118_People Promotion_Jayne_FB-IN

In honor of the 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, we’d like to introduce you to another of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Jayne Martin. A 2019 graduate who holds bachelor’s degrees in safety management and business management, Jayne earned Morris Thompson competitive scholarships awarded by Doyon Foundation. Her parents are Jean Martin of Clarion, Pennsylvania, and Jim Martin of Butler, Pennsylvania. Jayne’s hometown is Meadville, Pennsylvania.

Jayne is a graduate of Slippery Rock University in Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania. She lives in Virginia where she’s employed as a safety coordinator with Rosendin Electric, a design-build engineering company founded in 1919.

Doyon Foundation: Congratulations on your new job and earning two degrees in four years. How did Doyon Foundation help you achieve your goals?

Jayne Martin: The Foundation helped endlessly by awarding me with scholarships every semester. Without those scholarships, it would have been difficult to stay in school and earn two degrees in my four years.

DF: That’s a significant achievement.

JM: My biggest challenge was overcoming challenges that were new to me. But the greatest challenges and struggles in life bring you the greatest rewards. I learned that it’s important to be resilient and face challenges head on.

I would tell everyone to always remember that failure is a part of life. Failing is a learning opportunity that can make you stronger and better in the end.

DF: And beyond the classroom? How did you spend your time?

JM: I was part of a Relay for Life team representing my college majors. In my freshman year, I was a seminar peer leader. I’ve volunteered through my church and was a member of professional groups including Women in Safety Excellence and the American Society of Safety Professionals.

DF: Now that you’re settling into a new home and a new job what’s on the horizon for you?

JM: I plan to continue working for Rosendin and eventually earn credentials as an Associate Safety Professional and Certified Safety Professional. I want to become a safety manager one day.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students earn college degrees. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. This year’s golf classic took place June 13 and 14 in Fairbanks.

A special thank you to all of our 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic sponsors, including our custom sponsors:

  • Alyeska Pipeline Service Company
  • Avalon Development Corporation
  • American Tire & Auto
  • Associated Pipe Line Contractors, Inc.
  • Avalon Development Corporation
  • B & H Promotions
  • Bruce Abbott & Helen Renfrew
  • Carlson Center
  • Chena Hot Springs Resort
  • Colville, Inc.
  • DW Grill & Catering
  • Explore Fairbanks
  • Chevrolet Buick GMC of Fairbanks
  • GCI
  • Great Harvest Bread Company
  • McCafferty’s, A Coffee House, Etc.
  • Moose’s Tooth/Bear Tooth
  • NOV Rig Technologies
  • Peppermill Reno
  • Salon Bella
  • Santina’s Flowers & Gifts
  • Sophie’s Station & Zach’s Restaurant
  • Spenard Roadhouse
  • Strategies 360
  • Street Sounds
  • Sunrise Bagel & Espresso
  • The Outpost
  • The Woodway
  • Westmark Fairbanks
  • Yukon Quest

Your support makes scholarships for students like Jayne possible! View all 2019 sponsors on our website.

To learn about future opportunities to support the event as a sponsor, golfer or volunteer, visit the Foundation website for details. 

118_People Promotion_Janelle_FB-INIn honor of the 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, we’d like to introduce you to another of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Janelle Solbos. A doctoral pharmacy student from Anchorage, Janelle is the daughter of Darrell Butler Jerue of Anvik and Carol H. Jerue of Portland, Oregon. Janelle’s paternal grandmother is Alta Jerue of Anvik.

Janelle attends the University Alaska Anchorage (UAA)-Idaho State University pharmacy program. She graduates in May 2020.

Doyon Foundation: Congratulations as you work toward a doctorate in pharmacy in a very competitive program at UAA. What does that fourth and final year of schooling hold for you?

Janelle Solbos: The fourth year is spent on rotations, learning from pharmacists in at least seven different settings. I’m poring myself into applying everything I’ve learned over the past three years to become a competent and caring pharmacist.

DF: Educating future pharmacists committed to remaining in Alaska is a key mission of your program. What are your plans as an Alaska pharmacist?

JS: I’m learning everything I can to serve Alaskans living in rural communities, especially places with limited connections to outside resources, a condition that’s true of many Alaska communities.

My husband and I have family living on Prince of Wales island in southeast Alaska. We hope to move there after pharmacy school.

DF: How did your interest in a pharmacy begin? Where has that interest taken you?

JS: Before enrolling in pharmacy school and for the first half of it, I worked as a pharmacy technician at two Anchorage hospitals. That’s where I was inspired to become a pharmacist.

I’ve held numerous student roles throughout pharmacy school. I was the first pharmacy student in Alaska to serve as a local chair of Operation Diabetes, a nationwide effort of the American Pharmacists Association Academy of Student Pharmacists to screen people at risk for diabetes.

I’ve also prepared and presented a drug utilization review, known as a DUR, for an Alaska Medical Assistance DUR committee meeting. These reviews are a quality-assurance measure. I also volunteer regularly as a Babies First Friend at neonatal and pediatric intensive care units at the Alaska Native Medical Center. Volunteering has been an incredible experience in meeting and supporting Alaska Native families.

DF: How have these efforts added to your program’s emphasis on educating pharmacists who serve as patient advocates?

JS: My volunteering and outreach activities are very valuable and rewarding. A desire to help Alaskans is the reason I decided I want to become a pharmacist and still want to be one.

My biggest challenge has been balancing my time and effort between outreach and volunteer work and extremely demanding coursework in the first years of pharmacy school. Support from Doyon Foundation and my family allowed me to spend time on both of these passions.

DF: How has Doyon Foundation helped you reach your goals?

JS: Foundation support meant that I could spend time establishing new roles on campus and becoming the first student in my program to hold a variety of positions with professional organizations in pharmacy.

Doyon Foundation generously supported my education so that I could limit my working hours to part time. That left time to study and pursue projects that supported my peers, community and learning.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students earn college degrees. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. This year’s golf classic took place June 13 and 14 in Fairbanks.

A special thank you to all of our 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic sponsors, including our certificate level sponsors: Davis Wright Tremaine, LLP, and Taiga Mining Company. Your support makes scholarships for students like Janelle possible! View all 2019 sponsors on our website.

To learn about future opportunities to support the event as a sponsor, golfer or volunteer, visit the Foundation website for details. 

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In honor of the 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, we’d like to introduce you to another of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Annie Sanford. A University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) student from Tok, Annie is the daughter of Dewayne Carl Sanford and Lena Blair Sanford, both of Tok. Her paternal grandparents are Walter and Laura Sanford of Tanacross. Her maternal grandparents are Mary Jane Tom Tom Blair and William Blair, both of Snag, Yukon.

Annie is pursuing an associate degree in applied science in radiologic technology. She’s completing a summer internship for academic credit at Bassett Army Community Hospital in Fairbanks. She graduates in 2020.

Annie was the featured student speaker at the 2017 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic. The annual fundraiser benefits Doyon Foundation scholarships and honors the memory of the late Morris Thompson, who served as president and chief operating officer of Doyon, Limited.

Doyon Foundation: Your degree program at UAA is competitive — only about a third of students who apply are accepted. What are some challenges you’ve encountered?

Annie Sanford: The biggest challenge I faced during my education would have to be starting my practicum while taking radiology courses. The practicum is building my confidence and knowledge in healthcare, but it’s also a new experience that requires learning a new environment and working with a wide range of people.

Finding a balance between hands-on radiology while learning new coursework was difficult. I was able to keep a strong head on my shoulders and kept persevering with the support of family, friends and classmates. Their encouraging words and gestures constantly remind me of the wonderful work I’ll be able to do once I complete my program.

DF: And when you’re not focused on school?

AS: I spend time with family and friends or at the student recreation center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. In April I volunteered at a conference of the Alaska Society of Radiologic Technologists. It was a good chance to meet people in my field and learn more about it.

DF: How did earning a Morris Thompson scholarship, awarded competitively by Doyon Foundation, help with your education?

AS: Education has always been part of who I am. Doyon Foundation provided enormous support, financially and through student events like a Navajo taco dinner. These gestures made gaining a higher education easier. I’m a full-time student and very much appreciate the Foundation’s efforts.

DF: You’ve mentioned that keeping a goal in sight helped relieve stress. That sounds like a success tip for other students.

AS: Yes. There’ll be times when you’ll feel overwhelmed with stress from school and life in general. That’s when it’s important to take time to surround yourself with positivity — whether that’s time with family and friends or just a day to relax.

I’ve learned that when you surround yourself with positivity, you’ll be reminded that feelings of stress are worth pushing through to reach your goal.

DF: What’s ahead for you?

AS: I’ll continue taking radiology courses in the 2019 – 2020 academic year while completing practicum hours around class time. I’m on track to graduate in May 2020. Once I’m certified as a radiologic technician, I hope to work at Tanana Valley Clinic or Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center in Fairbanks.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students earn college degrees. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. This year’s golf classic took place June 13 and 14 in Fairbanks.
A special thank you to all of our 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic sponsors, including our hole sponsors: Alaska Communications, Alaska National Insurance Company, Chapman Capitol Consulting Inc., Doyon Board of Directors, Doyon Senior Management, Doyon Utilities, Great Northwest Inc., Hilcorp Alaska, LLC, Kent Dawson Company, Inc., Lynden International, Marsh | Wortham, NOV Rig Technologies, Northrim Bank, Owl Ridge Natural, Resource Consultants, Inc., Pearl Meyer, Stoel Rives LLP, Texas AGA, and Ultimate Software Group, Inc. Your support makes scholarships for students like Annie possible! View all 2019 sponsors on our website.

To learn about future opportunities to support the event as a sponsor, golfer or volunteer, visit the Foundation website for details.

118_People Promotion_Megan_FB_INIn honor of the 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, we’d like to introduce you to another of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Megan Patsy. A graduate of AVTEC-Alaska’s Institute of Technology, Megan is the daughter of Donna Demoski and James Patsy, both of Nulato. Her maternal grandparents are Ida Demoski of Nulato and Glenn Demoski, Sr., of Anvik. Her paternal grandparents are Laurie Ralston of Nulato and Andrew Sommer of Galena.

Megan earned a Morris Thompson competitive scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation.

Her hometown is Nulato.

Megan Patsy is a step closer to her long-term plan of starting her own business since graduating in May 2019 with a certificate in administrative support. Attending school in Seward, where AVTEC has been located since 1968, prompted some homesickness.

“My biggest challenge was being so far from home,” Megan recalled. “What I did to overcome this was to remind myself that time away to attend school was just 10 months. I’d have years ahead to be at home.”

Megan’s plans include attending the University of Alaska Fairbanks in the fall.

She credits the Morris Thompson scholarship awarded by Doyon Foundation with helping her toward her lifetime goals.

“Education is the most important thing,” Megan said.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students earn college degrees. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. This year’s golf classic took place June 13 and 14 in Fairbanks.

A special thank you to all of our 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic sponsors, including our Associate level sponsors: Alaska Permanent Capital Management, BP, Council Tree Investors, Covington & Burling LLP, Holland America, KPMG, Petrotechnical Resources of Alaska, and Ravn Alaska. Your support makes scholarships for students like Megan possible! View all 2019 sponsors on our website.

To learn about future opportunities to support the event as a sponsor, golfer or volunteer, visit the Foundation website for details. 

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In honor of the 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic, we’d like to introduce you to another of our amazing Morris Thompson competitive scholarship recipients: Cory LePore is a student at the University of Hawaii Manoa where he’s pursuing a master of arts degree in economics. Originally from Bethel, Cory is the son of Cory LePore Sr. and Cindy LePore, both of Bethel. His maternal grandparents are Beverly Turner and Thaddeus Tikiun, both of Holy Cross.

Cory earned an undergraduate degree in economics from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) in 2018. He is a member of the International Economics Honor Society, which recognizes scholastic achievement.

Doyon Foundation: Congratulations as you look ahead to earning your master’s degree in 2020. What attracts you to economics?

Cory LePore: Our world has many economic challenges that we’re facing daily and the fact that there’s no one correct way to approach those problems is so fascinating. Studying economics provides me with skills to make an impact on those problems throughout my lifetime.

DF: Economics is famous for being a difficult field, one that requires good ability in math and statistics as well as an understanding of human behavior.

CL: My biggest challenge has been trying to find my proper way to study. I found myself trying to cram math material into my brain the night before an exam and I ended up doing subpar.

I was in my first year as undergraduate at UAF when I found a way to study that suited me. I realized I’d have to dedicate more time and effort. I tried breaking my study time into several days, usually starting a week before an exam, and then study a couple of hours a day. I saw a massive change for the better in my grades.

I found this approach by trying all sorts of study techniques. I tried studying in a group and using flash cards. I’d read and research different strategies online.

DF: Your advice to other students is to remember that teachers and advisers are there to help. How did you learn this lesson? Why do you think so many students overlook these sources of help?

CL: I think they’re afraid. Students tend to think that teachers are there to teach and that’s it. But in reality, most teachers love when you interact with them outside of class. It shows you’re willing to challenge yourself and that you really want to learn the topic.

DF: You’ll be interning at Alyeska Pipeline Service Company this summer.

CL: I’ve been at Alyeska the past three summers. The work involves spreadsheet modeling, demand and market analysis, profit maximization analysis, and assisting in contract negotiations.

Interning provides me with hands-on experience so I’ll be better prepared as soon as I enter the workforce.

DF: How did Doyon Foundation scholarships help you?

CL: I was able to just take my classes and focus on school. Doyon Foundation scholarships freed up so much of my time and stress by allowing me to not have to work full time while in school.

Thank you so much for your academic support of Alaska Native students. It’s very much appreciated!

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students earn college degrees. The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. This year’s golf classic took place June 13 and 14 in Fairbanks.

A special thank you to all of our 2019 Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic sponsors, including our Doctorate-level sponsors: Associated Pipe Line Contractors, Inc., Doyon Family of Companies, and KeyBank and Key Equipment Finance. Your support makes scholarships for students like Cory possible! View all 2019 sponsors on our website.

To learn about future opportunities to support the event as a sponsor, golfer or volunteer, visit the Foundation website for details. 

Born and raised in Fairbanks, Julian Thibedeau is a student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF). He’ll earn a certificate in rural human services in 2019 and begin his associate’s degree in the Tribal Management Program at UAF in the fall of 2018. Julian’s mother is the late Ruth Maxine Thibedeau; his grandparents are the late Richard “Shorty” Thibedeau of Stone Lake, Wisconsin, and the late Ruth Lillian Mayo of Rampart. 

Julian, 29, is a full-time maintenance technician at Doyon, Limited. He received a Morris Thompson scholarship for the 2017 – 2018 school year.

JulianDoyon Foundation: Julian, you were away from school from several years before earning a Doyon Foundation scholarship and pursuing your degree. What prompted you to go back to school?

Julian: It had been 10 or 12 years since I’d been to school. College was really foreign to me. I’d say to myself, “Man, what I am even doing here?” It was as if I was in strange territory!

I’d just put my best foot forward, give it my all and not be afraid to ask questions. I’d like to thank my professors and classmates who really helped introduce me to college. It took dedication and perseverance to see it through.

Doyon Foundation: And Doyon Foundation scholarships helped hold you accountable?

Julian: I wanted to keep earning that scholarship to complete my degree and of course I’d have to keep my grades up. The scholarship kind of helped keep me in check because I knew my funding depended on my grades.

I’d like to say thank you to Doyon Foundation. I don’t think it would have been possible to go to school worry free and stress free otherwise.

Doyon Foundation: How did you manage tough courses? Everyone faces them eventually.

Julian: Courses with a lot of writing and research were a challenge. Classes in library science, introduction to databases and resources – these require being able to cite information and I wasn’t familiar with that. My strategy was to just do the assignments. Even if I knew they weren’t 100 percent right, I’d just give it my best effort. I had really helpful professors.

Doyon Foundation: You’re looking forward to finishing the semester and starting an internship with First Alaskans.

Julian: My internship starts June 10 with an orientation week in Anchorage, then an assignment in Fairbanks for the summer. I’d like to intern in behavioral health or community outreach.

I’ll also go fishing during the summer at Rampart with my daughter, Adriel. She’ll be 7 and I want her to have a connection with the land. I think there’s a lot of healing within traditional knowledge, learning from Elders, knowing who you are and where you come from.

Doyon Foundation: You’ve said that Adriel inspires you. How do you mean?

Julian: My daughter is on my mind because I’d like to see the advancement of Alaska Native people, not just my generation but generations to come. In the long-term, I’d like to mentor at-risk youth and those who fall through the cracks. My sobriety and recovery make me want to give back to the community that I used to take away from.

I’m Athabascan, and I drum and sing Athabascan songs. I’d like to go across the country, parts of the United States and Canada, and learn more songs.

Doyon Foundation: Giving back is something you’re committed to.

Julian: Yes. In my free time, I speak at the Fairbanks Native Association’s Youth Treatment Center. I come from that background. Sometimes the youth need people to talk to who know what it’s like to be in treatment.

I’ve also organized a volunteer street cleanup every year for the past three years in downtown Fairbanks and the neighborhood south of downtown. I chose those places because they get overlooked.

I went to the mayor and said that if I got the litter bags and the bags were filled up, would public works pick up all those yellow bags. The answer was yes. It was just another way for me to give back.

Doyon Foundation: Any advice for students who identify with your experiences?

Julian: We all have that inner voice that says you can’t do it, that you’re not worthy. For instance, accepting scholarships and grants felt to me at first as if I was taking a handout. I had to suck up my pride, but then I realized that these things were an opportunity – and not only an opportunity but an obligation to your people, to your tribe, and to yourself.

My advice is simple: Believe in yourself!

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students earn college degrees. 

The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. This year’s golf classic takes place June 21 and 22 in Fairbanks. To learn about opportunities to support the event as a sponsor or volunteer, visit the Foundation website for details. 

Doyon Foundation student Shawna Hildebrand attends the University of Alaska Southeast (UAS), where she’s earning a master’s degree in public administration with an emphasis in rural development. Her parents are Edith and Darell Hildebrand of Nulato. Shawna’s maternal grandparents are the late Eleanor and Hughey Kriska of Koyukuk, and her paternal grandparents are Edith and Victor Nicholas of Nulato.

When she’s not in school, Shawna enjoys fishing and processing fish, among other cultural activities. Her hometown is Nulato. Shawna graduates in December 2018.

Shawna Hildenbrand
Doyon Foundation:
Keeping up with your courses became a significant obstacle this year. Can you say more about that?

Shawna Hildebrand: The biggest challenge this year has been the ability to do school work. I know that sounds bad, but during the fall semester I had surgery on my elbow, making it impossible to type for about two months. Even with a cast on.

I’m especially thankful for my professors – who were understanding of my grammatical mistakes – and assistive technology that permitted me to get all my homework done while I was healing. I definitely came to appreciate Doyon Foundation scholarships that allowed me to obtain the technology I needed to do my schoolwork and take part in class.

Doyon Foundation: That willingness to persevere sounds a lot like your advice to other students.

Shawna: The most important thing is to remember that you can do anything you set your mind to. That’s such a cliché, but it’s true.

Take the time to do your schoolwork and find a schedule that works for you. Don’t take your professors for granted either; they’re there to help you succeed and will work with you on assignments you are having difficulty with. The biggest thing is you need to be sure you’re going to school for something you love.

Doyon Foundation: You’ve experienced that first-hand.

Shawna: I put off deciding on a master’s program for five years because I couldn’t commit entirely to a master’s in counseling. I spent time looking at various degree programs and ultimately decided on the Master of Public Administration (MPA) at UAS after talking to some family.

The program intrigued me and fell in line with what I wanted to do with my career. I decided to jump feet first and here I am, less than two years later, about to graduate with my MPA in rural development.

Doyon Foundation: The degree seems to combine your professional work, your volunteer efforts and your long-term goals.

Shawna: I’m currently learning the world of self-governance at Tanana Chiefs Conference (TCC), where I’m employed as a self-governance operations coordinator. I’ve always said I would go to college and return to serve our people in whatever capacity they need me to.

Working full time and going to school full time haven’t left a lot of room for other activities, but I do volunteer as a committee co-chair at the Alaska Statewide Violence and Injury Prevention Partnership (ASVIPP).

ASVIPP is dedicated to reducing injury-related morbidity and mortality by providing leadership and expertise in the preparation, implementation, coordination and periodic review of injury prevention efforts.

I became involved because of my work in injury prevention and suicide prevention with TCC, and through partnerships with Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. While my past work experience involved prevention, I find myself moving more toward assisting tribes in their self-determination efforts.

Doyon Foundation: You’ve earned Doyon Foundation scholarships since your undergraduate years. What has the Foundation’s help meant to you?

Shawna: I graduated from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in psychology and sociology, and Doyon Foundation funded a large part of my degree. When I applied to UAS as a graduate student, Doyon Foundation again awarded me a scholarship, making student loans less of a burden. I appreciate these scholarships for helping offset the cost of my education.

Named in honor of the late Morris Thompson, former president and CEO of Doyon, Limited, the Morris Thompson Scholarship, awarded by Doyon Foundation, has helped more than 200 students earn college degrees. 

The annual Morris Thompson Memorial Golf Classic raises money for this competitive scholarship fund. This year’s golf classic takes place June 21 and 22 in Fairbanks. To learn about opportunities to support the event as a sponsor or volunteer, visit the Foundation website for details.