As a first step since receiving the three-year, $900,000 Native American Language Preservation and Maintenance grant from the Administration for Native Americans, Doyon Foundation is seeking applications for a project manager for the Doyon Languages Online project.

“We are very excited to start working on this project and are looking for a dynamic individual to join our team,” said Doris Miller, Foundation executive director.

As part of the Doyon Languages Online project, a total of 280 introductory online lessons will be created for five of the critically endangered Doyon languages: Holikachuk, Denaakk’e, Benhti Kenaga’, Hän, and Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa. The lessons will be made widely available to language teachers and learners in Alaska and throughout the United States. Language teachers will also receive training in using the lessons in local educational settings, from schools to homes to community events.

Under the supervision of the Foundation’s Language Revitalization Program director, the Doyon Languages Online project manager will be responsible for all stages of the Doyon Language Online project, to include project development, implementation, oversight, and grant compliance requirements. In this exciting position, the project manager will design a curriculum template, oversee content creation and delivery, lead community outreach, and handle grant reporting.

Applicants should have at least three years experience in education or related field, a bachelor’s degree in education or related field, at least two years demonstrated experience managing federal grant awards and grant reporting requirements, and experience or studies in Alaska Native languages or linguistics.

View the job description for more information on essential functions; required knowledge, skills and abilities; minimum qualifications and other details. Interested applicants are encouraged to apply online. The job application closing date is November 1.

For more information on Doyon Foundation and the Doyon Languages Online project, visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact Doris Miller, executive director, at millerd@doyon.com or 907.459.2050.

Doyon Foundation is currently seeking candidates for two open seats on its board of directors. The deadline to apply is Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 5 p.m.

The open positions are for three-year terms expiring in 2019. The seats up for election are currently held by Lanien Livingston and Sonta Roach.

Qualifications

Candidates seeking election to the Doyon Foundation board must be:

  • A Doyon, Limited shareholder
  • 18 years of age or older
  • Knowledgeable about private foundation management and higher education
  • Familiar with the Foundation’s strategic plan, long-term vision and goals, and mission and purpose
  • Committed to carrying out the duties of a board member, which include:
    • Attending quarterly board meetings
    • Serving on two board committees
    • Completing work outside of meetings
    • Representing the Foundation at various events
    • Speaking on behalf of the Foundation at events, if asked

If you love to build relationships, share your enthusiasm for a cause, and impact the resources available to a nonprofit, this board seat may be right for you! Doyon Foundation is specifically interested in candidates with experience with nonprofit boards, fundraising, financial management, endowment fund investing, culture and language revitalization, and Alaska Native education.

Important Notice

Please note that, under federal laws governing private foundations, family members of Doyon Foundation board members are NOT eligible to receive a Doyon Foundation basic or competitive scholarship during their term on the board. Family members are defined as the board members’ spouse, ancestors, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and the spouses of children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Current Doyon Foundation scholarship recipients are also not eligible to serve on the board.

Responsibilities/Job Description

The duties of a Doyon Foundation board member include:

  • Contribute skills that help the Foundation make progress on its strategic plan.
  • Consistently work toward and produce results related to the Foundation’s strategic focus areas, which include providing consistent measurable results, diversifying and growing revenue streams, increasing shareholder educational opportunities, enhancing operations, and revitalizing languages and traditional Native values.
  • Define and oversee the mission of the Foundation and keep it relevant to the needs of Doyon shareholders and their descendants.
  • Approve programs/services and monitor their effectiveness.
  • Provide strategic guidance to the Foundation and its executive director.
  • Ensure financial solvency and help raise resources.
  • Select, support and evaluate the executive director.
  • Ensure continuous board improvement.
  • Attend quarterly meetings in Fairbanks, Alaska, as well as any special meetings called.
  • Serve on two board committees and possibly chair one committee, which include finance/investment, development/fundraising, language revitalization/culture, and governance.
  • Participate in at least one board training event each year.
  • Demonstrate willingness to take on other duties and assignments, as needed.
  • Represent and, if asked, speak on behalf of Doyon Foundation at various events.

Application Instructions/Deadline

Applications are accepted using an online form, available here. The form does not take long to fill out and candidates are able to upload resumes and/or other materials.

Candidates may also download and print a hard-copy form here. Completed forms should be mailed to Doyon Foundation, 615 Bidwell Avenue, Suite 101, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99701. Mailing instructions are provided on the form.

Please note that candidates are required to submit an updated resume along with their completed application.

It is highly recommended that candidates familiarize themselves with the Foundation and its work by reviewing the Foundation’s website, blog and Facebook page prior to submitting an application.

The deadline to apply is Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 5 p.m.

For more information, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact Doris Miller, Doyon Foundation executive director, at 907.459.2048 or millerd@doyon.com.

 

 

Language revitalization in the Doyon region took a giant leap forward this week when the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) announced that Doyon Foundation has been selected to receive a Native American Language Preservation and Maintenance grant totaling $900,000 over a three-year period.Doyon_Language_Map

The 10 ancestral languages of the Doyon region, including nine Athabascan languages plus Inupiaq, represent half of the 20 Native languages in the state of Alaska. All of the Doyon region languages are severely to critically endangered, and will be lost within the span of a few generations if no action is taken. Doyon Foundation, with support from Doyon, Limited, established its language revitalization program in 2009 to support the revitalization of Interior Alaska’s Native languages.

“We are humbled and grateful to have been awarded in a highly competitive selection process. This news is very exciting, and this project will be a huge assist to those wanting to teach and learn their ancestral language,” said Allan Hayton, director of the Foundation’s language revitalization program.

The grant will help fund the Doyon Languages Online project, a partnership with 7000 Languages, a nonprofit that supports endangered language learning partially through software donated by Transparent Language. The Foundation first partnered with 7000 Languages in 2014 to create and provide learning content for the languages of the Doyon region in an accessible, engaging and proven online environment.

“As Native people, our languages are part of our identity and are very precious to us. Our children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren deserve to have the opportunity to learn their language,” said Doris Miller, Foundation executive director. “We are honored to be able to assist in creating this learning and teaching software to further language revitalization in the Doyon region.”

During the three-year grant project, a total of 280 introductory online lessons will be created for five of the Doyon languages: Holikachuk, Denaakk’e, Benhti Kenaga’, Hän, and Dinjii Zhuh K’yaa. Ultimately, the Foundation aims to create online courses for all of the Doyon region languages.

The lessons will be made widely available to language teachers and learners in Alaska and throughout the United States. Language teachers will also receive training in using the lessons in local educational settings, from schools to homes to community events.

“We’re thrilled that, after years of hard work, our partners at Doyon Foundation are finally getting the funding they deserve to revitalize their languages. We can’t wait to get started on this project,” said Alexa Little, executive director of 7000 Languages.

“We greatly enjoy supporting 7000 Languages, and I’m especially excited to see the Doyon Foundation 7000 Partnership using the Transparent Language technology platform for such a wonderful purpose,” said Michael Quinlan, CEO of Transparent Language, Inc.

ANA, which is an office of the Administration for Children and Families, promotes self-sufficiency and cultural preservation for Native Americans by providing discretionary grant funding for community-based projects, and training and technical assistance to eligible tribes and Native organizations.

For more information on ANA and its grant programs, visit www.acf.hhs.gov/ana/grants. For information on Transparent Language and 7000 Languages, visit www.transparent.com/about/7000-languages.html.

For more information on Doyon Foundation and the Doyon Languages Online project, visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact Doris Miller, executive director, at millerd@doyon.com or 907.459.2050.

The sun was shining, golf balls were flying and scholarship funds were growing at the 16th annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, which took place June 16 and 17 at the Chena Bend Golf Course on Fort Wainwright in Fairbanks. The two-day event included a skills tournament and reception and Calcutta on Thursday, and the golf tournament and banquet on Friday. Find event photos on Facebook.

CEO Aaron Schutt

Doyon, Limited president and CEO Aaron Schutt

Doyon Foundation and Doyon, Limited thank the 120 golfers, 50 sponsors and over 50 volunteers who came out to support this year’s event, which raises money for the Morris Thompson Competitive Scholarship Fund. The fund was established to support college students exhibiting the qualities most admired in the late Morris Thompson – vision, dedication to excellence, exemplary leadership and integrity. To date, the fund has made it possible to award 678 Morris Thompson competitive scholarships totaling $710,680. Last year alone, the Foundation awarded 10 of these competitive scholarships totaling $58,000.

“These scholarships are only made possible by the generosity of our supporters. Many people came together to organize and participate in this event to make it a success, and we are very grateful for the support,” said Doris Miller, Doyon Foundation executive director.

The skills tournament on Thursday featured three events – a putting contest, longest drive contest and chipping contest. Winners of those contests are listed on our website.

Student Speaker Krysten Walker

Student speaker Krysten Walker

At the Thursday evening reception and Calcutta, guests heard from two Morris Thompson recipients – alumni speaker Aaron Roth and student speaker Krysten Walker, who each shared about what Doyon Foundation’s support has meant.

“Looking back on it now, I think it was my greatest accomplishment while I was in school,” Roth said of his scholarship. “(Doyon Foundation) was always there. I could always count on them. They were a constant. That level of support and predictability is invaluable to a student,” added Roth, who graduated in 2013 with degrees in finance and management and later got a job with a Doyon subsidiary.

“When I started my freshman year at Stanford, my Doyon Foundation scholarship meant that I could spend time getting settled into campus instead of spending 30 hours a week at a campus job … When I started my sophomore year, my Doyon Foundation scholarship meant that I could be president of my sorority … Going into my junior year, my scholarship meant that I could stay on campus for the summer and work on launching the redesigned Stanford Law School website … And now, entering my senior year, Doyon Foundation means so much more. With the help of Doyon Foundation, I will be graduating on time and debt-free next spring,” said Walker, who will receive a bachelor’s degree in science, technology and society from Stanford University.

Calcutta guests also bid on a variety of attractive live auction items, including trips to the Peppermill Resort Spa Casino in Reno, Nevada, and Tulalip Resort and Casino in Washington state, a his and hers golf package from Callaway, a Prudhoe Bay experience, and a seven-day cruise on Holland America. In the Calcutta, guests bid on the golfer team they thought would win Friday’s tournament.

On Friday, there was a three-way tie for first place in the golf tournament. Congratulations to team 21 (Milo Griffin, Glen Anderson, Anand Vadapalli and JP Hoff), team 24 (Todd Vincelette, Antone Contento, Jay Sadler and Avery Thomas), and team 25 (Rick Boyles, Tom Walsh, Scott Jepsen and Joe Marushack), as well as to the winning Calcutta team buyers Sophie Minich and Aaron Schutt.

While amounts are still being tallied, preliminary estimates indicate the event raised nearly $80,000. The total amount will be announced on the Foundation website, blog and social media channels once finalized.

Interested sponsors and golfers are encouraged to mark their calendars for the 2017 golf classic, scheduled for Thursday and Friday, June 22 and 23 in Fairbanks.

For more information on the Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic or Doyon Foundation scholarships, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact 907.459.2048 or foundation@doyon.com.

More than 50 family, friends and other supporters gathered to celebrate the class of 2016 at the Doyon Foundation Graduate Reception, held May 6 in Fairbanks. The event recognized the 80 Doyon Foundation students who graduated from high school or college this spring. See more photos on Facebook!

Join us in saying “congratulations” to the class of 2016 in one of our Native languages!

  • Hǫǫsǫǫ dįįdį’ = You did great (Née’aaneegn’ – Upper Tanana)
  • Neeshoo tr’inlii = We’re happy for you. (Gwich’in)
  • Ngoxo dinaxoneł = We’re happy for you. (Deg Xinag)
  • Yeho sodegets’eeyh = I am happy for you. (Denaakk’e)

Our 2016 Graduate Reception included a welcome from Doris Miller, Foundation executive director, Lanien Livingston, Foundation board president, and Doyon, Limited President and CEO Aaron M. Schutt, as well as an address from alumna speaker Melissa McGinty and graduate speaker Jason Paskvan. The graduates in attendance also had the opportunity to introduce themselves to the audience.

Our graduate speaker, Melissa McGinty, holds a bachelor’s of business administration from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and a master’s in business administration from the University of Alaska Southeast. She shared her reflections on getting to where she is today – a journey that included an accounting internship at Doyon, Limited and several years working at Doyon Foundation. “Education is absolutely needed but experience with that is key,” she said.

She also spoke about her dream to get her master’s degree and how she found a way to accomplish that without going into debt. “The moral of that story is to plan and to set your goals and it’ll happen,” Melissa said. See Melissa’s full speech on YouTube.

Graduate speaker Jason Paskvan began his speech with an introduction in his Native language. Jason, who graduated from the University of Alaska Fairbanks last month with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering, spoke about the three critical steps to overcoming obstacles – perception, action and will. He also encouraged his fellow graduates to “remember the good times and good experiences we had in school.”

Jason closed with a quote from Bruce Lee, who said, “Always be yourself. Express yourself. Have faith in yourself. Do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it.” Jason added, “If we work to be ourselves and be the best we can be, we’ll make a difference.” See Jason’s full speech on YouTube.

Learn more about the class of 2016 in our electronic graduate yearbook! We’ll be publishing the yearbook, featuring photos and short bios of all 2016 graduates, this month. To receive the yearbook, simply join the Foundation’s e-newsletter list at www.doyonfoundation.com.

Congratulations to the Doyon Foundation class of 2016!

  • Alicia Ambrosio, Business Management, Master’s of Business Administration

  • Tracey Arnold, Addiction Studies, Master’s Certificate

  • Angelica Baalam, Nursing, Associate’s of Applied Science

  • Geoffrey Bacon, Industrial and Labor Relations, Master’s of Arts

  • Amanda Bailey, Transfer Degree, Associate’s of Arts

  • Aloysia Ballard, Medical Assistant, Associate’s of Applied Science

  • Carrie Bazilwich, Psychology, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Dennis Blackburn, Teaching and Learning, Master’s of Arts

  • Charlotte Brinkman, Tribal Management, Certificate

  • Leslie Brooks, Mathematics, Chemistry, Bachelor’s of Science

  • Matthew Calhoun, Civil Engineering, Doctor of Philosophy

  • Melvin Captain, High School Diploma

  • Jada Carroll, High School Diploma

  • Peter Charlie, Human Services/Psychology, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Courtney Cradock, History in Secondary Education, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Gabriella Chase, High School Diploma

  • Brenna Cruger, High School Diploma

  • Johnny David, Jr., Information Technology, Associate’s of Applied Science

  • Leah David, Accounting Technician, Certificate

  • Taylor Davis, Kinesiology, Bachelor’s of Science

  • Hillary Demit, High School Diploma

  • Emily Dobson, General Studies, Bachelor’s of Business Administration

  • Matthew Driskill, Accounting, Doctor of Philosophy

  • Sonya Edwards, Elementary Education, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Stanley Edwin, Atmospheric Science, Master’s of Science

  • Kailey Erickson, Exercise Science, Master’s of Science

  • Eve Esmailka-Blake, Tribal Governance and Business Management, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Kaden Girard, High School Diploma

  • Joseph Gregory, Computer Technician, Certificate

  • Jacob Gustafson, Film, Associate’s of Arts

  • Monica Gustafson, Alaska Native Studies, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Gary Hawkins, Diesel Mechanic, Associate’s of Arts

  • Brittany Henry, High School Diploma

  • Thomas Henry, High School Diploma

  • Sarah Henzie, High School Diploma

  • Lethearen Jimmie, High School Diploma

  • Jenny Johnson, Health, Associate’s of Arts

  • Raymond Kangas, Mechanical Engineering, Bachelor’s of Science

  • Tiana Kraus, Social Work, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Patricia Kriska, Nurse Aide, Certificate

  • Patrick Lovell, Engineering, Bachelor’s of Science

  • Deanna Mayo, Applied Business, Associate’s of Arts

  • Jolene McGinty, School of Education-Counseling, Master’s of Arts

  • Sharon Menzo, Business/Finance, Associate’s of Applied Science

  • Codi Miller, Biology, Bachelor’s of Science

  • Beattus Moses, High School Diploma

  • Kaylee Nelson, High School Diploma

  • Vincent Nusunginya, General, Associate’s of Arts

  • Adam Paskvan, Chemistry, Bachelor’s of Science

  • Jason Paskvan, Mechanical Engineering, Bachelor’s of Science

  • Dalarie Peters, Public Administration, Master’s of Arts

  • Ruby Peters, High School Diploma

  • Tristan Richardson, High School Diploma

  • Karena Rounsaville, Medicine, Medical Doctor

  • Corina Sam, High School Diploma

  • Dustina Sam, High School Diploma

  • Shirley Sam, Tribal Management, Associate’s of Arts

  • Annie Sanford, High School Diploma

  • Alisia Serrano, Nutrition/Dietetics, Bachelor’s of Science

  • Natalya Shellikoff, High School Diploma

  • Edna Silva, Business Management, Bachelor’s of Science in Business Administration

  • Crystal Smith, Biomedical Sciences, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Alyssa Sommer, Power Technology: Diesel Emphasis, Associate’s of Applied Science

  • Sonja Sommer, General Business, Bachelor’s of Business Administration

  • Brian Stanley, English, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Anastasia Starr, Bookkeeping, Associate’s of Arts

  • Adele Stickman, Accounting, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Brand Strom, Radiology, Associate’s of Applied Science

  • Tiana Teter, Human Services, Associate’s of Arts

  • Tamara Thomas, Health Information Management, Associate’s of Applied Science

  • Charlissa Titus, High School Diploma

  • Allison Turner, Occupational Safety and Health, Associate’s of Applied Science

  • Sarah Walker, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy, Master’s of Arts

  • Lisa Weimer, Business, Associate’s of Arts

  • Darren Whitworth, Chaplain Ministry, Master’s of Divinity

  • Ashley Williams, Supply Chain Management, Bachelor’s of Arts and Sciences

  • Lorelei Winkelman, Medical Administration, Associate’s of Arts

  • Mikel Winkelman, Dietetics, Bachelor’s of Science

  • Kyle Demientieff-Worl, Anthropology and Alaska Native Studies, Bachelor’s of Arts

  • Natasha Yates, Applied Science, Associate’s of Arts

  • Malari Zarate, Liberal Studies, Bachelor’s of Arts

 

Doyon Foundation is happy to announce the 2016 Our Language grant awardees. The Foundation received 17 proposals for consideration this year. After careful review and evaluation by the selection committee, nine proposals have been fully or partially funded, with awards totaling $50,000. Of this year’s recipients, seven are first-time awardees.

The 10 ancestral languages of the Doyon region are all severely to critically endangered, and the Our Language grant program was developed to support the revitalization of these languages. Doyon, Limited originally established the language grant program in 2012. The Foundation’s language revitalization program now administers the grant program.

This year’s funded projects represent many different aspects of language revitalization, from documentation to curriculum development to summer camp activities. The 2016 Our Language grants will help to fund the following efforts:

Alaska Native Heritage Center (ANHC): ANHC will offer eight language immersion sessions (two Saturdays per month) from November to February in Koyukon and Gwich’in. Experienced instructors will work with eight apprentices. The goal of these sessions is to develop a cohort of new language instructors.

Anvik: Deg Xinag Digitization Project. The Anvik Tribal Council will promote language revitalization by digitizing Deg Xinag language recordings collected over 40-plus years. These recordings represent stories, language lessons, history, knowledge and culture from elders that have passed on. These items will be converted into digital-format DVDs and MP4s to reach younger generations.

Eagle: This project involves working with fluent speakers to integrate language into key cultural activities, including hunting, fishing, sewing, drum and canoe making, with a goal to provide context and greater meaning for learners. Eagle is incorporating this project into a larger initiative supported by CIRI Foundation’s Journey to What Matters, which focuses on revitalizing traditional arts and crafts.

Huslia: Denaakk’e Hustlers Project. In Huslia this summer, youth workers will develop basic Denaakk’e lessons with instructor Susan Paskvan. Young people will collect lessons and other materials from elders and share them with other language-learners by posting online. “We live in a changing world … and we have to bridge the gap between elders and youth. This project is one way that we can bring young and old together around language,” wrote Tribal Administrator Shandara Swatling.

Koyukuk: Four community elders will instruct a class for adult language learners, with the aim to “speak in full sentences.” The adults will be immersed in the language, and will themselves become instructors by passing the language they learn on to young people.

Nenana: This project will integrate language learning into summer camp activities. Language topics will include familial terms, greetings, names for different plants, animals, days of the week, tools and materials. Students will also learn Athabascan songs and dances. The lessons will be shared using the Where Are Your Keys method, and documented for future learners.

Nikolai: Denak’i Nots’whtolnich. This project will gather elders together to speak Denak’i, and document the stories, songs, knowledge and insights they share. Nikolai has listed language as a high priority among their community goals.

Northway: This project will support weekly language instruction and materials for grades K-5 at the Walter Northway School. Instructor Lorraine Titus will teach language through songs and dances of the Northway Tribe. Lorraine also offers cultural nights, an annual summer camp, and other events during the school year. “This project is just a part of the bigger effort to support continued teaching of the Northway language,” said Tribal Administrator Nichol Rallo.

Rampart: The communities of Rampart and Tanana will collaborate on a language course at the Rampart Community Hall. The goal is for learners to be able to introduce themselves in Denaakk’e, and learn common greetings and traditional place names. Each learner will also make a book of nouns and verbs. Learners will be able to use the content in different combinations to create new and complete sentences.

Each of the projects also include plans to document language through the use of audio and video recordings, and some grant recipients will be posting their work online and social media. Watch the Foundation website, www.doyonfoundation.com, and Facebook page, www.facebook.com/doyonfoundation, for updates on the projects as they progress.

“There were many fine proposals this year, and the selection committee regrets that we cannot fund them all,” said Allan Hayton, Foundation language revitalization program director. “It is encouraging to see the range of proposals and the various activities planned to revitalize ancestral languages across the region. Doyon Foundation commends everyone for their commitment to the future of our languages, and encourages continued planning, and creative thinking for how we will continue our languages into the future.”

For more information on the grants or Doyon Foundation’s language revitalization program, please visit www.doyonfoundation.com or contact Allan Hayton at haytona@doyon.com or 907.459.2162.

Time is running out to take our language revitalization survey – and be entered to win an Amazon gift card! This Sunday, March 27 is the last day to complete the survey.Amazon gift card

If you are a Doyon, Limited shareholder, we invite you to complete our online survey here.

The survey asks for your opinion about language revitalization, information about your knowledge and use of your Native language, and your thoughts on proposed language revitalization strategies. It should take no more than 10 minutes to complete.

To show our appreciation for your time, you will be entered to win a $100 or $50 Amazon gift card at the end of the survey!

If you have any questions, please contact the Foundation at 907.459.2050 or foundation@doyon.com.