website.

The Foundation received a three-year, $977,423 grant from the U.S. Department of Education – Alaska Native Educational Program for the project, which will create more than 220 online language-learning lessons, train teachers in the use of the technology, and field test the lessons with students.

This project builds on the progress of the existing Doyon Languages Online project, which is already in the process of developing online language-learning lessons for five of the Doyon region languages: Holikachuk, Denaakk’e (Koyukon), Benhti Kenaga’ (Lower Tanana), Hän, and Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in).

The project manager will be responsible for the coordination, implementation and the evaluation of the Doyon Languages Online II project, and will work directly under the Foundation’s language revitalization program director. It is preferred that candidates have a master’s degree in the education field with experience in language teaching, curriculum development or evaluation, and past experience in program design, education planning, and teaching language.

To view the job description and to apply, visit the Doyon, Limited website. For more information on the Foundation’s language revitalization program, visit www.doyonfoundation.com.

 

A Doyon Foundation scholarship recipient who graduated from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 2016, Raymond Kangas is the son of Irene and Gary Kangas of Fairbanks. His paternal grandparents are Nora and Al Kangas of Ruby; his maternal grandparents are Martha and Franklin Dayton of Koyukuk.

Raymond KangasWhen Raymond Kangas looks back on his college years, he has a hard time counting up all the people who helped him get where he is today. A mechanical engineer since 2016 with Anchorage-based Doyon Anvil, Raymond received Doyon Foundation scholarships while earning his bachelor’s degree from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Classes in fluid mechanics and arctic engineering were key – along with a work ethic instilled in him since childhood and fish camp days with his family on the Yukon River.

“My family gave me stability, with my parents being the anchors,” he says. Inspiring professors and study group friends helped. And he says, “Thanks to the Doyon Foundation scholarship program, (Doyon, Limited) annual dividends, and overall encouragement to see shareholders progress, the Doyon family certainly has played a role in seeing Athabascans succeed in competitive occupations.

Raymond, 24, is one of numerous classroom-to-career professionals who benefit from Doyon Foundation college scholarships before going on to employment with Doyon, Limited companies. It’s a trend that advances Doyon’s core values because in addition to knowledge, skills and talent, shareholders apply traditional values as they collaborate with clients worldwide.

“Creating a means for shareholders to potentially work for Doyon improves their economic well-being,” says Terry Caetano, president and general manager of Doyon Anvil. “It’s also a key part of the mission on which the company was founded.”

With offices in California, Montana and Washington state, Doyon Anvil is a multi-discipline engineering and design firm offering process safety/risk management; project management; and construction coordination support services. Doyon Anvil projects include upstream oil production, including North Slope expertise; pipeline and terminal work throughout Alaska, the Rocky Mountain region and Pacific Northwest; and power generation in Alaska, Canada and the Pacific Northwest.

Terry says that in addition to seeking out smart, motivated people, what he values in new hires is a desire to solve complex problems and keep learning. “That’s what I saw in Raymond,” Terry says.

Doyon Anvil is Raymond’s first engineering job out of college, and among things he enjoys is the chance to work on a variety projects requiring different skills. For instance, a typical workday may involve a facility where new piping is needed; Raymond’s role includes working with piping designers to prepare a complete work package – from checking compliance with specifications and reviewing drawings to putting together a material requisition to purchase components. If needed, he also completes a stress analysis on the design.

Raymond advises college students seeking to join professional ranks at Doyon subsidiaries to stay focused in the early stages of their education.

“Being awarded scholarships and getting selected for a job position are some of the things that are out of your control,” he says. “What you can control is the effort you put into your education. The first step in any career is being qualified.”

Are you a former Doyon Foundation scholarship recipient working today in the Doyon, Limited Family of Companies? We’d like to feature your story! Please send email to foundation@doyon.com and we’ll be in touch. Thanks!

Doyon Foundation is pleased to announce a new scholarship fund, the Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr. Leadership Fund, established by their daughter, Jennifer Fate. Jennifer, a member of both the Doyon, Limited and Doyon Foundation boards, created the fund to honor Mary Jane and Hugh’s accomplishments for the betterment of the Doyon people.

IMG_2992-001“There are many kinds of leadership. There’s community leadership, business leadership, educational leadership and the kind of leadership that stands up and says difficult truths out loud,” Jennifer said. “This fund is in honor of my parents, Mary Jane and Bud Fate. In their 65-year love story, they lived all of these types of leadership.”

“This fund celebrates those who strive to make our community a better place and our people, a stronger and healthier people,” Jennifer added. “It’s a fund that also recognizes the importance of those who bring leadership to healing past traumas, stopping current abuses and reshaping lives.”

Mary Jane’s life has been a positive example of leadership and involvement in her Alaska Native community. Overcoming adversity at a young age, Mary Jane understood the significance of cultural support and community involvement. Through practicing her Athabascan subsistence traditions, through embracing leadership, and with the resilient support of her husband, Hugh, Mary Jane became one of the most inspirational and motivating Alaska Native leaders of her generation.

Both Mary Jane and Hugh dedicated their lives to the betterment of the Alaska Native and Doyon region people. They were co-founders of the Fairbanks Native Association, mentored many Alaska Natives and Doyon region peoples, and provided dental health services throughout rural interior villages, traveling by small plane to villages where no dental services existed. Mary Jane served as the first female co-chair of the Alaska Federation of Natives, president of Baan O Yeel Kon Village Corporation, and on numerous other boards and commissions.

“We are grateful for the example set by Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr., and we are grateful for Jennifer’s generosity in establishing this scholarship, which will make it possible for future Alaska Native leaders to get the education they need to carry the torch forward into the next generation,” said Doris Miller, Doyon Foundation executive director.

Doyon shareholders studying health care, mental health care, business or any profession that contributes to the greater Alaska Native business, cultural or social community will be eligible for the new scholarship. Funds may be used for college, graduate school, post-secondary education, vocational or certificate programs. Preference will be given to students overcoming adversity or intending to enter a profession that contributes to the social or economic well-being of the Alaska Native community.

The first scholarship from the fund will be a basic scholarship awarded in spring 2018. The deadline for the spring 2018 scholarships has passed. A competitive scholarship will also be awarded in academic year 2018 – 2019. The next competitive scholarship application deadline is Tuesday, May 15, 2018, for scholarships for the 2018 – 2019 academic year.

“Please encourage Doyon shareholders working on a degree or vocation in business, education, mental health and health, substance abuse counseling, or spiritual and cultural training to apply for this scholarship. And thank you to the many leaders out there. Anaa Basee’,” Jennifer said.

Contributions from other donors to the Mary Jane and Hugh Fate, Jr. Leadership Fund are welcome. Secure online donations may be made on the Foundation website; be sure to note “Fate leadership scholarship” in the “special instructions” box. Donations may also be made by mailing a check to Doyon Foundation at 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. Please note “Fate leadership scholarship” in the memo line.

For more information about Doyon Foundation, scholarship eligibility and application instructions, or opportunities to support students, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

A new competitive scholarship for “aspiring young lawyers” will be available through Doyon Foundation starting in fall 2018. Doyon, Limited President and CEO Aaron Schutt and his wife, Marissa Flannery, announced the establishment of an endowment for the new scholarship during the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic reception in June. Watch a video of the announcement.

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Both graduates of Stanford Law School, the couple partnered with the Doyon, Limited board to help establish the fund, and have made a five-year commitment to getting the scholarship in place. Schutt presented the first check, in the amount of $10,000, to Doyon Foundation Executive Director Doris Miller at the reception.

“Did you know there is not a single Alaska Native judge in our entire court system? And I’m not sure there ever has been,” Schutt told the audience at the reception. “In our Native community, there is a great need for more Native lawyers, so I am proud to work with the Doyon board on this.”

“I know very well the cost and benefits a legal degree can have for Native students,” said Flannery, who shared that she and her husband each graduated with more than $100,000 in student loan debts. “We’ve never regretted our choice, and we hope that other students will make that choice.”

“We believe our degrees have benefited our communities tremendously,” continued Flannery, a partner at Sonosky and Chambers, a law firm devoted to representing Native American interests. “I hope that other young, aspiring Alaska Native lawyers who receive this scholarship will also go back to work for their communities.”

Establishing the scholarship was also very personally meaningful to Flannery. “When Aaron came to me with this idea, it reminded me of my grandmother. She didn’t graduate from high school, but she always prioritized education. She made sure all eight of her daughters graduated high school, she encouraged them to go on to college and a number of them did.”

“Before I finished law school, she passed away,” Flannery shared. “One of her requests to her daughters was they sell her house and her truck, and put those funds into a scholarship fund. So I am excited about the opportunity to do something similar, to follow in her footsteps and continue to promote education.”

“We are very grateful for the vision and the dedication Aaron, Marissa and the Doyon, Limited board have shown by establishing this scholarship,” Miller said. “It will undoubtedly benefit many students who want to go into this important field, but who need the financial support to do so. Many of our students return to their home communities to work after graduating, so this is an investment with long-term benefits for us all.”

If you would like to join in supporting this new scholarship fund, you may make a secure online donation on the Foundation website; be sure to note “competitive law scholarship” in the “special instructions” box. Donations may also be made by mailing a check to Doyon Foundation at 615 Bidwell Ave., Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska 99701. Please note “competitive law scholarship” in the memo line.

For more information about Doyon Foundation, scholarship eligibility and application instructions, or opportunities to support students, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

 

Online Lessons to be Created for Nine Indigenous Languages of Doyon Region

 

Doyon Foundation has received a three-year, $977,423 grant from the U.S. Department of Education – Alaska Native Educational Program to expand its language revitalization efforts through the Doyon Languages Online II project.

Group of language learners participate in an activity

Holy Cross Deg Xinag Language Gathering

Through the project, the Foundation will increase the number of people who speak Nee’anděg’ (Tanacross), Née’aaneegn’ (Upper Tanana), Deg Xinag and Denak’i (Upper Kuskokwim) by creating more than 220 online language-learning lessons, training teachers in the use of the technology through partnerships with the Alaska Gateway and Iditarod school districts, and field testing the lessons with students.

The funding will allow the Foundation to build on the progress of the existing Doyon Languages Online project, which is already in the process of developing online language-learning lessons for five of the Doyon region languages: Holikachuk, Denaakk’e (Koyukon), Benhti Kenaga’ (Lower Tanana), Hän, and Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa (Gwich’in).

“With this new grant, we will be able to produce online learning opportunities for nine of the 10 indigenous languages of the Doyon region,” said Doris Miller, executive director of Doyon Foundation. The nine languages targeted in the two Doyon Languages Online projects currently have little or no online educational materials for those wanting to learn.

Doyon Languages Online is a project of the Foundation’s language revitalization program, and is a partnership with 7000 Languages, a nonprofit that supports endangered language learning partially through software donated by Transparent Language. The Foundation first partnered with 7000 Languages in 2014 to create and provide learning content for the languages of the Doyon region in an accessible, engaging and proven online environment.

Two women at table reviewing Native language learning documents

Northway Where Are Your Keys Workshop

The 10 indigenous languages of the Doyon region represent half of the 20 total Alaska Native languages, which were recently made official languages of the state of Alaska. The 10 Doyon region languages are all severely to critically endangered, and are not being passed on to younger generations quickly enough to ensure their survival.

“Every year we are losing more of our Elders and first language speakers,” said Allan Hayton, director of the Foundation’s language revitalization program. “Today there are no villages in the Doyon region where children are learning their ancestral language as their first language.”

“But with this grant funding, combined with the support of our partners, the expertise of our Elders and teachers, and the interest of our people, there is real hope that we will pass on our languages to the next generations,” he said.

Doyon Foundation is the private foundation established in 1989 by Doyon, Limited to provide educational, career and cultural opportunities to enhance the identity and quality of life for Doyon shareholders. The Foundation, with support from Doyon, Limited, created the language revitalization program in 2012 to ensure the cultures and languages of the Doyon region are taught, documented and easily accessible.

For more information on Doyon Foundation and its language revitalization program and Doyon Languages Online project, visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact Doris Miller, executive director, or Allan Hayton, language revitalization program director, at foundation@doyon.com or 907.459.2048.

As a first step since receiving the three-year, $900,000 Native American Language Preservation and Maintenance grant from the Administration for Native Americans, Doyon Foundation is seeking applications for a project manager for the Doyon Languages Online project.

“We are very excited to start working on this project and are looking for a dynamic individual to join our team,” said Doris Miller, Foundation executive director.

As part of the Doyon Languages Online project, a total of 280 introductory online lessons will be created for five of the critically endangered Doyon languages: Holikachuk, Denaakk’e, Benhti Kenaga’, Hän, and Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa. The lessons will be made widely available to language teachers and learners in Alaska and throughout the United States. Language teachers will also receive training in using the lessons in local educational settings, from schools to homes to community events.

Under the supervision of the Foundation’s Language Revitalization Program director, the Doyon Languages Online project manager will be responsible for all stages of the Doyon Language Online project, to include project development, implementation, oversight, and grant compliance requirements. In this exciting position, the project manager will design a curriculum template, oversee content creation and delivery, lead community outreach, and handle grant reporting.

Applicants should have at least three years experience in education or related field, a bachelor’s degree in education or related field, at least two years demonstrated experience managing federal grant awards and grant reporting requirements, and experience or studies in Alaska Native languages or linguistics.

View the job description for more information on essential functions; required knowledge, skills and abilities; minimum qualifications and other details. Interested applicants are encouraged to apply online. The job application closing date is November 1.

For more information on Doyon Foundation and the Doyon Languages Online project, visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact Doris Miller, executive director, at millerd@doyon.com or 907.459.2050.

Doyon Foundation is currently seeking candidates for two open seats on its board of directors. The deadline to apply is Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 5 p.m.

The open positions are for three-year terms expiring in 2019. The seats up for election are currently held by Lanien Livingston and Sonta Roach.

Qualifications

Candidates seeking election to the Doyon Foundation board must be:

  • A Doyon, Limited shareholder
  • 18 years of age or older
  • Knowledgeable about private foundation management and higher education
  • Familiar with the Foundation’s strategic plan, long-term vision and goals, and mission and purpose
  • Committed to carrying out the duties of a board member, which include:
    • Attending quarterly board meetings
    • Serving on two board committees
    • Completing work outside of meetings
    • Representing the Foundation at various events
    • Speaking on behalf of the Foundation at events, if asked

If you love to build relationships, share your enthusiasm for a cause, and impact the resources available to a nonprofit, this board seat may be right for you! Doyon Foundation is specifically interested in candidates with experience with nonprofit boards, fundraising, financial management, endowment fund investing, culture and language revitalization, and Alaska Native education.

Important Notice

Please note that, under federal laws governing private foundations, family members of Doyon Foundation board members are NOT eligible to receive a Doyon Foundation basic or competitive scholarship during their term on the board. Family members are defined as the board members’ spouse, ancestors, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and the spouses of children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Current Doyon Foundation scholarship recipients are also not eligible to serve on the board.

Responsibilities/Job Description

The duties of a Doyon Foundation board member include:

  • Contribute skills that help the Foundation make progress on its strategic plan.
  • Consistently work toward and produce results related to the Foundation’s strategic focus areas, which include providing consistent measurable results, diversifying and growing revenue streams, increasing shareholder educational opportunities, enhancing operations, and revitalizing languages and traditional Native values.
  • Define and oversee the mission of the Foundation and keep it relevant to the needs of Doyon shareholders and their descendants.
  • Approve programs/services and monitor their effectiveness.
  • Provide strategic guidance to the Foundation and its executive director.
  • Ensure financial solvency and help raise resources.
  • Select, support and evaluate the executive director.
  • Ensure continuous board improvement.
  • Attend quarterly meetings in Fairbanks, Alaska, as well as any special meetings called.
  • Serve on two board committees and possibly chair one committee, which include finance/investment, development/fundraising, language revitalization/culture, and governance.
  • Participate in at least one board training event each year.
  • Demonstrate willingness to take on other duties and assignments, as needed.
  • Represent and, if asked, speak on behalf of Doyon Foundation at various events.

Application Instructions/Deadline

Applications are accepted using an online form, available here. The form does not take long to fill out and candidates are able to upload resumes and/or other materials.

Candidates may also download and print a hard-copy form here. Completed forms should be mailed to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Avenue, Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99701. Mailing instructions are provided on the form.

Please note that candidates are required to submit an updated resume along with their completed application.

It is highly recommended that candidates familiarize themselves with the Foundation and its work by reviewing the Foundation’s website, blog and Facebook page prior to submitting an application.

The deadline to apply is Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 5 p.m.

For more information, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact Doris Miller, Doyon Foundation executive director, at 907.459.2048 or millerd@doyon.com.

 

 

Language revitalization in the Doyon region took a giant leap forward this week when the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) announced that Doyon Foundation has been selected to receive a Native American Language Preservation and Maintenance grant totaling $900,000 over a three-year period.Doyon_Language_Map

The 10 ancestral languages of the Doyon region, including nine Athabascan languages plus Inupiaq, represent half of the 20 Native languages in the state of Alaska. All of the Doyon region languages are severely to critically endangered, and will be lost within the span of a few generations if no action is taken. Doyon Foundation, with support from Doyon, Limited, established its language revitalization program in 2009 to support the revitalization of Interior Alaska’s Native languages.

“We are humbled and grateful to have been awarded in a highly competitive selection process. This news is very exciting, and this project will be a huge assist to those wanting to teach and learn their ancestral language,” said Allan Hayton, director of the Foundation’s language revitalization program.

The grant will help fund the Doyon Languages Online project, a partnership with 7000 Languages, a nonprofit that supports endangered language learning partially through software donated by Transparent Language. The Foundation first partnered with 7000 Languages in 2014 to create and provide learning content for the languages of the Doyon region in an accessible, engaging and proven online environment.

“As Native people, our languages are part of our identity and are very precious to us. Our children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren deserve to have the opportunity to learn their language,” said Doris Miller, Foundation executive director. “We are honored to be able to assist in creating this learning and teaching software to further language revitalization in the Doyon region.”

During the three-year grant project, a total of 280 introductory online lessons will be created for five of the Doyon languages: Holikachuk, Denaakk’e, Benhti Kenaga’, Hän, and Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa. Ultimately, the Foundation aims to create online courses for all of the Doyon region languages.

The lessons will be made widely available to language teachers and learners in Alaska and throughout the United States. Language teachers will also receive training in using the lessons in local educational settings, from schools to homes to community events.

“We’re thrilled that, after years of hard work, our partners at Doyon Foundation are finally getting the funding they deserve to revitalize their languages. We can’t wait to get started on this project,” said Alexa Little, executive director of 7000 Languages.

“We greatly enjoy supporting 7000 Languages, and I’m especially excited to see the Doyon Foundation 7000 Partnership using the Transparent Language technology platform for such a wonderful purpose,” said Michael Quinlan, CEO of Transparent Language, Inc.

ANA, which is an office of the Administration for Children and Families, promotes self-sufficiency and cultural preservation for Native Americans by providing discretionary grant funding for community-based projects, and training and technical assistance to eligible tribes and Native organizations.

For more information on ANA and its grant programs, visit www.acf.hhs.gov/ana/grants. For information on Transparent Language and 7000 Languages, visit www.transparent.com/about/7000-languages.html.

For more information on Doyon Foundation and the Doyon Languages Online project, visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact Doris Miller, executive director, at millerd@doyon.com or 907.459.2050.

The sun was shining, golf balls were flying and scholarship funds were growing at the 16th annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, which took place June 16 and 17 at the Chena Bend Golf Course on Fort Wainwright in Fairbanks. The two-day event included a skills tournament and reception and Calcutta on Thursday, and the golf tournament and banquet on Friday. Find event photos on Facebook.

CEO Aaron Schutt

Doyon, Limited president and CEO Aaron Schutt

Doyon Foundation and Doyon, Limited thank the 120 golfers, 50 sponsors and over 50 volunteers who came out to support this year’s event, which raises money for the Morris Thompson Competitive Scholarship Fund. The fund was established to support college students exhibiting the qualities most admired in the late Morris Thompson – vision, dedication to excellence, exemplary leadership and integrity. To date, the fund has made it possible to award 678 Morris Thompson competitive scholarships totaling $710,680. Last year alone, the Foundation awarded 10 of these competitive scholarships totaling $58,000.

“These scholarships are only made possible by the generosity of our supporters. Many people came together to organize and participate in this event to make it a success, and we are very grateful for the support,” said Doris Miller, Doyon Foundation executive director.

The skills tournament on Thursday featured three events – a putting contest, longest drive contest and chipping contest. Winners of those contests are listed on our website.

Student Speaker Krysten Walker

Student speaker Krysten Walker

At the Thursday evening reception and Calcutta, guests heard from two Morris Thompson recipients – alumni speaker Aaron Roth and student speaker Krysten Walker, who each shared about what Doyon Foundation’s support has meant.

“Looking back on it now, I think it was my greatest accomplishment while I was in school,” Roth said of his scholarship. “(Doyon Foundation) was always there. I could always count on them. They were a constant. That level of support and predictability is invaluable to a student,” added Roth, who graduated in 2013 with degrees in finance and management and later got a job with a Doyon subsidiary.

“When I started my freshman year at Stanford, my Doyon Foundation scholarship meant that I could spend time getting settled into campus instead of spending 30 hours a week at a campus job … When I started my sophomore year, my Doyon Foundation scholarship meant that I could be president of my sorority … Going into my junior year, my scholarship meant that I could stay on campus for the summer and work on launching the redesigned Stanford Law School website … And now, entering my senior year, Doyon Foundation means so much more. With the help of Doyon Foundation, I will be graduating on time and debt-free next spring,” said Walker, who will receive a bachelor’s degree in science, technology and society from Stanford University.

Calcutta guests also bid on a variety of attractive live auction items, including trips to the Peppermill Resort Spa Casino in Reno, Nevada, and Tulalip Resort and Casino in Washington state, a his and hers golf package from Callaway, a Prudhoe Bay experience, and a seven-day cruise on Holland America. In the Calcutta, guests bid on the golfer team they thought would win Friday’s tournament.

On Friday, there was a three-way tie for first place in the golf tournament. Congratulations to team 21 (Milo Griffin, Glen Anderson, Anand Vadapalli and JP Hoff), team 24 (Todd Vincelette, Antone Contento, Jay Sadler and Avery Thomas), and team 25 (Rick Boyles, Tom Walsh, Scott Jepsen and Joe Marushack), as well as to the winning Calcutta team buyers Sophie Minich and Aaron Schutt.

While amounts are still being tallied, preliminary estimates indicate the event raised nearly $80,000. The total amount will be announced on the Foundation website, blog and social media channels once finalized.

Interested sponsors and golfers are encouraged to mark their calendars for the 2017 golf classic, scheduled for Thursday and Friday, June 22 and 23 in Fairbanks.

For more information on the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic or Doyon Foundation scholarships, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.